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Got an Offer for Free Wood

Post in 'The Green Room' started by littlesmokey, Jul 9, 2007.

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  1. littlesmokey

    littlesmokey Minister of Fire

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    Got an offer for free wood as much as I can take. Problem is it's "trestle wood". I turned it down, figured it would eat threw the stoves in less than two years. Here's why. Trestle wood is oak and vertical grained fir from eighty to a hundred and twenty years old used to build the Lucerne cut-off over the Great Salt Lake. The Moisture content is less than 5%, but the salt content is higher. I figured burning salt soaked wood at high temp would eat through my stove box. I have seen what the timbers does to machines, don't want to replace even the shop stove (cheapest). Anyone disagree???? Should I get it back?

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  2. keyman512us

    keyman512us Member

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    Littlesmokey....

    (Trying to hold back the 'pain of laughter here)....

    It sounds wild... and it sounds like quite the dilema. I never in a million years would have imagined that timber would be "re claimed". You bring up a good point.

    Have you talked to anyone that has burned that timber in the past?

    Sounds a little "far fetched" but given the high salt content of that lake and how long it sat in the water...I can believe it soaked up some salt. Whether or not it would damage the stove??? Dunno...

    This thread get's my vote for "The wildest free wood here on the hearth" though.. ;)

    BTW... I thought it was called the "Lucin Cut-off"?????

    Got any pictures of what the wood "looks like" out of curiousity??? I wouldn't mind having a piece or two "for a momento"lol ;)

    It's amazing what the SP did...trully awe inspiring and a testament of what man can do when he "puts his mind to something".

    I thought almost all of that timber "got buried" twenty years ago??? No???
  3. R&D Guy

    R&D Guy New Member

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    From what I can recall from High School :shut: (thinking hard) the salt content in the great lakes is much greater than that of the ocean. I can tell you from the coasties, the drift wood from the ocean is enough to eat your stove alive and void your warrantee - brick and stainless too. From what I understand your thin flue pipe is the first to go. I think you made the right call. Use the wood for your fire pit, and save the salt free stuff for your stove.
  4. kinsman

    kinsman New Member

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    Take the wood. Burn it in the fireplace or stove.
    The great lakes are FRESH water.
    Less than 0.5 ppm of salts.

    David
    (a nooby)
  5. kinsman

    kinsman New Member

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    may I please retract my stupid comment. You wrote "Great SALT Lake.

    OOPS


    11
  6. babalu87

    babalu87 New Member

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    Great Lakes are fresh water
    The Great SALT Lake however contained much ........................ wait for it.............................. SALT
  7. littlesmokey

    littlesmokey Minister of Fire

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    The lake is the remainder of ancient Lake Bonneville. Thought to be the largest inland lake ever (not my stat). The basin that the current lake is in has no outlet. The timbers were set before the turn of the 20th century. The irony is there was no bedrock found. I have heard posts 100 feet long have been pulled from the muck.

    Now imagine spending over a hundred years back in salt. You talk about stinky wood.

    I turned a bowl for the "giver" yesterday. Had to use a hood and air pump. The exhaust fan ran full blast. I have worked with nasty wood before, but I took the bowl and shavings back to my friend. He can add it to his dust bins. I must say it was like turning alabaster, took the knives well, but they needed a lot of sharpening. I tested the moisture and he was right about 5%. A wax finish and it glowed. I like the look of the finished product, but would not work it or burn it.
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