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Heating a pole barn for the winter

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by mcdanie1, Dec 1, 2011.

  1. mcdanie1

    mcdanie1 New Member

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    Greetings all!
    We are building a pole barn to park our camper in for the winter. The catch is that we will be living in the camper/pole barn as well :)

    The dimensions of the pb are 50'x50'. I am looking for a wood stove to heat with for the winter and came across the Osburn 2400. I like the reviews that I've seen so far on the Osburn but was wondering if anyone with first hand experience would recommend this stove for this application? I thought about soeveral other m ore utilitarian type stoves like the Fire Chief and such, but they just don't have the 'fireplace' feel like the stoves with the glass in the front. We will probably be congrating in and around the area where the stove will be quite a bit so being able to watch the flames is a big plus.

    Any thoughts or recommendations would be greatly apprecited.

    Thanks,

    Mac

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  2. oldspark

    oldspark Guest

    You plan on heating the whole pole barn with no insulation?
  3. mcdanie1

    mcdanie1 New Member

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    That would be funny, wouldn't it? I knew I forgot something in the post. The pole barn will be insulated probably with 3" thick styrofoam sheets. That seems to be what the locals are using and it seems to work pretty well.

    Thanks!
  4. Heater Helper

    Heater Helper New Member

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    The Osburn should do a good job for you. I've seen good reviews on it.
  5. wkpoor

    wkpoor Minister of Fire

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    There are some old smoke dragons well suited to that environment or maybe look at the Elm but thats not a cheap alternative.
  6. oldspark

    oldspark Guest

    50 X50 =2500 sq ft so not that far out line with heating needs for a house correct?
  7. mcdanie1

    mcdanie1 New Member

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    That is correct.
  8. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    Welcome to the forum mcdanie1. It sounds like a good plan to me. Will you be installing some fans; perhaps ceiling fans?
  9. wkpoor

    wkpoor Minister of Fire

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    Good point oldsparky, might even be easier since its one big open space. My neighbors machine shop is 40x80 and his Hutch Rebel heats it fantastically.
  10. dumbodog00

    dumbodog00 New Member

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    It will be a lot easier to heat if there is a ceiling instead of being open up to the roof.
  11. Danno77

    Danno77 Minister of Fire

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    Wait, are you living in a camper that's parked in a pole barn?

    Anyway, 2500sq feet of a barn tall enough to have a camper in it is gonna be much harder to heat than a 2500 square foot house, but at least it's probably more of an open floor plan! BUT it all depends on where you are in the world. did I miss your location?

    Edit: lebanon Ohio. Got it.
  12. wkpoor

    wkpoor Minister of Fire

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    My buds shop has 12' high ceiling and I'm telling you it is amazingly warm. I mean like 80 degrees when its 10 outside and blowing. I've seen his shop door open and him in there with a short sleeve tee shirt on behind the lathe 30' from the stove. So I know it can be done. Albeit he has a huge old smoke dragon providing the heat source.
  13. oldspark

    oldspark Guest

    Maybe he should have put Osburn 2400 in the thread title, I looked up the stove and I think it is up for the task or do you believe he needs a bigger stove.
  14. kingquad

    kingquad Minister of Fire

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    I'd buy the big Drolet. Large firebox like the Osburn, made by the same company (SBI), and cheaper.
  15. mcdanie1

    mcdanie1 New Member

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    Thank you for all the responses! Now, to answer some questions and provide some background...

    1. Yes, we will be living in a camper parked in a pole barn :) Last may we lucked out and found some land located inside a 16,000 acre state forest. There only building on the property now is a horse stable (not big enough to live in). The property has lots of trees and a pond. We recently have added horses to the mix, hey we already had a stable right?, and we currently have our camper parked out there. We figured the camper is going to get a tight, wife and three kids, in the cold months of winter , but its a great place to sleep. So... If we build a pb and park the camper inside, we will make a living room and eating are inside the barn and have sleeping quarters in the camper. We don't want to build a house right away as we want to spend time there first and figure out where would be the best location and what type would work best. If we have the camper in a heated pb then we don't have to winterize it and will still have all the plumbing functionality built into the camper.

