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How do I start this saw??

Post in 'The Gear' started by rudysmallfry, Apr 10, 2013.

  1. rudysmallfry

    rudysmallfry Feeling the Heat

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    Ugh...I got a Stihl 180 a few months ago. It's the EZ model. (yeah my butt it's EZ) Anyway, this is my first chainsaw, so I'm probably just doing something stupid. After months of getting sidetracked, I worked up the nerve to try my new saw out. I built myself a sawbuck, got my gloves, chaps, googles, ear protection all lined up and headed out to the pile. I put the saw on the ground and tried to get the level into the cold start position and it will not stay down. It will only stay at 1 or 0. I tried squeezing the throttle trigger thinking it was some sort of combination thing, but same result. Does anyone know what I'm missing? (other than a brain)

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  2. On every stihl I have you hold the throttle while sliding the master lever all the way down. Let go of the throttle while holding the MCL down. And then pull the rope until you hear the pop. Then slide the MCL up one notch to the 3rd position. Pull until it start and then blip the throttle and the MCL will go to the #2 position.
    Adios Pantalones likes this.
  3. HDRock

    HDRock Minister of Fire

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  4. BobUrban

    BobUrban Minister of Fire

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    Wow - that video is exactly as I do it with my Stihl but I certainly do not pull that slow or lightly. that is one "easy start" saw!!

    My husky on the other hand is one cold blooded saw and takes a lot more pulling no matter what I do to get it going from a cold sit.
  5. rudysmallfry

    rudysmallfry Feeling the Heat

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    Thanks guys. I won't have time to visit this again until Monday, but I'll give it another go and report back.
  6. MasterMech

    MasterMech Guest

    Make sure the chain brake is set by pushing the hand guard all the way forward.

    The trigger must be held at full throttle to engage the lever all the way down to the cold start position.

    Pull the saw over until it fires (3-4 pulls MAX, usually 1 or 2)

    Flip the lever up to the half-choke or "warm start" position and pull until the saw starts.

    Bump the throttle trigger once it starts and the saw will settle into a low idle. Do not wait more than 3 seconds to do this.

    Release the brake by pulling the hand guard back until you hear it "click" and you're set to cut.

  7. nate379

    nate379 Guest

    I've never seen a saw pull that easy! I'm not sure my 460 would even without the spark plug in it! haha!

  8. rudysmallfry

    rudysmallfry Feeling the Heat

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    Update...got it started no problem and quickly realized that you guys have been holding out on me. That thing is FUN to use! I can't believe I was that intimidated by it. All I've ever heard from people are how dangerous chainsaws are. It was very easy to use and went through the logs like butter. That being said, about 30 cuts and 20 minutes later, it kinda choked on a larger cherry log. I noticed the chain was slowly moving at idle. I'm guessing it worked itself a little loose? It was hot and I was already done with what I wanted to cut, so I called it a day. Is that normal for new saw chains to need a little tweaking? Also, how often should I be adding chain oil? I noticed it was kind of hissing at me for a minute or two after I shut it off. Thanks for you help guys.
  9. NH_Wood

    NH_Wood Minister of Fire

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    Yes - normal for a new chain to stretch and need adjustment fairly quickly - sounds like you are having fun - be careful! Cheers!
  10. DexterDay

    DexterDay Guest

    Stretch will happen fast with a new chain, and you should topoff the oil, every time you topoff the gas tank.

    Also, if the saw is new, after the saw starts to break in, you may need to lower the idle a touch. After several tanks, the saw will run a little better than it does now.
    Nixon likes this.
  11. HDRock

    HDRock Minister of Fire

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    Be sure to do as Dexter says, topoff the oil, every time you topoff the gas tank.
  12. nate379

    nate379 Guest

    The Stihl chains are pre stretched and usually don't stretch much.

    Chain moving at idle means the idle is set too high.
  13. kopeck

    kopeck Minister of Fire

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    Don't be fooled, they are very dangerous. 99% of the time they're fine, that 1% can be a killer.

    K
  14. Adios Pantalones

    Adios Pantalones Minister of Fire

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    Congrats! New saws need some carb tuning as they break in- read the manual for info on adjustments (simple screws to turn). New chains stretch, as well- so check it every tank, and sharpen often.

    My first saw (still my only) is a Stihl. I made many mistakes in learning it, and have abused it for 8-10 years, but it still screams. Very reliable. My best advice- learn to sharpen the chain right, and do it often- like a touch up every tank.
  15. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

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    Yep - and now the obligatory post on safety:
    Safety is priority one with a chain saw. If you don't already have - you need to get your PPE (personal protection equipment). Chainsaw chaps at the very very least. I have three friends that have ended up in ER for chainsaw related cuts.
  16. Adios Pantalones

    Adios Pantalones Minister of Fire

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    The orange helmet with the face screen and built in ears is nigh indispensable, as well.
    Jags likes this.
  17. paul bunion

    paul bunion Minister of Fire

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    Be sure to clean any dust and chips from the oil cap area before opening it. Just take a rag and wipe it. You dont want any debris to get in and clog things up. I also like to run my saw with the tip pointed at a fresh cut after a fill and look to see that it is splattering a small bit of oil. That way I am sure that oil is flowing.
  18. rudysmallfry

    rudysmallfry Feeling the Heat

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    Thanks for the tips guys. This does seem to be sort of a high maintenance tool, so the more info the better. Don't worry about the 'fun' comment. It doesn't in any way mean that I plan to start swinging from the trees with the thing in my teeth. It's just a lot more simple to use than I thought it would be. I've got all the safety gear and standing well to the side of the thing when it's cutting until I know I've got the hang of it.
  19. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

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    Cool beans. Use it religiously.;)
  20. Joful

    Joful Minister of Fire

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    The primary danger is the top half of the tip. Bad things happen when the top half of the tip hits things. I suspect most kickback incidents occur when working in the thick of a downed tree, or on a pile of logs stacked closely, and the tip of the bar inadvertently contacts some wood other than that which you were intending to cut.

    4374375b.jpg KickbackZone.jpg FH05FEB_CHAINS_02.JPG

    kickback_illustr.gif Chainsaw_Guide-14.jpg
    Nixon likes this.
  21. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    Rudy, I too bought a 180 this year mainly for cutting limbs. It surprised me so that I now find myself reaching for that saw most of the time and leave the heavy one sit. I don't have the easy start but it starts really easy anyway. I also would not call this a high maintenance saw at all unless you count sharpening the chain as high maintenance. So far I could not be happier with that little toy saw!
  22. rudysmallfry

    rudysmallfry Feeling the Heat

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    Other than the video on the Stihl website, is there somewhere I can learn the finer points of chain sharpening? I don't find myself with a lot of free time on my hands. Hopefully this is something I can do while I'm watching a few innings of baseball?
  23. nate379

    nate379 Guest

    I dunno if I'd bring a saw in the living room, but I guess whatever floats your boat.
    n6crv likes this.
  24. Nixon

    Nixon Minister of Fire

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    try www.aboristsite.com go down to the hot saws sub forum . You should also look at the Stickys in the Chainsaw forum
  25. charly

    charly Guest

    I carry a small paint brush and wipe both caps off before opening them up.. Works great.. 12 years Stihl Pro 360 still runnig all the original fuel lines , filters and carb parts.. Runs like new... Changed out one plug an air fliter and of course bars , rim sprockets and chains...

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