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Hat's of to you all, this site, and thanks for the tips

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by OldLumberKid, Nov 25, 2012.

  1. OldLumberKid

    OldLumberKid Feeling the Heat

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    First, hats off to all of you who provide so much useful information here. Thanks — it's invaluable for newbs like myself. I've been lurking and learning for weeks here. (With the NHL on strike it frees up for plenty of hearth.com reading time.)

    Walking the dog at night, I had been intoxicated and envious for a long time by the the occasional wafted scent of wood fires burning in houses I pass.

    I have a fireplace, but it had been declared off-limits for fires by "the boss" while the kids were growing.

    But after Sandy's long power outage, the abundance of wood to scavenge and begin seasoning, the boss has been persuaded the fireplace might have a backup or occasional use. I am looking at having an insert installed.

    First, however, I'm going to have NCSG chimney pro check it over to see if it needs any additional work since the last cleaning.

    In the meantime, I've gotten a jump on the woodpile with some recently purchased tools. Unwieldy logs are definitely a lot harder work than even cutting up 8'x4' sheets of inch-thick Marine ply for contractors during my summer job several decades ago for a timber/hardware merchant.

    So again hats off to you: you guys mow some serious wood alright, but your safety tips are truly appreciated.

    One thing is still bugging me — how often do you guys find yourselves deadlifting 100-lb plus logs from site to truck and truck to home sawing site? At what log weight do you enlist the help of whomever you can in moving logs ;)
    103lbchoppingblockweb.jpg chopblock.jpg
    I was curious, this 16" diameter log section (currently serving as my chopping block) seemed a lot heavier than my 71# Labrador Retriever-collie mix. And sure enough the scales say it's half my weight. Wowzer! So ... how do you folks manage lugging these 100#+ logs around from site to truck and truck to yard?

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  2. jatoxico

    jatoxico Minister of Fire

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    Welcome aboard OLK. Sandy sure did leave us plenty to remember her by. As long as you want to have a fire, even occassionally you might as get some heat out of it so an insert or stove is the way to go.

    As far as lugging wood I do find myself doing a lot of lifting. One thing you can do is bring a splitting ax along (I like the Fiskars) to halve or quarter up rounds to make it easier.
    Blue2ndaries and OldLumberKid like this.
  3. WellSeasoned

    WellSeasoned Guest

    Definitely, cut in half. Don't want to hurt yourself. Flat wood ramps help alot rolling rounds into a truck bed. I bring my splitter when I can to the site. The less handling the wood the better. Maybe a dolly would help too.
    Blue2ndaries and OldLumberKid like this.
  4. rdust

    rdust Minister of Fire

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    I tore my back up a couple years back so I don't lift the big stuff like that by myself anymore.(1 back surgery is enough for me!) I'll either half them on site or when I use my trailer I use a dolly and ramps to load them into the trailer.
  5. osagebow

    osagebow Minister of Fire

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    Deadlifted several big rounds on my first coupla scrounges last year.
    Stupid. lucky i didn't get the hernia / slipped disk I was asking for. I "Noodle" in half with a chainsaw or split with sledge now before loading anything that is bigger than my 75 lb. Pit/greyhound mix. ;)

    Agree with the "Hats off" - have learned a ton here.
    Blue2ndaries and OldLumberKid like this.
  6. StacksCT

    StacksCT New Member

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    Osagebow, what do you mean by "noodle" in half with the chainsaw?

    OLK, welcome. I highly recommend an insert. This is our first year, and it has been simply great. Your wife will love the heat and the peace of mind about its availability even during a power outage.
    OldLumberKid likes this.
  7. osagebow

    osagebow Minister of Fire

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    Noodle = Cut lengthwise. You cut the round growth rings into semicircles. In many species it produces thin "noodles" of wood. Fact # 237 I learned here.:)
  8. StacksCT

    StacksCT New Member

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    Gotcha -- thanks for the answer.
    osagebow likes this.
  9. swagler85

    swagler85 Minister of Fire

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    and the noodles double as great firestarters
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  10. bogydave

    bogydave Minister of Fire

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    Split before lifting, Roll them, trailer, dolly wheel barrow etc
    .* * Important * * Save your back, use mechanical assists, or break it down to manageable size !! :)

    It's surprising how many of the big rounds split fairly easy when green. Few taps with a maul, manageable sizes then ;)
    Bet the one you showed will split into some nice splits when green, with out a huge effort. Guessing ash ?
    I always saved some gnarly- knotty un-splitable round for my splitting block, cut it at a little angle about 10 to 12" tall for my height ;)

    Some reference for green wood weights round diameter per 1 foot section:

    grnwod.jpg

    PS: Welcome
    OldLumberKid and Blue2ndaries like this.
  11. MasterMech

    MasterMech Guest

    Take a plank or an equipment ramp with you. I take one of my aluminum tractor ramps with me when I know I'm in big wood. Then just roll them up into the truck. I routinely handle 200+lb rounds with this method.

    I don't recommend "deadlifting" rounds into the truck. Just asking for trouble.

    Other methods that work well:

    Take a maul, sledge & wedge, fiskars, etc. with you to break 'em down to manageable sizes.
    If you have a splitter, take it along with you, maybe even split to final size on-site if time allows.
    Noodle 'em down with the saw. This takes a little experience to become "easy" but will break down even the nastiest rounds.
    OldLumberKid likes this.
  12. SolarAndWood

    SolarAndWood Minister of Fire

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    While I would love to get my hands on a liftgate, this thing has made everything I come across loadable.