    2. The pb will have 29 gauge metal on ceiling with insulation above.

    After calling around locally, and from the dealers listed on the Osburn website my resources for an Osburn do not seem to be very plentiful. So I started doing research on other options and the Napoleon 1900 seems like a very good alternative. Judging from the numbers it may heat the space bit better than the Osburn 2400. Any thoughts on this? I know a guy locally that sells Napoleons and as well as couple other brands (Buck, etc...) Looks like he can get me the 1900with brushed nickel trim, blower, outside fresh air kit and the cook top option that replaces the trivet for $2300. I checked Dynamite Buys and they were $2100 for the same setup, but for $200 I will support the local guy. He is a one man sweep and is very easy to work with.

    3. Yes, a couple ceiling fans are planned as well.

    So what do you guys think?

    Much appreciated,

    Mac
  16. Danno77

    Danno77 Minister of Fire

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    Can't hurt to try it!

    I'm confused by this "found land in a sate park" thingy of which you speak. If it's a state park, then you can't build there, no? Or does the state park surround, but not include, this land?
  17. mcdanie1

    mcdanie1 New Member

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    The land is surrounded on all four sides by state forest. What we have is privately owned, nicely nestled inside the SF boundaries. We lucked out! It a unique situation but if you look on maps.google.com at any given state forest, you will see they are green and if there is private land within the green, it will be white. Thats how it is here in Ohio anyways. And yes, because we own the land we can build basically whatever we like. Another bonus is that the county we are in does not have ANY type of building code requirements, unless you put in a septic system, then you must have that inspected. We were VERY surprised by all this, but we're rollin' with it :)
  18. gasavage

    gasavage Member

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    I have a 36 x 40 X 10 pole barn with r15 walls, r5 roof (I know I need more...planned), open rafters, with a concrete floor. I have a NC30, with blower & ceiling fan, in there to take the chill off. I find it easy to get the room temp to 55 from the mid 30's in few hours. I don't heat it full time, only when I'm working on a project. It's never been below 32 in there.....I make sure of that firing up the stove every now & then when the outdoor temps get into the teens. The concrete floor is a BIG heat sink, thus it takes a while to warm up, then again a while to cool off.

    What you're proposing is very doable. The floor ( heat sink ) is what you'll be battling most. If you start early & stay ahead you'll be ok....it takes a while playing catch up if you're shooting for the 60 - 70 deg range. A large, non cat stove, with blower, will be needed. 2 ceiling fans will assist in air movement. Another suggestion...check into an epa wood furnace.

    Here's an interior pic...no fire in stove

    Attached Files:

  19. Danno77

    Danno77 Minister of Fire

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    That sure sounds like a sweet deal!
  20. oldspark

    oldspark Guest

    That sounds like fun and you are one lucky man to find such a deal, gasavage has a good point about the concrete floor (i assume it is not insulated) and extra capacity with the wood burner will be a plus, the fact you have a large open area (my house is the same way) you will not roast your self out very easy so go big young man go big. How bad are the winters there?
  21. Danno77

    Danno77 Minister of Fire

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    This is more what I figured it would be like for the OP. I wonder if it would be feasible to consider two stoves to get him there (and use during really cold temps) and the one big stove to hold it there.
  22. oldspark

    oldspark Guest

    I hope you have nice dry wood to burn.
  23. mcdanie1

    mcdanie1 New Member

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    Pretty sure the furnaces require electricity to some degree, whereas a simple wood stove does not. I struggled with this part of the decision for some time, as radiant heat in the concrete floor sounds fantastic, but don't want to have to have electricity to run the pump. On an up side, the Nap 1900 appears to also have a cook top insert to replace the trivet and give you a cook surface in the event of a power outage.

    Thank you,

    Mac
  24. oldspark

    oldspark Guest

    That 1900 looks like a great stove and the fact you can get it in your area is a big plus but this one I like a lot (for your application) but have no idea what people think of these. http://www.buckstove.com/wood/model94nc.html
  25. tcassavaugh

    tcassavaugh Minister of Fire

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    "If we have the camper in a heated pb then we don’t have to winterize it and will still have all the plumbing functionality built into the camper."

    Mcdanie1, Just wondering....i noticed this in your post and that you need to have a septic system inspected. Do you have one yet....do you have a well to hook the camper to or pull water from or do you have to drive it to the local campground/drop off to empty your non grey-water materials. if you have to move it every couple of days...and you are in the middle of the state forest, you might have a problem with snow and getting out.

    just a thought

    cass

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