How long must Locust be seasoned?

JA600L Posted By JA600L, Dec 2, 2013 at 9:39 PM

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  1. JA600L

    JA600L
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    A guy I work with told me to burn it green... That doesn't sound right? Can you burn it green or must it be properly seasoned like everything else?
     
  2. Applesister

    Applesister
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    I think your coworker was goofing on you.
     
  3. albert1029

    albert1029
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    don't get much green locust, get the dead fallen ones that were nice after one year, better after two...some really old ones I've found as low as 17% in the center after a fresh cut...I've seen people here say that one year in optimal conditions would work even on the green stuff...but yeah, it should be seasoned...
     
  4. Missouri Frontier

    Missouri Frontier
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    I've heard some of the old timers around my area say the same thing. I think locust is one of the better(and hotter) burning green woods. But, just because it will burn green doesn't make it optimal or safe(especially in a cat stove). Season 1 to 2 years and the heat output will increase greatly. Light off will be faster and your chimney will stay sparkling clean.
    Dang, I sound like an ad for toilet bowl cleaner.
     
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  5. jatoxico

    jatoxico
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    2 years in my neck of the woods minimum. My neighbor told me the same thing as I watched his chimney spit filthy black smoke. And oh yeah his plain jane open fireplace heats his whole house no problem ;hm, lots of physical realities cease to exist on that side of fence :rolleyes:.
     
  6. Sinngetreu

    Sinngetreu
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    My new favorite statement! ;lol
     
  7. firefighterjake

    firefighterjake
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    Just about all wood will burn in your woodstove if you expose it to a hot enough flame for a long enough time . . . but will it burn efficiently and cleanly and not gunk up your chimney with creosote . . . well, that's a whole other story.

    1-2 years for black locust.
     
  8. Bigg_Redd

    Bigg_Redd
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    Till it's dry.

    Hope this helps.
     
  9. Jags

    Jags
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    One of my favorite sayings at work "just because you can - doesn't mean you should".
     
  10. PA. Woodsman

    PA. Woodsman
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    Black Locust is like someone said one of the drier "green" woods, Honeylocust is much wetter, but yes they should all be allowed to dry out. I heard the same thing about Black Locust as well as Ash that it's okay to burn green and that to my mind is just crazy.
     
  11. trguitar

    trguitar
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    It depends on the tree. I cut some black locust November a year ago, and tested it with the moisture meter right after splitting it. It was under 20%. This was a mostly dead tree that had come down after a storm. (There were some live branches that sprouted from the trunk last spring.) I didn't need the wood, so I have let it sit CSS for the last year. I haven't taken a reading this year, though, but I will be burning it this winter.

    Standing dead or dying black locust is often very dry and can be burned immediately.
     
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  12. red oak

    red oak
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    Pretty much anything that ends with the phrase "can be burned green" is bad advice. Locust included.

    Now my FIL took down a very large BL that had been dead standing for several years. Once split those pieces were ready to burn right away. But if the tree is cut live (green) let is season split and stacked for a full year at least.
     
  13. Jon1270

    Jon1270
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    The USDA says black locust averages 41% MC green, but also notes that MC in all woods is "extremely variable."
     
  14. etiger2007

    etiger2007
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    Two years once split to get the most out of it.
     
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  15. Brewmonster

    Brewmonster
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    I've cut some standing dead locust that was about 15% MC and burned great. For green wood, though, dry it like anything else.

    Everyone's heard from the wise old toads who say that you mustn't burn dry locust (or osage or ironwood) because it'll melt your stove! These sages often prefer greener wood because it burns longer. Sure, buddy, whatever you say.
     
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  16. oldspark

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    Ya you can do it, you can also piss into the wind if you want to.
     
  17. albert1029

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    i love this thread...
     
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  18. pen

    pen
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    Have about 95% locust to burn this winter. Been waiting 2.5 years in the stacks for this. Just for the heck of it, I let some aside in different stacks to burn after the 1/2 year mark, and the 1.5 year mark, waiting till now (2.5 years) was well worth the wait.

    Never had this much locust to burn at once before. One observation is that I've seen higher stove temps with what appears to be less flame action in the stove. Point is, what looked normal through the glass window was actually a stove hotter than I usually take it in several cases early on.

    It's great fuel, but seems to burn a bit differently on it's own than the other hardwoods in the area I'm used to (ash, maple, beech, cherry)

    pen
     
  19. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage
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    For sure and you can also burn white ash as soon as it is cut because there is no moisture in it. And you dare not burn pine else your house will burn down.

    Well, you can believe all the baloney or you can make wise decisions. Burning green wood, no matter what it is does not make any sense at all. Give wood time to dry and you'll get more heat from it, won't have problems getting the fire going or keeping it going, won't have dirty black glass and you'll solve about 99% of all wood heating problems. There is no good substitute for dry wood.
     
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  20. Missouri Frontier

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    Sage info Dennis.
     
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