    Attached Files:

  13. WellSeasoned

    WellSeasoned Guest

    Does that ramp have rollers? That would be nice! That beats even rolling rounds up. Plus its a slide on the way down!
  14. SolarAndWood

    SolarAndWood Minister of Fire

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    Yeah its out of a factory or maybe an old grocery store? I have to block it about half way up and be somewhat careful even then as it is Aluminum.
    ScotO and OldLumberKid like this.
  15. WellSeasoned

    WellSeasoned Guest

    Sweet setup!:)
  16. Beer Belly

    Beer Belly Minister of Fire

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    Been using a 2x6x10 lately on the now slightly bent tailgate
    ScotO likes this.
  17. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

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    I just grab one up under each arm and walk to the trailer.::P
  18. swagler85

    swagler85 Minister of Fire

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    maybe you can throw em on that sweet chair in your avatar
    OldLumberKid likes this.
  19. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    A despicable practice. :)
    OldLumberKid and osagebow like this.
  20. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

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    noodle:
    Notice the round that has been sliced in half.

    Attached Files:

    ScotO and OldLumberKid like this.
  21. Danno77

    Danno77 Minister of Fire

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    I split on the spot, or I noodle if it's knotty. I can't remember a log i couldn't get into my truck somehow. 100lbs is nuthin. that's a hundred pounds less than a stripe in my drawers, and 170 pounds less than a visit to the doctor for a back injury. I'm too stupid to know my limitations, but it gets work done.
    ScotO and scotvl like this.
  22. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    Welcome to the forum OldLumberKid.

    I don't dead lift as much as I once could nor do I want to. Nor do I noodle. Somehow that just does not set well with me... But there are some tricks that will help you and make things a lot easier. Here is the biggest trick tool for handling big rounds:

    Canthook.jpg
    As BogyDave stated, usually it is up to just me to get the wood and I do my best to not be lazy but do try to find the simple and easy methods. The cant hook is one tool I would really hate to do without.

    We have an ATV trailer that is low to the ground and also has tilt so rolling a heavy round up into the trailer is the way to go. Before we had this we had a higher trailer so it was much more work and we sort of built steps out of rounds. Get the heavy up onto one, rest, then onto the other, rest, then into the trailer.

    One time I had to clean up a big tree at a friends place and just took a van. Well, I also took along a 2 x 10 so I could roll the big ones up into the van. Usually I would get it part way up with the cant hook but the last short roll was all by hand.

    Some on here like the Fiskar's axe but I don't. A splitting maul or even a sledge and a couple wedges work much better. Of course the ultimate is the hydraulic splitter. You do not have to own one as there are many places where one can rent one for a day or two at reasonable prices. They surely make splitting wood much more fun! Making kindling wood with a hydraulic splitter is a piece of cake too.

    You will definitely do yourself a big favor by getting plenty of wood on hand before you shell out dollars for the stove. We always recommend folks have a 3 year supply of wood split and stacked. That wood is hard to beat for giving heat.
  23. Machria

    Machria Minister of Fire

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    OldLumber,
    Is that maple? I was just splitting some logs that looked exactly like that yesterday, I'm trying to ID it in another thread I started today. That stuff splits sooooo east and nice, whatever it is. Not sure how it burns but will find out next year.

    GREAT question though! I've been driving around picking up what Sandy left us, and having a hard time getting it all in the truck. Most of it was cust into 4' to 6' long rounds, which are weighting a ton!

    Welcome to the site, as you mentioned, amazing amount of info here!!
  24. OldLumberKid

    OldLumberKid Feeling the Heat

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    Well I don't know where to begin to thank all you folks for all the advice on this,

    But thanks.

    I'm glad I asked ... I suspected but had not seen anything about noodling before, and was cautious about trying it in case it was unpredictable. Was only familiar with bucking as far as chainsaws were concerned.
    http://ohiowoodburnerowb.blogspot.com/2011/12/noodling-with-chainsaw.html

    The logavan is definitely long enough to accommodate a ramp. And I have other uses for it.

    Duly noted.

    Thanks for the chart.

    That 16" diameter x 17" piece, I'm kind of attached to it — it's just an all-round beautiful piece of wood. Perfect bark. I'm in no hurry to chop up my current block ;). But it does seem to call out for the axe, all the same.

    Dog might appreciate a plank or two these days, to get into the Dodge Logavan, as the leap is getting a bit much for him, so maybe a dual solution there. That little white spot up the bridge of his nose, BTW, is a scar from a long-ago night time raccoon battle.


    As for the log in the picture, the one distinguishing feature it has is a really fine linear-looking grain to the bark compared with many of the very coarse barked trees around here.

    Shoud have remembered where I got it, and checked the leaves in the area, but too late for that.
    It's my chopping block for now... until I find a "gnarly- knotty and un-splittable," round as bogydave suggested

    Nice, not sure I'd know how to use it, but who would not want a hook like that?

    And the wood collection/seasoning is definitely a long term project. No illlusions there.
    One step at a time. But a good quality chimney inspection is top of the list right now.

    Just got word of a relative who may need help with a large tree down in New City, N.Y. But that's probably a job best left to the pros. Another friend has one down that is 100+ yrs 3-foot thick no problem. Someone already harvested the manageable size limbs, leaving the monster 3' parts behind.

    I knew there had to be a laugh in there somewhere.
    Oh wait ... you're serious ;)
    PS Jags, no bearing to Jaromir Jagr, right? Some call him Jargs or Jags

    Ouch — that puts it in perspective.
    Back's already prone to aggro sometimes, so perhaps I best avoid the grunting and heaving, and do things a little smarter.
    ScotO and Backwoods Savage like this.
  25. Jeff S

    Jeff S Feeling the Heat

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    Bogydave that's a nice chart, where did you get it ?

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