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How much energy is your dryer wasting?

Post in 'The Green Room' started by Badfish740, Feb 28, 2011.

  1. semipro

    semipro Minister of Fire

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    It seems you could handle this though by inclining the exhaust and collecting the condensation that runs out one end. This is commonly done with modern gas central heaters where the condensate is collected near the air handler and drained or pumped elsewhere. Its also similar to what happens with horizontal bathroom exhaust vents where condensate drains outside during use.

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  2. Slow1

    Slow1 Minister of Fire

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    Of course with all the lint I imagine that condensate would be more like mud or sludge and clog a system pretty quickly. Not saying it can't be done; rather that it would have some unique challenges that probably don't really make the manufacturers eager to jump on the design bandwagon without some external motivation.
  3. woodgeek

    woodgeek Minister of Fire

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    I have a conventional dryer but if y'all worry about this heat loss google the offerings for 'condenser dryer'.
  4. nate379

    nate379 Guest

    Huh? I have an OAK on my stove. I can barely keep a flame going without it. Found that out when we had 70-80mph winds and the opening to the OAK got drifted over.

  5. semipro

    semipro Minister of Fire

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    Interesting. Thanks. I never knew those existed. Here's a description I found at this website. http://ths.gardenweb.com/faq/lists/laundry/2004120958010854.html

    "In a condenser dryer, there are two separate "loops". The inside "loop" of air is sealed from the outside environment - air from within the drum is heated, then blown through the tumbling clothes, then the moisture-laden air is passed through a heat exchanger, where the water recondenses. The same dry air is then reheated, where it is again blown through the drum and clothes, and the cycle begins again (this is a more-or-less continuous process).

    The outside "loop" in a condenser dryer consists of either air or water. Some condenser dryer models are air-cooled, and use the ambient room air as a heat sink, by blowing it across the outside of the heat exchanger. These dryers will tend to heat the indoor air in one's laundry room significantly. Note however that ONLY heat is released - all MOISTURE is contained within the unit. The condensed water can be either pumped away to a drain line (e.g. into a standpipe shared with the clothes washer) or stored in a container within the dryer to be emptied later (not all models offer both options). All standalone Euro condenser dryers are of this type, i.e. units from Miele, AEG, Bosch, Asko, Malber, and Eurotech."
  6. semipro

    semipro Minister of Fire

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    A condenser type clothes dryer makes a lot of sense for my application. I could put it in in the same room (effectively) with my Geospring Heat Pump water heater and use the heat from the drier to heat my domestic hot water.
  7. joecool85

    joecool85 Minister of Fire

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    In doing a little research it appears that condensing dryers use about 15% MORE electricity than a standard dryer. But since they don't vent any air outside, they obviously save you there. They also have an up front cost of about twice the price of a regular dryer. I don't think it would make sense for my application.
  8. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Wonder when someone is going to take the cold return flow from a heatpump and use that for refrigeration?
  9. semipro

    semipro Minister of Fire

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    I'd thought that myself. Seems like a water heater - fridge combo would work.

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