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hophornbeam (eastern hornbeam) moisture level?

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by pybyr, Jan 31, 2009.

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  1. pybyr

    pybyr Minister of Fire

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    anyone know the above (eastern hornbeam- the one with the shaggy bark)? I have access to a fair amount of it, but am curious about its moisture level and time to season. Despite finding all sorts of data on other woods after extensive Googling, I cannot find moisture %s for this wood. I seem to have pretty good luck even with standing dead stuff cut late last summer, but am curious if I'd get even more of its legendary heat if I am able to let it season longer in future years.

    Thanks

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  2. WOODBUTCHER

    WOODBUTCHER Minister of Fire

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    Eastern Hop Hornbeam (Copper leaf) shares almost idendical Btu's and weight with Hickory.
    Hickory has a very slight upper edge in Recoverable Heat Value per million BTU'S of dry cord wood.
    Hornbeam 19.11
    Hickory 19.39

    My guess is the moisture content can't be much different.

    WB
  3. pybyr

    pybyr Minister of Fire

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    Thanks- I agree that it even looks, inside the logs, a lot like hickory- I'll just be intrigued to get the moisture % data if anyone can point me to it
  4. rphurley

    rphurley Feeling the Heat

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    I believe that hornbeam has a sinewy bark, that is smooth but looks like there is muscles underneath. My hickory looks like oak, or it is shagbark. I do know that hornbeam is very hard wood
  5. rphurley

    rphurley Feeling the Heat

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    Are you referring to Hophornbeam?
  6. pybyr

    pybyr Minister of Fire

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    yes- the hornbeam with the shaggy bark. hard as heck
  7. fyrwoodguy

    fyrwoodguy Feeling the Heat

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    it's know by "ironwood" too.....oxen yoke material.
  8. JustWood

    JustWood Minister of Fire

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    Green moisture content is going to vary depending on where it's growing and soil type. Ideally if you were to cut it or any wood for that matter off the stump in the late fall the wood should be at the lowest green moisture content of any given time during the year.
  9. pybyr

    pybyr Minister of Fire

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    Interesting, Lee- what's the reason that late fall is the lowest MC? I'd never heard that before, but I'd be interested in knowing the rationale. Someone else was trying to claim that right about now, while the trees are dormant for winter, and before sap starts to flow again, is lowest M/C. While I am at it, do you think there's any truth to that claim that when felling trees during the season that they are leaved out, if you wait until the leaves all wilt before limbing them and bucking them, the leaves will take a substantial amount of moisture up and out? Thanks
  10. JustWood

    JustWood Minister of Fire

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    This describes it better than I ever could.

    http://www.earthworksboston.org/articles/OCdormancy.htm


    Basically photosynthesis stops and the tree slows the pumping of water to a minimum.

    Leaf wilt theory. IMO I believe this theory takes minimal moisture out of a tree and what moisture it does remove is only in the branches 2-3" in diameter.
  11. pybyr

    pybyr Minister of Fire

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    Thanks Lee- that harmonizes what you said about fall with what others have said about cutting before trees break dormancy in spring.

    By the way, with Git'Mo anticipated to be closing, where are you gonna go next :) ?
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