1. Welcome Hearth.com Guests and Visitors - Please enjoy our forums!
    Hearth.com GOLD Sponsors who help bring the site content to you:
    Hearthstone Soapstone and Cast-Iron stoves( Wood, Gas or Pellet Stoves and Inserts)
    Caluwe - Passion for Fire and Water ( Pellet and Wood Hydronic and Space Heating)

Help Save Tree

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by timfromohio, Aug 25, 2009.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. timfromohio

    timfromohio Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2007
    Messages:
    520
    We had a storm roll through last week and lost a couple of trees. I have attached some pics of a section of a maple that came down - should I do anything to the exposed area on the main trunk? Any special paint or something similar I should apply to seal it up? Thanks for any advice!

    Attached Files:

    Helpful Sponsor Ads!





  2. zzr7ky

    zzr7ky Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2006
    Messages:
    1,052
    Hi -

    I just use any oil based stuff I have around, but prefer Rustolium. I smooth up anything I can with the saw and then just paint any exposed wood. The strenght of the tree is better preserved from wood rot and insect damage.

    It's worked well. When the kids were 2-4 years old we cut some larger branches and used bright yellow. These HAD to be made into : ) faces! The kids got a kick out of watching "Smiley" get swallowed by the tree over the years.

    ATB,
    Mike P.
  3. waynek

    waynek Member

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2009
    Messages:
    169
    Loc:
    Southern WI
    I respectively disagree with zzr7ky in his suggested tree wound treatment for the most part. I would agree that you should "smooth up anything I can with the saw..." Cut the branch and trim slivers and excess hanging bark to help eliminate bacteria from forming and insects hiding underneath. I often use a handsaw rather than a chainsaw to clean up the wound. Then let nature take over. A tree wound never really heals. It is covered over, with for lack of a better word...a callous. This callous forms at the edges of the wound and over time will completely cover the wound.

    Painting the wound inhibits oxidation and inhibits the callous process. Sure people paint the wounds and the tree survives despite the application in some cases, but I am a high percentage type guy. I put my money on "Mother Nature" everytime.
    Thank you and best regards,
    Jackpine
  4. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2008
    Messages:
    15,972
    Loc:
    Anderson, Indiana
    +1 alot of home owner like to paint the cuts just dont need it (i will paint the ends of a log if its going to the saw mill thats the only time)
  5. Flatbedford

    Flatbedford Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2009
    Messages:
    5,228
    Loc:
    Croton-on-Hudson, suburbs of NYC
    I have read same. Clean the wound, but do not dress it. The tree will take care of itself.
  6. stejus

    stejus Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2008
    Messages:
    1,227
    Loc:
    Central MA
    If you haven't cut it yet, make two separate cuts. One cut about 2 feet away from tree. This cut will get most of the limb out out of the way and leave you with a stub. Then go in again with another cut nice and close to the tree surface to create a smooth cut. If you try to do it with one cut, you run the risk of snapping and pulling away bark.
  7. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2007
    Messages:
    27,816
    Loc:
    Michigan

    I'll disagree except for the cleaning of the wound like jackpine suggests. Get some Tree Kote.


    Tree Kote

    This is the stuff used in orchards to stop damage done to a tree.
  8. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2008
    Messages:
    15,972
    Loc:
    Anderson, Indiana
    grow up on a very large orchard and 15 years tree shrub manger chemlawn tru-green on advertisement's dont changing my mind Its really dont hurt to do it so if it makes you fill better than its a good idea other than that no real benefit's
  9. LLigetfa

    LLigetfa Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2008
    Messages:
    7,348
    Loc:
    NW Ontario
    Small wounds we would just wrap with moss but that one is too big for that. Don't trim the tree too close. Leave at least a 4 inch stub.
  10. zzr7ky

    zzr7ky Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2006
    Messages:
    1,052
    Hi -

    I've 'treated' trees with and without painting the exposed wood. The painted exposed wood stays in place, doesn't get powder post beatles, or worse. It just protects the underlaying wood like the bark will again in time.

    I'm in an area that's very humid all Summer so that may account for better results with painting.

    I suppose the type of tree matters also.

    Does anyone know what is best with american Beach?

    ATB,
    Mike
  11. ctarborist

    ctarborist New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2009
    Messages:
    24
    Loc:
    southern CT
    There is a tremendous amount of controversy and varying opinions regarding tree wound care, here's my opinion for what it's worth... under perfect circumstances a tree will heal itself, this is not a perfect circumstance so some intervention would probably benefit the long term health of the tree. first things first, try to remove that limb as cleanly as possible than see whats left. any time a tree wound has the potential to hold water (think cavity or cup where rain water will collect) there is a strong potential for rot down the road. it looks as though there already was a rot type situation right in the crotch of those limbs you may find some dirt/compost type debris in there already if so then it should be cleaned out carefully and sterilized (and possibly filled). I f not then I would prune it as neatly as possible, spray it thoroughly with rubbing alcohol to kill off any decomposing bacteria/fungi, wait about 3 days and spray it thoroughly with a copper fungicide to help prevent new infection. this will buy the tree time to help keep out infection until the tree has compartmentalized (built up natural barriers to prevent decay). if your trees wound will hold water or is already got some rot in it write back with possibly a pic and I'll walk you through the cavity care deal. hope this helps.

    CT. Arborist and tree surgeon
    Ron
  12. Tree farmer

    Tree farmer New Member

    Joined:
    May 23, 2008
    Messages:
    132
    Loc:
    Central NH
    The only thing I haven't seen mentioned is doing a bark trace. Especially if the portion where the bark was still hanging on is torn after final limb removal. Just take a sharp knife (utility knife with new blade) and create a clean crisp line just in from the torn bark. This creates a clean line for the tree to grow new cells over more easily and ensures you have all the torn cambium off. good luck
  13. Hurricane

    Hurricane Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2009
    Messages:
    565
    Loc:
    Central NJ
    I vote with clean up the break with a clean cut and let mother nature do her thing.
    How did the trees and nature survive before all of these companies were around to profit from all of these miracle cures ?
    I think nature did better before we started helping it.
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page