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Help picking new stove/furnace...

Post in 'The Boiler Room - Wood Boilers and Furnaces' started by mu1166, Dec 16, 2007.

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  1. slb2782

    slb2782 New Member

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    .[youtube] d[/youtube]

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  2. gpcollen1

    gpcollen1 Minister of Fire

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    Anyone have a price range for those furnaces or have an idea on the price of a specific model?
  3. mu1166

    mu1166 New Member

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    From what I have found, it looks like the cheapest model that I have found was at Menards for $700 (looks(maybe it isn't, I don't know) like a cheaper unit, made by DAKA) up to over $3,000 for a Caddy (which looks like one hell of a nice furnace).
  4. gpcollen1

    gpcollen1 Minister of Fire

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    Any clue what the Englander goes for?
  5. Gooserider

    Gooserider Mod Emeritus

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    Not sure exactly, but IIRC it's on the order of about a grand. In years past a few folks have gotten big time savings by taking advantages of the big-box clearance sales, and / or use of their savings coupons.

    Gooserider
  6. mu1166

    mu1166 New Member

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    I finally went to look at the old Royall furnace.

    Something that caught my eye was it looks like the actuall furnace has been cut in half and then welded back together. What woud someone do this for? It kind of scares me so I think I will leave that one where it sits.
  7. mu1166

    mu1166 New Member

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    I have still been looking at multiple furnaces (online since no stores close to me). I am pretty sure that I will be going to 'furnace' route since I will not be using the existing concrete block chimney on the south side of the house and instead will be putting a liner in the existing masonary chimney that sits in my furnace room next to my nat. gas furnace. The masony looks excellent, just waiting to get a price on what the cost of the liner will be. I am assuming that I need the dual wall stainless liner for it? It is going to take close to 33 feet to get to the top. The masonary chimney does not have a liner in it now (2 chimneys, neither with a liner in this house), and it is 9" square (inside to inside). Will I be able to put a round liner up through the chimney?

    Now back to the furnace questions. Some manufactures say to run parallel, some series, some both. Anyone have any experience on which way is the best to run them? With my new and improved location (right beside my existing furnace) I will have the options of running it either way. Does one way work better than the other? Just looking for some real work experience's.

    Are there any opinions on the 'draft' blower option on many of the furnaces? I am not sure if I want/need this option or not.
  8. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson Mod Emeritus

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    If you're lining an existing brick chimney, then you need a single-wall stainless steel pipe with insulation either wrapped around it or poured in around it.

    If you're running a new stainless steel chimney, then you need double-wall stainless steel Class A chimney like a Duratech. The inside run can be the cheaper version with galvanized steel on the outside layer rather than stainless. Parts exposed to the elements should be stainless, mainly for aesthetic reasons.

    I'm sure somebody else can detail the best way to pipe in an add-on furnace. Bear in mind that if you blow hot air into your existing gas furnace, you run the risk of losing some of your heat up the chimney, unless there is an adequate damper installed. And that's a bad thing from an efficiency point of view.

    Draft blowers, in my experience, make it much easier to operate a furnace or a boiler. They're more responsive if you can control the air getting to the fire directly.
  9. mu1166

    mu1166 New Member

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    I will be lining the existing brick chimney. There is no liner in the chimney at the moment.
  10. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson Mod Emeritus

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    If you have a straight shot, rigid ss sections wrapped with ceramic insulation is the way to go. If you have an offset or some other obstacle, then you'll probably need a flex liner. Wrapped insulation is probably still the way to go, but you can pour in a cement-based vermiculite insulation mixture--as long as their arent' any gaps between the bricks. Not sure how much of this you want to tackle on your own, if any. Another (more expensive but probably superior) option would be to have a ceramic liner poured into your unlined chimney.
  11. mu1166

    mu1166 New Member

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    The chimney is as straight as you can get. I don't know if I will try it myself or not. I'm pretty handy around the house but have never tried this before. I do know a copule people who have done a few chimenys though. Depends on how much the plumbing and heating place is going to charge me. I will have to see what they recommend, etc.


    Thanks for the responses.

    I just found out that our little wood cutting group just got another grove to raid. Went out to look and there are 35 good sized oak trees and about 60 red elm trees. I love free wood and it's not always the easiest to come by in farm ground country....
  12. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson Mod Emeritus

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    You'll probably get more chimney advice than you can handle if you start a thread on the topic in the Hearth Room.
  13. mu1166

    mu1166 New Member

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    Thanks for the reply. I started a topic over there so we will see what come from it.

    Now the search continues for a furnace. There are just so many different brands out there...
  14. mu1166

    mu1166 New Member

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    I still haven't decided on which furnace to get. With these temperatures I wish that I had it done before this winter.

    My question is about ductwork cleareance. Most of the manuals that I have read online (only ones that I have read) state a 2" clearance on ductwork. My ductwork is installed an average of 7/8 to 1 1/8" below my floor joists. Is there anyway that I can insulate this to make it meet the manufactures specs in the manual?

    My clearances are starting to get so close that I am not sure I want to go this route anymore. I may just end up getting a new stove in the basement if I can hopefully heat more of the house than just the basement with it.
  15. Gooserider

    Gooserider Mod Emeritus

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    You pretty much have to have the required space clearances between the ductwork and anything combustible, especially in the area close to the furnace. This is to allow any excess heat in the ducts to dissipate w/o bringing the surrounding materials over the ducts up to an excess temperature, especially in the "worst case" scenario of having a power failure just as a fresh load of wood is reaching it's peak burn temps...

    You MIGHT be able to gain some clearance room by putting a non-combustible (i.e. sheet metal) shield on spacers between the duct and the combustibles (sort of like an NFPA wall shield in a stove install) but I'm not sure if that is OK, or how much extra clearances it will gain you.

    Gooserider
  16. mu1166

    mu1166 New Member

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    I understand where they are coming from. I was just looking for any other options that I might have. I am able to lower the ducts and plenum at the existing furnace but when the clearance goes to 2", is the area where I am not going to be able to lower them any (they are in a finished ceiling). Since all my clearances are so close, i'm starting to think that I will just go with a wood stove in the 'finished' part of the basement. I don't know how much of the heat will radiate up to the upper 2 levels of the house. The stairwell is on the other side of the basement which head to my kitchen. I will try and get a floor plan drawn to see what the general consensous is.

    thanks for all the info.
  17. Hogwildz

    Hogwildz Minister of Fire

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    If you have the cash, do yourself a favor and run pre-insulated double wall. Easy to run & less headache if you have the room & cash. By the time you run single wall and sleeve it in insulation, its not that much more for the pre-insulated double wall.
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