how long to dry logs before they can be painted or stained?

efoyt Posted By efoyt, Nov 17, 2009 at 6:33 PM

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  1. efoyt

    efoyt
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    how long do you have to let a log ( not board ) dry before you can paint or stain it? Prob about 10 to 12 inch by 6 feet. Do you have to let it dry at all?
     
  2. gzecc

    gzecc
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    I would not paint it. I would only stain it. Use a pigmented stain. The log will stay wet for years. Expanding and contraction throughout the seasons.
    The species of wood will effect the drying greatly. What are your intentions with the log?
     
  3. smokinj

    smokinj
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    I would think it would have to dry out so it can soak up the stain under 20 percent as a guess.
     
  4. John the Painter

    John the Painter
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    I would let it dry very well before painting or staining.The dryer the wood the better the stain will penetrate.I would suggest stain over paint as it will fade instead of peel and chip. Good Luck.
     
  5. efoyt

    efoyt
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    i'm going to make a wine rack out of some. stand up strait, some sort of base, don't know what yet. Then drill wine bottle sized holes thorught the log. I would rather not have to let the logs sit in my garage for a year before i do it. I will prob do ash or maple. I also have some cherry i could use but i think that would be a pain to get the bark off of. I bet i wouldn't have to let the ash dry for long. can you stain wood right away?
     
  6. gzecc

    gzecc
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    I think the cherry would be the best. Looks the best, dries very fast. If you let it season the bark will fall off. Cherry however usually has some infestation that comes with it in my experience. I would let any of them dry for at least a year without the bark on (in doors) off the ground.
     
  7. gzecc

    gzecc
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    Have you tried looking for some old barn beams. They might be perfect for your application. Maine must have them around!
     
  8. efoyt

    efoyt
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    There were some at my dump two weeks ago before i had this idea but i think someone got them. I think that is the only time i have seen timber framed barn beam's laying around. i'm going to go back and check this weekend but I'm almost sure that they were not there the last weekend.

    but i could prob go another 20 years without seeing those laying around. can't believe i didnt' grab them
     
  9. ROBERT F

    ROBERT F
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    Cutting your "holes" or rack design in the log should help it dry much faster! Any type of paint will blister/peel as the moisture in the log weeps out. stain needs to be absorbed, hard to get stain to soak in when water is still trying to get out.
     
  10. devinsdad

    devinsdad
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    They recommend that a new deck 'weather' for that same reason before finishing. all that wet wood needs to dry out before staining or painting.If painting 'green wood' it might trap alot of moisture inside and not cure properly?
     
  11. efoyt

    efoyt
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    How about not painting or staining - if i take the bark off and bring them inside is their a downside to not staining? bugs ect ect?
     
  12. gzecc

    gzecc
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    Other than drift wood, I don't think the log will be very attractive un-treated.
     
  13. efoyt

    efoyt
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  14. gzecc

    gzecc
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    You mean Cedar? How about yew?
     
  15. efoyt

    efoyt
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    Yes, Cedar. Yew? Does that grow around here, i'm looking for free.
     
  16. gzecc

    gzecc
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    Free isn't always easy. In time you'll find something. If you want oak beams from 200yrs ago, I have some. They are hand hewned. They are $200 each.
     
  17. efoyt

    efoyt
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    all set with that, worst case i will cut some cherry ash or maple that is on my or my famailys land and let it age for a year. hopeing the old timber framed ( beams) are still at the dump.
     
  18. bbeals

    bbeals
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    If your building a rack for the aging or storing of wine, one year seems like a small amount of time for your rack to season. Our wind typically comes out of the case and then in the glass, storage is not necessary around here. :cheese:
     
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