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Help with E-Classic 3200 Install

Post in 'The Boiler Room - Wood Boilers and Furnaces' started by pasturesaplenty, Oct 2, 2012.

  1. pasturesaplenty

    pasturesaplenty New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2012
    Messages:
    1
    I recently purchased a Central Boiler E-Classic 3200.

    Max btus: 306k
    @ 8hrs: 262k
    @12hrs: 175k

    It will feed into 3 separate structures.

    I am running 1 1/4" thermopex about 2-3' underground and about 160 linear feet into the basement of a large, uninsulated, 1860's farm house. Wood siding. Did I fail to mention the original single pane windows? (approx 3,200sf ... it will be modernized eventually)

    I am running 1" thermopex about 2-3' underground and about 210 linear feet into a small caretakers house (approx 800sf), with some insulation and storm-windows.

    I am running 1" thermopex approximately 25' into a metal quonset hut / workshop which will have a central boiler 210k btu suspended space heater and will only be used occasionally. (approx 1600sf)

    At any rate, I need all the Btus I can get out of this puppy (northern nj, cold winters, near ski areas)

    Can anyone comment if this will even work as described? Efficiency? Do I need to provide more details? Boiler slab already poured, thermopex already laid, and foundations already sleeved. So I can't change much at this point.

    Also, I have a specific question about the big house ... The Central Boiler install diagram shows two heat exchangers, one for the hot water heater and one for my existing oil burner ... I picked up a 50plate heat exchanger from CB, but I can't find a water-to-water heat exchanger (sidearm) for the domestic hot water heater with 1 1/4" side ports ... the biggest I can find is 1 " ... Any thoughts? Alternate ways to install?

    Does it matter if I step down? From 1 1/4" to 1"? The installation diagram shows the hot water feed entering through the sidearm first, before eventually going through the 50 plate heat exchanger into the existing oil fired unit we have (and will keep) as backup.

    I think I bit off more than I can chew, trying to do most of this myself... no local plumbers have dealt with wood furnace installations before.

    Here is a diagram of the water-to-water exchanger: http://www.centralboiler.com/Tech/C100.pdf

    Here is a general diagram of the install for the house: http://www.centralboiler.com/Tech/C220.pdf

    This is on a 200 acre working family farm, appreciate any help.

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  2. stee6043

    stee6043 Minister of Fire

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    Loc:
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    Who laid your thermopex for you? Here in mid-Michigan the frost line is 42". Your "2-3 feet" deep trenches would be rather problematic here and I guess I'd be surprised if NJ isn't similar?

    Your pex sizing is going to be tight as well, based on what I've seen here. How do you split these loads at the boiler? Your house is going to struggle on a 1-1/4" line if it's as drafty as you describe. Your workshop heater will not acheive anythign close to 210k on a 1" pex line without some very, very high flow rates which may be difficult to manage on a line where it shares with two other heat loads.

    I personally would not worry about a 1" sidearm. You shouldn't loose that much flow through that small of a piece. Others will most certainly chime in.

    You've come to the right place. WELCOME! I just hope your choice in thermopex and trenching doesn't hose the rest of your system for life...
  3. harttj

    harttj Member

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    Why does it need to be below the frost line?
  4. goosegunner

    goosegunner Minister of Fire

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    So are you planing on running glycol in the system?

    If you only are heating shed occasionally the lines should be deep and must protect unit heater somehow.

    gg
  5. flyingcow

    flyingcow Minister of Fire

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    northern-half of maine
    Because of elevation, I have Thermopex coming out of my garage(location of boiler) at about 1 ft underground. Than slopes down to about 4t under ground into basement of house.This is in a 35ft run.

    I did put 2 inch foam over top of thermopex as it left the garage for about 8ft. thermopex is good stuff, no noticeable thawing or frost lines. Very rugged stuff.

    Good luck with your E-Classic. Doesn't look like you'll be idling much.

    Welcome to Hearth. Good bunch of people here.
  6. heaterman

    heaterman Minister of Fire

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    Be ready to put up a LOT of wood.

    Your lines won't freeze regardless of depth as long as you maintain circulation. We've done more than a few where we had to stay high due to water table issues and never had a problem provided the underground product used is decent and water tight.
  7. flyingcow

    flyingcow Minister of Fire

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    Loc:
    northern-half of maine
    Curious, did you heat with oil before? If so how much? You need seas
    oned wood with the E-Classic
  8. stee6043

    stee6043 Minister of Fire

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    Loc:
    West Michigan
    It happens with some regularity:

    A new user joins us looking for affirmation that his plan, good or bad, is a great idea. Upon not receiving such affirmation he or she is never to be heard from again.

    I wonder if this will be a one post wonder?
  9. stee6043

    stee6043 Minister of Fire

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    Loc:
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    Does that meet code in Michigan? I was told by someone I believed to be "in the know" that it had to be below frost line to meet code, similar to foundation footings. I'm not an OWB user so I have no personal experience...
  10. heaterman

    heaterman Minister of Fire

    Joined:
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    It doesn't have to be below frost line that I'm aware of. I've seen installations with hot water and even steam lines running above ground on the exterior of buildings. Insulated of course.

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