1. Welcome Hearth.com Guests and Visitors - Please enjoy our forums!
    Hearth.com GOLD Sponsors who help bring the site content to you:
    Hearthstone Soapstone and Cast-Iron stoves( Wood, Gas or Pellet Stoves and Inserts)
    Caluwe - Passion for Fire and Water ( Pellet and Wood Hydronic and Space Heating)

How to carry the logs

Post in 'The Gear' started by Beno, May 27, 2007.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Beno

    Beno New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2007
    Messages:
    175
    Hi there,

    I wonder how people with treed lots carry the logs from the forest to the wood shed? Our lot is about 5 acres, and I'll probably cut dead/sick trees for firewood, cut them in logs that I'll load in a trailer and bring the trailer home. I thought to buy a 20 HP lawn mower with a hitch to be able to pull the trailer and also to mow the lawn.
    Do you have any better ideas?

    Thanks,
    Beno

    Helpful Sponsor Ads!





  2. restorer

    restorer New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2006
    Messages:
    831
    Loc:
    Salt Lake City, Utah
    I have no vested interest in the conservation of these, but have you ever thought about buying a good old tractor? Some manuals and a little hands on skill and they become your best friend. Even help you plow the snow and haul the manure. Of course you can go the new 4X4,4X6 and spend your children's inheritance, but there are a lot of good workhorses out there.
  3. Beno

    Beno New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2007
    Messages:
    175
    Sure, I like tractors: old tractors, new tractors, ATV 4x4 etc. The problems with those are: they cost a lot for both purchase and maintanance. I believe in simple and economical solutions.
  4. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    28,754
    Loc:
    Northern Virginia
    I have five wooded acres, heat with wood and find that the dual use garden tractor has a major drawback. When the mower deck is mounted it is pretty much useless for hauling wood. Deck height and width make is virtually impossible to maneuver between trees, over roots and crap in the woods and easily access the wood.

    A better answer is purchasing a used garden tractor. When people wear out or tear up the mower deck they usually give away or sell the tractor itself for a song. Makes a great close quarters wood hauler.
  5. Beno

    Beno New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2007
    Messages:
    175
    Great advise, BB. Have you ever tried to pul a small trailer/wagon with a bike?
  6. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    28,754
    Loc:
    Northern Virginia
    No way. The way that 24 horse garden tractor strains with a trailer load of oak this 1/10 horsepower old guy ain't even interested in finding out what happens with a bike.
  7. WarmGuy

    WarmGuy Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2006
    Messages:
    492
    Loc:
    Far Northern Calif. Coast
    Speaking of bikes, I remember reading an article by a guy that modified a bike for carrying logs. Note that he didn't ride it, he put the logs on the bike and rolled it out of the forest. IIRC, he replaced the seat with a U shaped bracket. He'd cut the logs to something like 5 foot lengths, put them next to the bike, onto the bracket, then tip it up and roll it.

    Sounds like a lot of work, but if you want a man-powered system, it has some advantages.
  8. tuolumne

    tuolumne New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2007
    Messages:
    172
    Loc:
    Now living in VT, and building new home in VT
    Yes, I used a wheelbarrow, then a bike with a converted child trailer. It works better than a barrow as long as you have a granny gear. Then I used an old Deere 110 garden tractor and trailer...much faster. At our new property in VT I have been using this to clear the land...

    Attached Files:

    • 1b.jpg
      1b.jpg
      File size:
      192.7 KB
      Views:
      548
  9. carpniels

    carpniels Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2005
    Messages:
    536
    Loc:
    Rome, NY, USA
    HI,

    If your properly is that small. Why not do what I do? I cut, split and stack in the woods, and before winter move all the splits to the house. Or cut and split green and move it to the wood shed for drying. Then move to the house before winter. I use a $65 garden cart from Lowes. It is easy to pull and haul quite a bit of weight. I like it and the kids help push. Cheap, efficient and good exercise.

    I have been thinking about your predicament for some time and I came to the conclusion that an old lawn tractor without mowing bed would also be the best solution. BUt I cannot see myself spend the $500 for an old tractor with the few hours of work I have to begin with (5-7 full cords per year).

