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Help building my shed

Post in 'DIY and General non-hearth advice' started by fran35, Feb 2, 2012.

  1. fran35

    fran35 Member

    Joined:
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    PA
    Hey everyone,
    I wanted some advice. I am planning to build a shed, 16 x 20 to house my lawn and gardening stuff and maybe some woodworking stuff. My plan is to build the shed floor quickly and easily on top of a dozen or so 6 x 6s and then just through the plywood floor down on top of that. I will then build the walls with 2 x 4s and attach them to the floor. Does any of this sound unreasonable to you guys? I realize I could pour a nice slab for the base, but I just do not have the money for that right now and was figuring the pressure treated skids would work. Also, I was think that when I did have the money, I could move the shed(since it is on skids) on to the slab.

    I have a good source of lumber at a builders auction and figure materials for the shed will cost under 1000.

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  2. nate379

    nate379 Guest

    I built the same exact size shed last year, and even with all the wood for free building for it under $1000 would be tough.

    The more expensive items that I can think of...$900 for roofing (shingles, nails, tar paper, ice/water shield, drip edge), $650 for the 2 doors (people and vehicle) $1200 for the siding.

    I built all the trusses, had I bought them it was about $950.
  3. Don2222

    Don2222 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2010
    Messages:
    7,079
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    Salem NH
    Hello

    I just built a shed this year. The materials were $4500 but that includes $500 for all the electrical (10-20 Amp AC Outlets 5 on each circuit) including the 95 foot 10-3 UF-B underground feed and 2 - 20 Amp circuit sub panel and alarm, tel and cable tv wires.

    See all the shed pics and info here.
    http://www.hearth.com/econtent/index.php/forums/viewthread/77731/

    Shed Electrical pics and info here.
    http://www.hearth.com/econtent/index.php/forums/viewthread/84387/

    That does not count the cost of the TV or Wood Pellet Stove and tiled hearth for a little heat!

    I still plan to insulate it also.

    Attached Files:

  4. 19FarmHand78

    19FarmHand78 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2012
    Messages:
    35
    Loc:
    South East Iowa
    You might want to think about a post frame building, use with a dirt floor for now, then poor concrete in the building when funds are available. I’ve built hundreds of post frame buildings this way. (Family has been in the post frame business since the early 70’s)

    I’m not sure if a $1000 would cover costs of materials on a 16x20x8. The chicken coop I built for my wife 2 years ago is 6’ wide by 12’ long x 8’ high with a one way roof, on skids… and even with scrounged steel roofing/siding I had around $500 in it.

    I’m all for saving $$ and I have learned to scrounge buildings together, but for a building you want to use for many years it is better to save up for it and build it right. And always check for local building codes.

    19FarmHand78
    Nathan
  5. Lumber-Jack

    Lumber-Jack Minister of Fire

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    Beautiful British Columbia
    I'd skip the wooden floor. Wooden floors will eventually rot, and the hollow area underneath is a harbour for all kinds of vermin.
    Why do you want to move it?
    If money is tight right now just pour a concrete curb footing around the perimeter for the walls to sit on, and just live with a dirt floor, or lay some gravel down for now. Later, when you have the money, you have the option to pour a concrete floor. If you have access to a small cement mixer 4-6 bags of cement (plus the nessasary gravel and sand) would probably be more then enough to pour a 16 ft X 20 ft x 6" curb.
  6. firefighterjake

    firefighterjake Minister of Fire

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    I did something similar with a couple of sheds I built out back . . . they're smaller . . . I think 10 x 12 or something like that. I personally would recommend getting the wood up off the ground (even with pressure treated) and use some patio concrete blocks . . . it may allow critters to get underneath, but it will help preserve your wood longer. You can also save some money if you can find a local sawmill selling rough-cut lumber . . . and if you go with board and batting for the outside and build your own doors . . . it's a little more rustic, but saves on money.
  7. Stegman

    Stegman Feeling the Heat

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    Sterling, MA
    I built a 8x12 shed this past summer and put it up on patio blocks above a gravel base. Haven't had any problems with critters, fortunately.

    I used PT 2x6s for the floor and t1-11 for the siding and scored a free pre-hung door and windows from my brother-in-law, but it still cost me about $1,500 for materials. It way better built than the Home Depot sheds though, which would have cost about the same.

    Here's a picture of it 95 percent complete.

    Attached Files:

  8. fran35

    fran35 Member

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    PA
    Wow, I guess my estimates may be a bit off. There is a builder excess auction here where I can get the doors, windows, shingles and lumber at roughly 50%. Maybe I will build a little smaller of a shed if the cost is that high.
  9. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

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    You WILL be sorry down the road. Mark my words.

    Also - if in your position I would seriously consider the post made above. It will give you a very nice finished building and you can do the cement work when it fits your schedule.

