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  1. Todd

    Todd Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2005
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    Loc:
    Lake Wissota
    Anyone ever try one of these panels?

    www.eheat.com

    At 400 watts they claim they cost only 3 cents per hour to run. I was thinking it might be a good way to boost up the temps in those hard, far away rooms where the wood stove heat can't reach?

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  2. Mike Wilson

    Mike Wilson New Member

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    Orient Point, NY
    I've seen these panels at a friend's home in the UK. They work fine, but he has the typical euro small room house, and uses them in a small guest room and two bathrooms (which he doesn't even heat when nobody is there). They also have doors that close off each room in the house, including the living and dining rooms. So, in that environment, they work as space heaters. Problem is, as noted, 400 watts is 400 watts is 400 watts. Any electrical heater is basically 100% efficient, so its a wash.
  3. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Hey Todd,

    I sometimes heat my 12 x 14 ft office with a small electric heater set to it's lowest heat of 600 watts. A small heater can be better for remote locations or for times when I'm the only one home and instead of bringing the entire house up to temps for the day, I just heat the office. It can be also a good solution to warm up a room that is only used occasionally. After about an hour, the heat from the computers and monitors is usually enough to heat the room (and giving off about the same btus).

    As far as the panel technology goes, the heat panels have no special corner on heating efficiency. This particular panel seems quite pricey. I think you can do much better. My main criteria is that it's safe, has a fan to circulate the heat faster and it must be quiet. But that is because I am looking for a quick heatup. I have a Braun heater (no longer sold in the US). It looks like Caframo bought the design. (http://www.caframo.com/heaters.htm) Some other safe choices are oil filled radiators and Intertherm makes a portable baseboard unit that is very safe. The 3 cents per hour figure is accurate if your electricity costs about 7.5 cents per kw/hr. Your mileage will vary with local rates.
  4. Todd

    Todd Minister of Fire

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    Loc:
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    Thanks guys,
    It does seem kind of high priced for only a 400 watt heater. Too small for the 12x12 room I was thinking of. Last year I stuck one of those small oil filled radiator type heaters in there and it heated great, but my electric bill almost doubled. My daughter is just going to have to learn to keep her door open more to allow more wood stove heat into her room.
  5. drizler

    drizler Minister of Fire

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    Nov 20, 2005
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    Loc:
    Chazy, NY 12921
    I bought one of those oil filled 1500 watt (900 & 600 ) switchable radiators from AMES about 20 years back for $30. They probably aren't more than that today.They heat a small room, don't get hot and can't start fires or burn kids. Mine comes in handy once in a while.
  6. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Hey, you didn't mention that this was for a kid's room. That throws all sense of energy conservation right out the window. :) At least in my office, I remember to turn it off.
  7. fbelec

    fbelec Minister of Fire

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    Nov 23, 2005
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    1,689
    Loc:
    northern massachusetts
    i've wired some of those heat panels for a customer. most require 240 volts you can't just plug them in. and they're like being out in the sun. 40 degree day in the sun feels nice and warm, the moment that sun goes behind a cloud your freezing. they require a wall thermostat so it could be a little while running before the thermostat is satisfied and shuts off because they are designed to heat objects not the air, and the thermostat is sensing the air temp.
    yes all electric heaters are 100 percent efficient but if one runs longer because it is designed different it will cost more to run.
    in my opinion if you don't need quick heat the oil filled radiator is the best. no noise and it can't start a fire because it's close to something flammable. and with any electric heater if it is running and the door to that room is open it will run your electric bill up trying to heat the hallway and rest of the house. your right, keep the door open for wood heat or keep it closed for electric.
  8. Rhone

    Rhone Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2005
    Messages:
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    I've had luck using 250W heat lamps. We're redoing the bathroom on the upper floor of our house and the only bathroom we can use right now is our basement. I don't heat the basement, and nothing like coming out of a shower when the basement's 35-45 degrees! I didn't want a convection heater, as taking a 20 minute shower all the heated air would be sucked out and replaced with the 35-45 degree air and those things use a lot of electricity. So, I like Franks term because that's exactly what I thought of when I saw it. What a perfect application for a french fry light, it's 250W, doesn't waste energy heating air that's going to be sucked out, and tricks us into thinking we're warmer than it is and practically instant. I bought a 60's one off E-Bay for $15 and aim it so when we come out of the shower, we're hit by its warming light and makes taking a shower in an unheated basement tolerable. At 250W and 35-45 air temperature it needs to be within 3 feet to make me feel like I'm nice and warm, and it does take about 15-30 seconds for it to start warming me. It's not just pop in the light and you instantly feel warm, but much shorter than convection heaters and I turn it on going in, and shut it off when I leave.

    I think it would work well if your daughter stays in one spot, as they are spot heaters. I recommend you buy a used french-fry light off e-bay like this one which is much like mine to see if it will work. Only $4 right now, I bought mine for $15, and planned on getting a good one later after testing. That used one worked so well didn't need another. If your daughter happen to have a lizard or turtle once, you may already have a heat light. I figure a 250W heat lamp for 4 hours a day, that's around $5.40 a month.
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