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Help me identify this stove?

Post in 'Classic Wood Stove Forums (prior to approx. 1993)' started by Riteheer, Feb 1, 2012.

  1. Riteheer

    Riteheer New Member

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    I was just given this stove by some relatives who bought a new mobile home and can't use it. I'm sure it's a Fisher copy, but I would really like to find a replacement blower for it.
    I bought my first load of wood, and not knowing much, I got a lot of green walnut, if I get some good seasoned wood to burn in with it, will that get my heat up to where it should be? I bought a magnetic thermometer for the pipe, put it about 6 to 8 inches up the pipe from the first turn, but other than a couple of times of gettting it to 425 F, I can't seem to get it over 300. I have a flue damper that I leave wide open, and the two damper vents in the front door are cranked open, but just can't seem to get the heat up. I'm using the stove to heat my wood shop/ garage.
    I appreciate any and all help and advice you can give me.
    Rite

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  2. Dune

    Dune Minister of Fire

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    Blower motor should be a stock item, i.e., not specific to stove manufacturer.
    Green wood will not give you much heat.
    Nor will leaving vents and draft damper fully open. That will just give you a hot chimney.
  3. Riteheer

    Riteheer New Member

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    I understand there are universal blower motors, but to keep from having to modify the mounting system, I thought it would be easiest if I could find the original blower and replace it with that.
    Not being at all familiar with wood stoves and the process, I'm reading as much as my eyes can take in, would you kindly offer some advice on the best practice to get a fire going and keep it at optimal heat in this stove?
  4. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Looks like a Fisher knockoff perhaps. The blowers on this style stove often were stock items. Is there a blower on it now? If so look for labels on the motor identifying the brand and model. Can you show pictures of it?
  5. Riteheer

    Riteheer New Member

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    I'm sure it is a Fisher knockoff, but there are no markings to give me any hints... same almost goes for the sticker on the motor, it's very difficult to read, only part of it is legible at all...
    Says it's a Dayton motor, 1/3 hp, has a variable rpm of about 100 that is about 3000. Most of the other information on the label is very difficult to read.
    I will take a picture of the motor when I get home and post it. I took it apart in hopes that cleaning it up and putting it back together it might work, but no go.... from what I understand, my relatives quit using the blower about 3 or 4 years ago.
  6. Dune

    Dune Minister of Fire

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    Grainger sells Dayton. You could also luck out and find one from Surplus Center (Burden Sales) for shorter money.

    As to getting a good hot fire, green wood will not work.

    Asuming you can secure some dry wood, start your fine, with the flue damper full open and the door dampers pretty far open as well. Use small pieces with the goal being to establish a bed of coals.
    Let it roar for a bit and feed some more wood. When the stove gets up to temp, (450 or more) dial down the door dampers about halfway. Wait a few minutes then dial them in some more.
    Exact setting will vary depending upon size of load, size of logs, temperature differential (inside vs outside) as well as wind direction and speed and likely atmospheric pressure as well.

    Finaly, having established a good bed of coals and a fairly full flaming firebox, at cruising temp, start to slowly close the damper. You likely never need to fully close it, but again many variables will affect the setting.

    If you get to the point of using the flue damper, be sure to fully open the flue damper before opening the stove door. I usally boost the inlet air before opening the door (I don't use a flue damper)
    to get the draft kicked up a bit, and prevent smoke from spilling into the house.
  7. Riteheer

    Riteheer New Member

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    Dune,
    That is awesome! I have made arrangements to get some good seasoned wood, mostly oak. I'll be playing with it this weekend. I truly appreciate you taking the time to help me out. Now I realize some of the problems I was creating with my ignorance. I was looking for flames, not coals... and once I had the temp up, instead of closing door dampers, I was closing the flu down... usually only got down about 50%, but never got to the point of closing the door dampers... the green wood made everything even more difficult.
    Thank you so very much, and I'll check out both of those sites for a blower motor.
  8. Dune

    Dune Minister of Fire

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    You are more than welcome. Good luck and don't be a stranger arround here.
  9. Riteheer

    Riteheer New Member

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    Ok, I got some seasoned wood. It burns a little better, obviously, but I'm still not able to get it regulated to a good hot fire. This is what I've tried.
    I get the fire going pretty quick, it gets up to a flew temp of about 400 to 425, at this point, I have tried a couple of things... I tried just leaving it alone, and it doesn't take more than 30 mins or so and the temp is back down to about 300, I've tried turning the vents in door in a little or even turning them down quite a bit.... either way same result, I get about 30 mins or so and the temp is down.... I have done all this with the flue wide open in the pipe. If I open the door and stir things up a bit and keep feeding more wood, I can keep the temp between 350 and 425, but it rarely gets any hotter than that. The wood I'm burning is most oak that's been sitting since last year early in the year and some of it is even 2 years old. There is some hickory in with it, but no soft woods...
    I'm kind of perplexed, everyone who has seen the size of this stove told me that I would never need a blower... I am using it in my garage. 20' x 24' metal building on a concrete pad.... there is no insulation, but we haven't really even suffered many cold days at all...
    I bought a replacement motor online, I was able to get one thru Sears cheaper than anyone else. It meets all the specs of the old motor, accept that it's a 1/15 hp and the old one was 1/30 hp, so I think I should use less electricity with the new one. AFter putting the blower on I have been able to get my temp in the garage up to about 62F, but I think my ignorance is playing a part in keeping me from getting it warmer in there.
    Everyone who has used wood stoves, says I should have to open my door to the garage to get it cooled down....
  10. kettensäge

    kettensäge Feeling the Heat

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    Did you try closing or partially closing it with the dryer wood?
  11. Dune

    Dune Minister of Fire

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    Your wood is still wet. One year old oak is not seasoned, two years is barely seasoned most places. Can you find some old grey pallets to try as a means of eliminating the wet wood variable? It also sounds like you have pretty weak draft. What is your flue setup?
  12. webby3650

    webby3650 Master of Fire

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    400-425 is not a hot flue by any means. A mag. thermometer only reads the surface temp, or only 2/3 of the actual temp. With an old non EPA stove or a new one for that matter, you should be able to get 900 degrees without a problem. You shouldn't try for this but it should be possible. Go get some bundled wood from the grocery store, or like was mentioned earlier, cut up some old pallets and see what happens. What is the flue like? Maybe you aren't getting a good draw?
  13. webbie

    webbie Seasoned Moderator Staff Member

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    I should chirp in and say you'll never find parts (blower) for it which are from the original maker. No big deal. This is one of hundreds of regional and local stove brands made during the boom of 1978-1980.

    Most all of the stove makers back then actually did get their motors - stock - from Graingers. Them may have added a var-speed in house or a housing......but the motor and blower was usually stock.

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