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How do you light your stove?

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by Ducky, Oct 30, 2012.

  1. Huntindog1

    Huntindog1 Minister of Fire

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    Joful likes this.

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  2. Dakotas Dad

    Dakotas Dad Minister of Fire

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    I have started fires in just about every possible way.

    I even sort of enjoy it sometimes. No lie I have a real, pioneer days, flint and steel and tinder box right here in the living room.

    But, I LOVE Super Cedars. No kindling, fussing etc. I am heating my house, not earning a merit badge. I put in a half a CS, full size splits, maybe a couple newspaper knots if there is one laying around. Light. Close door. 20-30 minutes start airing down.

    Simple as that.

    As far as buying "rutland" or whoever being "eaiser" than buying CS's... HOOEEY I say. I click on a website, make my order, 2-3 days later, they are on my porch. What's easier than that? I bought a hundred two years ago, still have 25 or so left, and that is after giving away several, and using some when camping.
    Huntindog1 likes this.
  3. firefighterjake

    firefighterjake Minister of Fire

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    I use a bit of kindling or wood scraps . . . mostly because I am impatient.
  4. argali66

    argali66 New Member

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    Yes, the Supercedar will start it by itself.
  5. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    Does that take into consideration that you get 4 starts from one Super Cedar? And yes, you definitely can start a fire with just the super cedar and a few splits. I still use some kindling most times but not always. It is sort of a habit plus we have so much of it.

    When you get the super cedars, I suggest breaking them into quarters before opening the package. This way you don't take a chance on getting crumbs on the hearth. After removing a quarter, I keep the rest in a zip lock bag. Hey, these will also work in a closet as they have that great cedar smell. And don't forget those outdoor fires in the summertime. Or lighting brush piles. Or lighting leaf piles. Put one on a fork, light it and then move from one to the other. Use your imagination! Want to have some fun? Light one and put it on the lake and watch it burn!
  6. Freischutz

    Freischutz Member

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    I use the top down technique - rolled newspaper over kindling over a few small splits.
  7. theonlyzarathu

    theonlyzarathu Member

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    IMO, you need to get the fire going as quickly as possible, with a lot of air.

    Take two quarter logs and put them ends toward the door at both sides of the fire box. Cut some small spits to line the space betwen the logs, no more than half inch thick. Put your fire starter on the lining pieces.

    Take some pieces of 6 x 1/2 x 1/2 and build a log cabin style 6-8 inches high. Light the starter. Put a split which is about 1 1/2 x 1 1/2 across the two quarter logs, and in front of the log cabin starter. Start it with the door open, then close the door with the draft on high for about 2 minutes, then open the door for about 30 seconds, do one more cycle or so. Always keep the door closed at the end of any of these door open-door closed cycles. The 6 inch splits with turn into coals very quickly, and the wood lining and wood sides of the "starter bowl" will start burning right away. You will go into secondary burn within 10 minutes of start up. When the 6 inch log cabin starts to turn into coals, put 1/8 splits which are 2 x 2's or 2 x 3's, ends facing the glass on top of the cross piece that you put on. When the cross piece burns down, then continue to put the pieces on with the ends facing the door as your stove manufacturer recommends.

    Any time you want to boost the air under the fire, put a cross piece in the front, but never more than a 1 1/2 by 1 1/2 piece.

    This will also work when you have less that really dry wood to get things started really fast, and really hot.
  8. HDRock

    HDRock Minister of Fire

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    No, I didn't that take into consideration.
    I am still learning a lot from you guys here. and I have a lot to learn.
    Got an email back today, that the Super Cedar samples are on the way.
  9. HDRock

    HDRock Minister of Fire

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    Yeah ! I love the brown Santa
  10. rkshed

    rkshed Feeling the Heat

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    Ditto.
    Dry Birch here too.
    And a little kindling...
  11. dorkweed

    dorkweed Guest



    I agree with BS here...........even with my Ash/Box Elder that's only been CSS for about 8-9 months now, all I need is 1/4 SuperCedar to get a fire started in a cold stove!! No kindling required at all.
  12. blades

    blades Minister of Fire

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    Once sometime in October.
  13. Ducky

    Ducky Member

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    To the guy that asked... My chimney is stove pipe... I should have clarified better :)

    I will hafta look into them super cedar doohickeys... Something I can add to my overly short Xmas list :)

    I do agree getting the temp of the stove pipe hot as quickly as possible is essential... The fire seems to burn better with a hot pipe vs a cold pipe....
  14. eujamfh

    eujamfh Member

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    I think it is apparent there are super cedar fans here...but I just have to weigh in since I too am a SC fan.

    1/4 will light any dry wood (pine, oak, poplar, cherry, hickory etc) and will get both my stoves running - one is a cat, one is a non-cat. No paper, no small splits, no kindling. Normal size pieces of wood, just placed in a way that allows good airflow over at least two good edges. Thats it.

    As for the cost...I gladly took the free samples,and then bought the biggest amount when they ran their sale. Its peanuts looking at the convienece compared to the money our family spends on other things in a month...take for example bottled water. Not Perrier here, but even Kirkland costs more then tap water...but it is convient with the kids and running around.

