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Hud-Son portable saw mills

Post in 'The Gear' started by thewoodlands, Aug 17, 2010.

  1. thewoodlands

    thewoodlands Minister of Fire

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    Any owners of the 118 or the 121 and if so how do you like them, any info would be appreciated.

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  2. Battenkiller

    Battenkiller Minister of Fire

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    The price is right on the little one. I'd have one if I had my own forest like you do. :)
  3. thewoodlands

    thewoodlands Minister of Fire

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    Crazy part about it was my wiife started to talk about it, we will have a better idea after this week. I'm thinking the 121 and that won't do some of the trees we have.

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  4. thewoodlands

    thewoodlands Minister of Fire

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    Battenkiller this is one that I would mill, I'll have to go back tonight and measure the circumference so I can get the diameter.

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  5. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    Thats the big part on the band mills is the size of tree you can do and the other is how are you going to get the log on there.
  6. thewoodlands

    thewoodlands Minister of Fire

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    Logrite makes a nice ATV arch, we will have a better idea after this weekend.

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  7. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    I watch there video pretty slick if moving and size of tree's are not an issue. Do you have a big prodject in mind already?
  8. pteubel

    pteubel Feeling the Heat

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    Yea, I have one. Great little machine...for personal use. No way you are going to get PRODUCTION out of it. Needs a stable FLAT base to cut straight, though (think concrete slab or deck/platform). I used mine to cut most of the wood for a friend's 28x40 timber frame barn years ago. My friend bought enough extra track to cut 20ft beams.

    I just used it last week to resaw some extra beams into siding and mill up a few straight small logs (too good for firewood) for my new equipment shed (3rd and 4th pic below). Bands are $20 each new and resharpening costs about $7 each in lots of 10 (including shipping).

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  9. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    I have seen clycone wheels for the band sharpening couldnt be to tough. Dont know what kind of grinder you would need but keeping them sharp has to be a big key.
  10. pteubel

    pteubel Feeling the Heat

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    The wheel isn't the big cost. The machine is...starts at $1200. It's not like sharpening a chainsaw. The entire profile is dressed (backside, tip, gullet) plus each tooth needs to be "set" (that requires another machine or jig).

    I almost got one, but decided it was not economically feasible for the amount I would use it.
  11. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    wow, so a cyclone wheel at 250.00 is a drop in the bucket. I was wonder what machine you would have to have. To have 10 bands would be 200.00 and 70 bucks to resharpen..Any estimate on how many bf per band you could get? I know its just a guess.
  12. pteubel

    pteubel Feeling the Heat

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    I honestly can't remember how long they lasted in clean logs, but it was several big logs. I do remember hitting many nails and that stops you immediately. What really sucked was hitting a nail, hacking out the nail with a hatchet, changing the blade, and hitting another nail 2ft down the logs. After a couple of those situations, I got a cheap wand-type metal detector. Helped a great deal, but sometimes metal is buried deep...like those old square nails from days of old.

    I found that sawing was only a SMALL part of the lumber producing process. Felling, bucking, skidding, cleaning, handling the logs took the majority of the time. After the sawing, there was stacking, stickering, drying, restacking (sometimes), culling, edging, planing before it was usable. I sold my Lucasmill swing-blade last year because I found it was FAR more work the cut lumber than to just buy it from the numerous local mills around me. The Oscar 118 I kept because it's, well, a hobby mill and that's what I use it for now.
  13. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    Oh I know what all goes into it, I have an alaskan mill with a 880 just seeing what the maintance difference are seems about the same. I know the bands are faster but can only do small logs. There always a trade off just depends what your willing to trade for.lol
  14. pteubel

    pteubel Feeling the Heat

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    My friend started his barn with an AK mill. That's why we got the bandmill. I used it a couple times. Never again. It has it's use, but it's ALOT of work!! We trimmed the BIG logs down to 16" cants on my Lucasmill, then put them on the bandmill to get the wide boards (Lucasmill can only cut 6" boards, but handle up to 5ft diameter logs).
  15. thewoodlands

    thewoodlands Minister of Fire

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    Peter SWNH what model is that and how long have you had it? Nice setup.


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  16. pteubel

    pteubel Feeling the Heat

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    It's the Oscar 118. Bought it in 2005.
  17. thewoodlands

    thewoodlands Minister of Fire

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    Nice, for the base would crushed stone with 4x4's leveled up work for putting the track on?

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  18. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    You could just build a small deck level is the key and you want it to be permanent.
  19. pteubel

    pteubel Feeling the Heat

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    Yes, that would work. I originally set it up on the lawn (before my friend had the barn foundation poured) and it was flexing enough to affect the cut. Think railroad bed. Other than blades, the only repair/maintenance I've had to do was replace the drive belt and change the oil. The B&S engine runs like a Honda (so far).

    If you have the log handling capability, I would suggest you consider going bigger (Oscar 121+). Mine is rated for 18", but it'll ONLY do that size if the log is ruler-straight. Any crook or bend will reduce the max size significantly.
  20. thewoodlands

    thewoodlands Minister of Fire

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    If we do this I would like at sometime two setups, one around the house and in the woods.


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  21. SolarAndWood

    SolarAndWood Minister of Fire

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    Is it feasible to roll a log onto the track without beating it up? i.e. just need a piece of equipment to skid the log not necessarily to pick it up?
  22. thewoodlands

    thewoodlands Minister of Fire

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    Thanks for the info, the 121 is one we are looking at also. It will be interesting which other companies will be there.

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  23. pteubel

    pteubel Feeling the Heat

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    Absolutely. The track is very stout. I wouldn't drop a 16" oak log on it vertically from 10ft, but properly supported, it'll handle ANYTHING you can roll on it. Think of a truck frame and the flex it has when going offroad. It's supported at 4 points (tires). Drive up over a big rock, and it twists. You don't want that with sawmill track. With a solid base (think railroad bed), it'll hold anything. I'm just saying you can just plop it on your lawn and go to town sawing. You'll end up with 1/8" variations in the cut.
  24. pteubel

    pteubel Feeling the Heat

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    Then get the trailer option. With the jacks, it allows an easier STABLE setup anywhere. You can either remove the axle to put in on the ground or you can use the jacks extended and build ramps to roll the log onto the track.
  25. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    Sounds like if you had a cheep mini-mill to make can'ts out of the bigger logs to fit you would have a nice package.

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