    Carpniels
  10. mayhem

    mayhem Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    May 8, 2007
    Messages:
    1,938
    Loc:
    Peru, MA
    Whats the maximum distance you have to move the logs and what kind of terrain is it? I'm thinking an ATV or maybe a cable winch on your truck would work if you're close enough.
  11. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2006
    Messages:
    15,088
    Loc:
    Northern IL
    A $50 old 1960/70 something garden tractor with a 2 wheel trailer. I actually purpose built my trailer to back into the wood shed (the trailer is 4ft in width and 6ft long). I can move about half of a pickup load at a time with ease. It can crawl around and over most reasonable terrain with little capital investment and even lower maint. costs. Any old Allis, deere, bolens type garden tractor will work. If you want to get fancy, find a garden tractor with a hydrostatic drive. Fully variable speed and I commonly (wheres Ralph Nader?) ride somewhat side saddle because it allows me to jump on and off the thing much easier. Yep, garden tractor and trailer (use tire chains if in slippery areas) is my game.

    And around here, if the mower deck ain't workin' they will probably give it away and for less than a 100 bucks I could probably find 15 within a week.
  12. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    28,754
    Loc:
    Northern Virginia
    A few years ago I replaced my 15 year old 18 horse MTD with a new one. On a whim I spent a couple of weeks at night in the garage rebuilding the old tractor. Body work and the whole nine yards including new seat and nice paint job. I rebuilt it strictly for wood hauling. When I was finished it looked and ran like brand new.

    Two weeks later we had a wind storm and a huge pine tree came down right on top of it, end to end, and demolished the sucker. >:-(
  13. JayY

    JayY New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2006
    Messages:
    40
    Loc:
    Western NY
    I am a big antique tractor fan but I am the first to admit they can be more trouble than they are worth. Many of the older garden tractors are built like tanks and the older cast iron kohlers, onans, etc seem to have a lot more lugging power than todays machines. The problem is many of these engines have 3, 4, 5000 or more hours on them. While that is a great testament to their durability, it also makes them a bit of a time bomb. I enjoy working on them and think they are worth fixing even when the repair bills get into the 100s of dollars but most sane people don't share my enthusiasm.

    I am considering the $200 4 wheel cub cadet wagon at HD. It has a 10 cu ft poly bed with holes to allow wood sides, 1000 lb rating, dump bed, tool pouch, cover, and the handle can be converted from hand pull to hitch so that it can be pulled to by one of those antique garden tractors. Seems like it would be useful for a lot of things but $200... hmmmm

    Jay
  14. carpniels

    carpniels Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2005
    Messages:
    536
    Loc:
    Rome, NY, USA
    Hi Jay,

    Just a few comments. I am worried about the 1000 # rating. That is pretty low for a 10 cu ft wagon. You will hit that in no time. I have the $69 hand wagon from Lowes. 2x4ft. It is rated for 1200 3s and I put maybe 300-400 #s in it otherwise I cannot pull it by hand. Anyway, the welds on the wheels broke so the rims broke of the axles. And this is with less than half of the allowable weight. Granted, I use it in the woods and the roads are sometimes bumpy, but so will you. And mine is steel. I am worried about the poly breaking down and losing strength in the UV radiation.

    Just a few point to ponder.

    Carpniels

    PS. If I went your route (and I would have bought an old garden tractor a few years ago if my wife hadn't stopped me), I would get the 2000 # or more rated wagon axle set from Northern tool. And then make a trailer from a frame with 2x4s with a 3/4 inch plywood floor and make my own sides. More work, but at least it will be what I want and be strong enough.
  15. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    28,754
    Loc:
    Northern Virginia
    I bought the Agri-Fab 17 cubic foot dump cart at Lowes 13 or 14 years ago. It has hauled five plus cords out of the woods and up the hill every year. And outlasted two garden tractors. Often the smaller rounds are chucked up in the air and land in it from ten feet away or more. Most loads have the tires squashed down half way. The only thing that has ever gone wrong with it was a part finally broke this year on the hitch because I have to load it tongue heavy for the tractor to get traction.

    I jumped on their website, ordered the part and three days later it was here for seven bucks plus shipping.

    For home wood hauling I can't imagine a better trailer. Well, maybe I would like to have the newer four wheel version. When I first got mine I lined the bottom and sides with plywood to keep from beating it up so much throwing red oak into it.
  16. wg_bent

    wg_bent Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2005
    Messages:
    2,248
    Loc:
    Poughkeepsie, NY
    Show off!! ;-) Probably going to put in a Tarm with 5000 gallon storage tank, a Masonry heater for times when the power goes out with a complimentary brick oven, and super insulation in the house too!! %-P
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page