    If you think about it - you really don't need a car….think of all the money saved on gas if you walk. Heck, we could keep the house at 50 degrees if we really wanted to save every penny and layer on clothes...but that would translate to me living in the shed, and there is no heat there!. :)
    dorkweed likes this.
  15. HDRock

    HDRock Minister of Fire

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    Easy,fast,less screwing around :cool: that's what I'm talkin about !!
  16. NextEndeavor

    NextEndeavor Burning Hunk

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    Southern Iowa
    About four layers no paper: Splitter reminants, scrap pallet pieces, then small splits and finally the larger fuelwood warmed with a little propane torch about 20 seconds. (a one pound bottle will last a couple years). You get a nearly effortless quick hot fire.
  17. Ducky

    Ducky Member

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    Ya know.... I heat my shop, a seperate building, 2k sq ft open floor plan, with my vigilant..... My house is heated with gas boiler.... It's November, in Buffalo..... I have yet to turn the heat on in my house. In fact the other night the boiler kicked on because I forgot to remove one screw on the thermostat so that wouldn't happen (off level the thermostate = won't turn on). Meaning the house was down to 50f or so. Some of us don't have the luxury for such things as bottled water, and a huge house and 75f year round.... Just saying....

    Some of us, we're forced to switch completely over to wood heat because the gas bill for heat is too high... Something to consider... For me, $600 a year for firewood, to keep my work space, my shop, comfortable, is alot cheaper than $200 a month during the slow season - winter.. To keep the shop chilly at 50. Not to mention, condensation on tools does horrific damage.

    I have seriously contemplated putting in a wood stove in my house. However I do need atleast 2 more years with my stove before I make that move. I didn't grow up with wood heat and have learned everything I know first hand... Need less to say, the ceiling in my chop is now a nice shade of grey from my learning experience. I don't want my homes ceilings grey too, so need to do some painting and see how all works out before I make the plunge... The $2,000 plunge... As much as my local govt charges me to send a bunch of spoiled rotten rich kids to school for the year....but that's another rant...

    Just know, that some of us, arnt as gifted as you. I looked up the super cedars... I'll stick with my free saw dust, and super cheap wax... It's too expensive for a convenience. It is what it is....

    I apologize if that came off as prickish
  18. HDRock

    HDRock Minister of Fire

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    Well there is a lot if differant ways to get a fire going , and I like to here em all
  19. ControlFreak

    ControlFreak Feeling the Heat

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    People who heat with wood just like to play with fire! I love people who heat with wood -- they are not afraid of hard labor and they love being able to keep the house warmer than they would if they were heating with oil or whatever other heat source. As for me, I love being energy independent - I send very little money to the fanatics in the middle east.
    Huntindog1 likes this.
  20. Dakotas Dad

    Dakotas Dad Minister of Fire

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    WOW!

    TELL US HOW YOU REALLY FEEL.

    YOU asked how people start their fires.

    People responded, and honestly responded kindly after you pointed out your kerosene use, not only not recommended by ANY stove manufacturer, but VERY dangerous. By the end of the winter we will have links in posts to many home fires caused by accelerant use.

    but.. more importantly, what you learned is many people use SC's and like them.

    NOBODY told you it was the only way. NOBODY told you YOU had to use them. They just pointed out they used them, and many even told you why.

    You also learned lots of people DON'T use them, and why, and what they did do. None of them told you to DO IT THEIR WAY either.

    And many of them pointed out they make their own, just like you.

    I don't apologize for anything, no matter how that sounded.
    PapaDave, Ducky and NWfuel like this.
  21. akennyd

    akennyd Member

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    Thanks Dennis, sorry...didn't see your reply sooner...

    Aren't the knots in dry pine splits just like fatwood? They look and smell just like fatwood....just saying/asking. As you know from my past postings I've been burning pine from day one with my stove and haven't had a bit of trouble. But I thank the Good Lord that I now have some dry (2yrs +) oak and hickory to mix in for longer burns and colder weather.:)
  22. Leadfoot

    Leadfoot Member

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    I use pine knots, rich pine, fat wood or what ever you call in in your neck of the woods.
    I have a 55 gal drum full pine knots all split up. Just one or two and we're good.
  23. Fins59

    Fins59 Member

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    "I'm so green, I recycle dryer lint"
    I guess I'm not the only one who does this.

    i start 1 to 2 fires in my stove every day during the long heating season here in WI, so I'm looking for easy and fast. My latest method is to use the waxy, milk/orange juice, half gallon or quart containers, egg cartons (not foam) and other small cardboard containers that are the right size.

    I cut the milk cartons in half, length ways and egg cartons in half. Now I have a nice flat - open-face- container about an inch or two in height. Fill them up with yard debri and chips from spllitting and sawing and sawdust from my wood shop, doesn't take much, and of course, dryer lint. Put this container on top of 2 crumpled sheets of newspaper and some kindling on top, plus a split or two, light a match and walk away. So far this season I've had 100% starting success.

    This stuff is free and yard is clean and I get the benefit of recyling the package material myself. I have 3 garbage can type containers full of this stuff.
    And you can make these simple "packages" up ahead of time. Right now I have about 15 setting on the shelf at the ready.

    Wife says this is the best method I've come up with so far. (she gets up at 5:30 am to start fire) gotta keep her happy :)
  24. Seasoned Oak

    Seasoned Oak Minister of Fire

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    Junk mail started with a torch.
    David Tackett likes this.
  25. Eric Younger

    Eric Younger New Member

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    This hits the nail on the head for me. I have only had my stove for 3 days, so I am still learning all the tricks. The installers got a fire going in less than 10 minutes, and the blower was on. It has been taking me almost a half hour. Not a problem in the evenings, but in the morning, before I go to work, it can be a problem.

    I just need to wait until the fire gets going strong to add larger pieces of wood.

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