    Re-post:
    Just one dudes opinion.
  10. fran35

    fran35 Member

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    Might consider the post frame option over gravel. Is metal roofing or asphalt shingles cheaper?
  11. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

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    Shingles require a substrate, metal does not. You would have to do the math of the available components.
  12. 19FarmHand78

    19FarmHand78 Member

    Joined:
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    Loc:
    South East Iowa
    Another advantage of post frame is that you can adjust post setting to the length of lumber you pick up at the auction, for the most part post are set 8' or 10' on center (OC) but if you can go down to 4' or 6' OC. And since your wanting to save $$ you don't have to have custom trusses built (you can build your own to) just use a "header" on the side walls from post to post and set rafters on that. And as for posts, most builders today use columns, 3-2x6's glued together is the slandered and are stronger and straighter then a treated 6x6.

    I cant say for sure that you can not build a 16x20 for $1000 if lumber is bought cheep, could be done, but the biggest cost I think would be the metal roofing/siding.

    As for building smaller to fit your pocket book better, I would advise not to. Of all the buildings we have built, I have never had a customer say to me at completion "I think we built it to big". Most of the time when the crew gets the framing done and you can stand inside it, 80% of the customers say "we should have built bigger" Get an idea of what you want to store in your building, and work space you would like to have, the go out and mark out your 16x20 and get a feel for it, heck you can even start parking your yard equipment in there to better see it. Space gets used up quick in a new building. But if you see that you can go smaller, or yoour building site just can not hold that size of building, then go from there.

    19FarmHand78
    Nathan
  13. ironpony

    ironpony Minister of Fire

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    depending on budget and DIY ability
    you could build it big enough for what you need to accomplish right now
    and add on in a couple years, planning ahead for addition
    I have done it both ways
    and no building is ever big enough
    the more room the more stuff you acquire
    6+ car garage and shed and I need more room
    not really need less "stuff"
  14. Jack Straw

    Jack Straw Minister of Fire

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    I was in a pole barn that had a stone dust floor which was very nice. It's hard like concrete and if your equipment leaks a little oil it's no big deal.
  15. fran35

    fran35 Member

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  16. lukem

    lukem Minister of Fire

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    A post frame building with a dirt floor and metal roof is about as cheap as you can go, and it usually turns out to be one of the better buildings. Side it with whatever suits your style (board and baton, T111, metal, beer cans...ok maybe not beer cans).

    When you save up some extra scratch, pouring a floor in there is not a hard job. Finishing is a little tricky because the siding makes it harder to reach everything, so you need to use knee boards, but still not impossible.
  17. bogydave

    bogydave Minister of Fire

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    +1
    Smaller will just make you wonder why you ever did that. !!!! IMO, don't go there :)
    Lots of ways to save on the initial cost. Corner posts & a roof, gravel floor. Dry storage is premium!! Can add side, back & walls, doors & upgrade the floor later if needed.
    I did roll roofing, cheapest here.
    Good luck.
    SMALLER :bug: LOL :lol:
  18. Swedishchef

    Swedishchef Minister of Fire

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    Funny thing is that I am looking at building a 16X20 as well. I am estimating costs to be around $5000 for materials. I had priced out a 12X16 but I know I will run out of room. I am simply putting it down on top of 8 inches of 0-3/4 clean stone (same type as used for a drain tile). The siding, shingles and larger lumber (16 foot 2X8s for the floor), etc is where they get you in the sweets. The siding I want (to match the house) is $1 per square foot. So I have $500 or so in siding. That's not including J channel, posts, soffit, facia, etc.

    Keep me posted on how you make out!

    Quite the fancy shed stegman!!! Very nice!

    Andrew
  19. Don2222

    Don2222 Minister of Fire

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    Hey Stegman

    Glad to see our Dueling sheds are done! Congrats! I like those Stones and landscape lumber, very professional looking!!

    So what else are you going to do to finish it?

    Mine is all primed but have to paint it in the spring.

    Attached Files:

  20. Stegman

    Stegman Feeling the Heat

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    Hey Don.

    That looks pretty sweet. I like the gray. Are you going to paint it roughly the same color? And is that door of yours looks sweet. It appears wider than a standard size door.

    I don't have much left to do - just the gable soffits and corner trim and the big window on the other end - another freebie from my brother-in-law. I also have to lay some plywood down over the cross-ties to get some additional storage space up underneath the rafters. Probably another weekend or two of work. I have to say, we got real lucky with the weather. I was worried that I wouldn't get as far along as I did.
  21. Don2222

    Don2222 Minister of Fire

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    Thanks Stegman, yours does too!

    I skipped the gable vents and put in soffit vents and a ridge vent. It holds the heat much better this way when heating in the winter.Also, I skipped the collar ties and went with an LVL cathedral ceiling. Then added an open loft that can sleep 2 and watch the TV. LOL

    I may paint it the light grayish blue to match the house with white trim in the spring. Then put in the rope light under the soffit and hookup to the light switch installed in the house.

    We both got real lucky with the weather!!!

    Attached Files:

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