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I abused my saw....HELP!

Post in 'The Gear' started by Beer Belly, Apr 30, 2013.

  1. Beer Belly

    Beer Belly Minister of Fire

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    I was using my Stihl ms290 (Farmboss in sig.) to cut a stump as close to ground level as I could....this is my first attempt...ever. Anyhow, the center of the stump (Ash) had a center that was rotted and filled with dirt (found out the hard way)....dulled the chain fast.....I then got peed off and buried the bar and chain into a big root that I was planning to finish digging out and cut. Needless to say, my bar and chain are an absolute dirty mess. Now that I've calmed down, and gave myself a royal arse kickin'....whats the best way to clean her up ???...power wash ???....the head is fine

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  2. nate379

    nate379 Guest

    A rag and some solvent or degreaser. A thin screwdriver or narrow putty knife will work to clean out the bar groove.
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  3. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    Use some toothpick to clean out the groove in the bar too.
    Beer Belly likes this.
  4. Pallet Pete

    Pallet Pete Guest

    Sometimes I use a toothbrush with degreaser but it really isn't needed. The next time it goes through a tree it will clean itself up just sharpen it hit it with degreaser and a rag as Nate said and your off for the races. In fact I usually just hit the saw and bar with an air wand to clean it up then sharpen the chains up and that's it.

    Pete
    Beer Belly likes this.
  5. lukem

    lukem Minister of Fire

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    No big deal. Tools get dirty. Leaving tools dirty is where people are stupid. Remove bar and chain...scrape out bar groove real good with small screwdriver or a nail pounded flat and wipe everything down real good. For the chain a quick scrub with a stiff bristle brush and HOT soapy water (hot water dries fast and won't cause rust) and a good squirt of WD40. Sharpen it up and you're good as new.
    Beer Belly likes this.
  6. Ram 1500 with an axe...

    Ram 1500 with an axe... Minister of Fire

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    Take it back to the store and get a new one?
  7. Trooper

    Trooper Guest

    What type/brand of degreaser do you all use?
  8. Sean McGillicuddy

    Sean McGillicuddy Burning Hunk

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    I use this to run in the bar groove!
    [​IMG]
    Beer Belly likes this.
  9. Pallet Pete

    Pallet Pete Guest

    Zep from home depot its cheap and cleans anything up in a hurry and its natural citrus based so no crazy chemicals all over you and your equipment.

    Pete
  10. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    By the sounds of it I might throw the power washer to it! ;) J/K any degreaser will work fine.
  11. thewoodlands

    thewoodlands Minister of Fire

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    Get yourself a bar groove cleaner at your local Stihl dealer, they should have one that has your raker depths on it too. After cleaning the dirt out of the groove in the bar I take the air compressor to the bar and the saw when I get home.

    I had a stump that was in the middle of a new trail, the 390 took care of that.

    Attached Files:

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  12. Bigg_Redd

    Bigg_Redd Minister of Fire

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    WD-40
    StihlHead and Nixon like this.
  13. HittinSteel

    HittinSteel Minister of Fire

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    Stihl makes an excellent tool for this.....it's marketed as a depth gauge tool, but since it's not "progressive" it's absolutely worthless for the intended application. However, it's tapered at one end and the perfect thickness for effectively cleaning a bar groove.
  14. bogydave

    bogydave Minister of Fire

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    Like said ; clean it up & it'll be fine.
    I save my old bar & an old chain just for stump jobs.
    Gonna make a mess of things & be dull & dirty.

    I have some old 2 cycle gas that I put in a pan & soak/wash the chain in. ;)
  15. Pallet Pete

    Pallet Pete Guest

    Just curious what do you mean by not progressive ? Mine works just fine actually better than the husky one I had. I do agree though it does work decent to clean the bar out in a pinch.

    Pete
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  16. HittinSteel

    HittinSteel Minister of Fire

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    Each time you file the cutters, it changes what the proper raker height should be (as the cutter length shortens). The stihl tool does not compensate for this as you simply set the tool on top of the cutter.

    A good example of a progressive raker gauge is the el cheapo carleton file-o-plate.

    Here's some "geeky" reading on the subject if you're interested

    http://www.arboristsite.com/chain-sharpening/114624-2.htm
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  17. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    Yes, Bob the miller on the other site got me doing that. I don't think its as big of a deal with cross cutting. Once you sharpen enough chains you get a good idea where you need to go.
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  18. HittinSteel

    HittinSteel Minister of Fire

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    Good point Jay..... I usually use the file-o-plate to set one and then adjust my grinder to that height and hit the rest. Sometimes I just eyeball the first one and go from there.
    smokinj likes this.
  19. Thistle

    Thistle Minister of Fire

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    I give the rakers 2-3 strokes with triangular file every 3-4 sharpenings.A little 'heavy' when cutting softer woods,a lighter touch when cutting or milling White Oak,Honey Locust etc.Apparantly had forgot last time where they were cause when making some heavy cuts in HL last weekend with the 2100,it all but shook the chit outta me! Sure went through that thick stuff fast though,just plant your feet & hang on tight! ::-)

    Something like this -
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  20. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    You get a hair cut or what? Oh, that is a strong saw!
    Thistle likes this.
  21. Thistle

    Thistle Minister of Fire

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    LOL that's not me.Whoever it is is quite a bit taller,more slender build too.I'm more like a fire hydrant - short & stout ;lol Sure is a strong beast...Almost rattle my fillings even.
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  22. HittinSteel

    HittinSteel Minister of Fire

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    The operator is none other than the famed Mastermind...... someone told me he builds a mean saw ;)
    Thistle likes this.
  23. I've sold saws to more than one person who has mentioned Mastermind. Famous out here too, I guess.
  24. StihlHead

    StihlHead Guest

    Man, if I chewed myself out every time I got a bar and chain dirty from cutting stumps I would be in a straight jacket in a rubber room by now. I save my old tired loops and stupid super-size safety raker RM2 chains for doing that kind of cutting with. Stumps, roots, burl wood (lots of dirt in those) and potentially naily wood are really hard on chains. Not the place for square filed full chisel.

    Power washing is overkill. B&C are self-cleaning. Make another cut in some clean wood and you are good to go. WD40 is good for loops if they are stiff or grimed up and I spray loops with WD40 before storing them in quart size baggies. Light oil is better than solvent or water on chain. For removing pitch and tree goo (especially from the saw handles) I use turpentine, which naturally found in many types of trees. When cutting Monterey or Bishop pine the terps fumes in them will just about knock you over. It will not remove paint or fade the saw plastic. I clean bar grooves with a stiff putty knife when I true them.
  25. Danno77

    Danno77 Minister of Fire

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    I think you should get a bucket of used motor oil and just stick the whole thing in there at about 80-90% throttle. Please YouTube. I don't think it should splash around, but I'm not sure and that's why I want you to try first ;)

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