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Hello, newbie needs an assist

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by Ruck, Apr 7, 2013.

  1. Ruck

    Ruck New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2013
    Messages:
    4
    Loc:
    South of Temecula CA
    Hi, I'm Ruck. I am new to the forum (1st post) but have been burning wood to heat for most of my life. I am currently almost finished building a small home (1206' +attached garage) on 2.5 rural acres. I am off grid (no grid tie) and will be heating entirely with wood. I found a great deal on a stove, but I have instal questions and hope you all can help me.

    I picked up a Dutchwest (Vermont Castings) model #2462. This XL unit is obviously way more BTU than my small house needs, but I only paid $500 and it's in brand new condition, except for the 2' section of ash lip that is broken off, hence the deep discount. It came with the manual, and even the broke off piece.

    I will provide information to help answer my questions:
    The #2462 has an oval outlet instead of round. The manual states I use 8" pipe. On venting pipe.com, I found the "Duravent #8870," 9-3/4 X 5-1/4 oval to round adapter. These dimensions don't seem to be EXACT match for my stove, but are VERY close & may be how I measured is wrong. The description actually states, "
    Use on Vermont Casting appliances with oval flue collars to adapt to round pipe."
    My question is- Is this the correct adapter?

    Here is a link to the part I am describing-
    http://www.ventingpipe.com/duravent...-round-double-wall-stovepipe-adapter/p1760875

    Next concern/question- I had to go ahead and buy the Duravent ceiling support box because my carpenter needed to box in the ceiling opening so I can go forward with the drywall instal. My ceiling where the stove pipe will go through is open (no attic), 2"x10" framed. So all there is, is drywall, the 2"x10", insulation, roof sheeting, and composite roofing shingles. I bought this support box-
    http://www.ventingpipe.com/duravent...y-pipe-24-square-ceiling-support-box/p1762821
    My question is- Is this the correct support box?

    I am not drywalled yet and the carpenter comes Tuesday. I can still return/exchange if needed.

    Moving on- I will have a wood mantle. I realize this means I cannot use singe wall pipe between the stove and the ceiling support box unless I intend to have the center of the stove pipe 17" inches away from the combustible wood mantle. No way I want the stove that far out from the wall. Besides, I am ok with any heat loss due to double wall inside the living space because the stove itself is rated for a house 2 times the size of mine and my climate is moderate.
    My question is- What would be the correct Duravent pipe to instal between the flue collar adapter and the ceiling support box? This question is of course entirely dependent upon whether or not I have bought the correct ceiling support box, and have the correct oval to round adapter in mind.

    I hope that I have provided enough information to assist me. Thank you.

    Edited to add: If anybody knows of a good source for these materials cheaper, I'd be interested. In the searching I did do, it seems that these are fair and competitive prices.

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  2. webby3650

    webby3650 Master of Fire

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2008
    Messages:
    4,371
    Loc:
    southern Indiana
    Welcome to the Forum.
    It sounds like you are moving in the right direction. That ceiling box is just fine, and the oval adapter is the correct one. I will add that it is often hard to get on the stove just right, but it will go.

    You will actually be more efficient with the double wall pipe, and you won't notice any less heat.
    I'm not sure if the stove can be much closer than 18" from the wall anyway, so maybe single wall would work out after all. Do you know how close the stove can be to the combustible wall? That stove doesn't have very close clearances.
  3. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

    Joined:
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    Messages:
    47,447
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    South Puget Sound, WA
    A cathedral support box is the correct item. Try dynamitebuys for pipe. Ask for Sean and ask what he has for an oval flue adapter to the DVL double-wall connector pipe. Or go single wall, with a pipe shield for the mantle area. According to the stove manual the rear clearances are a little tighter for the single-wall pipe (14") with a rear heat shield on the stove than for double-wall (19").

