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How to cut already cut wood?

Post in 'The Gear' started by rudysmallfry, Jan 24, 2013.

  1. rudysmallfry

    rudysmallfry Feeling the Heat

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    I've been searching youtube, but cannot seem to find the answer to what I thought was a simple question. I am new to chainsaws, hence the question. I recently scored a lot of rounds of various widths. The problem is, most of them are cut about 24", and my stove needs them closer to 20", so I need to recut all off them. There are also lots of smaller limbs still about 6' long. I understand that the chain should not come into contact with the ground, so I am wondering how exactly you cut longer limbs down to size that are already sitting in a big pile? Do I fashion a saw horse and lob off every 20" until I run out of limb? With the bigger stuff, do I cut part of the way through and then roll it over for the other half? Anyone got a link to a good video? I just watched the Stihl one and it didn't cover already cut rounds. I will be working alone. No way around that so please no 'have a friend...' answers.

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  2. Premier Fireplace MI

    Premier Fireplace MI New Member

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    If they are not too thick you can throw them in a chop box. Or make jig of some sort to support the log so it is elevated.
  3. TreePointer

    TreePointer Minister of Fire

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    Search the forum for H-FRAME and/or SAWBUCK
  4. swagler85

    swagler85 Minister of Fire

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    Good info
  5. BobUrban

    BobUrban Minister of Fire

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    Yes to the large rounds - I would cut 70-90% through and roll over to finish. I also would cut then in 1/2 instead of trying to take 6" off. This would provide you two decent pieces vs. 1 and and dink and will make stacking easier but this is up to you. For the little stuff I use the tip of the saw and carfully cut part way and if they do not break roll and cut the rest. If you have a lot of small stuff it would benefit you greatly to go the saw buck way I think. Also, it is best for the saw to run wide open so don't try to finess with 1/2 throttle because you are cutting something small and get it running Wide open before you touch the wood not after.

    I know this is the "obvious" but please have great respect for the saw. They are extremely unforgiving to flesh. Having and USING all the safety gear, every time is paramount for me. Especially when working alone. Good boots, chaps, ears and eyes(Helmet) I personally never pull the string without all my gear on.
    Tuneighty likes this.
  6. Beer Belly

    Beer Belly Minister of Fire

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    Made this out of scrap wood
    [​IMG]
    jeff_t and smokinj like this.
  7. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

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    And I am going to go against Bob. (no offense). I will cut one "regular" sized piece and then deal with the shorty. Lets say for argument your offending log is 25" long. You have the choice of two 12.5" pieces that will not give you the opportunity to properly load the stove - or you could have one 20" piece with a 5" drop off for shoulder season burning. Just two different approaches, but if I need to really load the stove, nothing ticks me off more than not having the proper sized splits.
    jeff_t likes this.
  8. jeff_t

    jeff_t Minister of Fire

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    Yep, I agree. I burn the cutoffs when I am home to tend the stove. They're still good firewood.

    I made this, like Beer Belly's. I made it a couple inches shorter than I wanted the splits to be, to allow for the felling dogs and keep the bar away from the frame.

    downloadfile-2.jpeg
  9. Beer Belly

    Beer Belly Minister of Fire

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    before I made the crib, I would put the wood on a pallet, and cut between the slots of the pallet.....just gotta watch you don't get cut while you hold down the wood with foot
  10. rudysmallfry

    rudysmallfry Feeling the Heat

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    Thanks for the info guys. So yes to rolling over the bigger stuff. I'm going back and forth about lobbing off a few inches versus cutting in half. I use a side loading door and often run into that problem where you push all the hot coals against the far wall and find yourself suddenly holding an already lit piece of wood that no longer fits into the stove. If I cut them in half, I can load them front to back instead of long ways.

    I will do more investigating on sawbuck. I do have pallets and was thinking of doing that. I was told it's a big no-no to hold wood with foot. Sounds like folks do it that way after all?

    I do have enormous respect for the chain saw. I went years without owning one out of sheer fear. I had to get a large truck a few years ago to pull my horse trailer, and the pickup bed started calling to me to put scrounged wood into it. Since I'm finding mostly rounds, it begged chain saw. As someone pointed out to me, injury is usually preceded by the operator saying "watch this", so I feel a bit more confident that I can handle the thing.
  11. MasterMech

    MasterMech Guest

    I have done it, it's bad juju, and I do not recommend it. Build yourself a sawbuck and do it the safer way. If you have big rounds (more than you can/want to lift onto a sawbuck) then you can always cut 75-90% of the way through and roll it over to finish. Those should not require you to hold them still with your foot.

    I see you have an MS180, if you want to work with 1 log/split at a time, use the "have a friend" method. My friend is blue and has Iron & Oak written all over him.

    [​IMG]
    velvetfoot likes this.

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