    http://www.dynamitebuys.com/store/cart.php?m=product_list&c=51
    http://www.amazon.com/Imperial-Group-BM0133-Adjustable-Shield/dp/B000DZQR3Q
  4. webby3650

    webby3650 Master of Fire

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    southern Indiana
    Isn't that odd! I see alot of stoves that state clearances that way. Where double wall has a 6" clearance and single wall with a shield is 9", but somehow they get them tested and approved to be closer with single wall and the shield. I think it's because of the unprotected flue collar. With the heat shield, it can protect the flue collar area if it's allowed to hang lower, but no special instructions are laid out in the manual.
  5. Ruck

    Ruck New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2013
    Messages:
    4
    Loc:
    South of Temecula CA
    webby, my stove manual says 17" from center of flue collar to any combustible. I will have solid rock up the wall behind the stove to about 5' height. The guy who sold me the stove does stove installs, but I don't trust him. He told me that I cannot count the 5" of mortar and rock (hearth wall) as part of the 17" from a combustible. Said I'd need to be 17" from the rock. But my brother is a building inspector and he tells me the guy is full of crap. says the "combustable" is the wood frame behind the rock wall & 5/8th sheet rock.

    The problem with clearance is my wood mantle. It will stick out 11" off the drywall, capping the 5' rock wall. This is why I am going double wall right off the stove. I'd much rather have NO STOVE PIPE in front of the mantle, but my situation is not suitable for exiting out the wall below the mantle.

    Thanks for the response.
  6. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Your brother is right, he's full of it. The measurement for distance to combustible will be to the stud wall behind the rock.
    webby3650 likes this.
  7. webby3650

    webby3650 Master of Fire

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    You are much better off going up and out! We see a few stoves a year that can't easily be replaced with a new one because they chose to do a rear exit when they built the house. No new stoves fit that exit height without modifications. Not to mention that it will draw much better!
    dougand3 likes this.
  8. dougand3

    dougand3 Minister of Fire

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    North Alabama
    Can you post pics? I think I'd forego the mantle. Rock wall, handsome stove, black pipe straight up would look great.
  9. rideau

    rideau Minister of Fire

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    I remember Fossil stating in an earlier thread that unless the non-combustibles attached to a combustible were substantial, the non-combustibles did not buy you reduced clearance; a substantial noncombustible wall directly attached to combustibles however does buy you some reduction in clearances per a list, and the sample he quoted was 3 1/2 inch brick buying a 33 % reduction. Does 5 inches of stone and mortar buy a similar reduction?
  10. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Technically yes, it should reduce clearances up to a third. But the regs tend to deal with simple, reproducible manufactured products like brick and cement. Stone becomes a grey area, my guess is that's because of the variance in conductivity for different types of stone.
  11. Ruck

    Ruck New Member

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    My first thought was, "great, design advice":rolleyes: But you know, you're probably right. Nothing at all to do with distance to combustibles, but just because it probably wouldn't look quite right.

    There's really no pics to post yet that would show anything. I haven't dry walled, so there's no stone or mantle installed.
  12. Ruck

    Ruck New Member

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    Loc:
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    Ok, now I AM confused. I wasn't even thinking about looking for a REDUCTION in clearance!!! BTW- my rock is solid real rock, not manufactured rock. Are you guys saying that I may get up to a 1/3, reduction in the 17" away that center of flue collar needs to be from the wood frame? In other words, does this mean that I may be able to go down to say 11" clearance from the combustibles behind the stone? OR.... are you guys saying I may be only to utilize 1/3 of the 5" width of the rock & mortar as part of my 17" clearance?
  13. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    That is going to be up to the inspecting authority. A 3.5" masonry wall can net a 33% reduction in clearance to combustibles. If they approve the stone, then you are ok for the reduction. I wouldn't use sheetrock behind the stone. Instead I would use Durock NextGen cement board as the substrate on the walls. It will be a better base and adds a layer of protection.

    http://www.hearth.com/econtent/index.php/wiki/NFPA_Wall_Clearance_Reductions/

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