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I found a Fisher and now I need more information on it.

Post in 'Fisher Stove Information, Parts, History and More' started by skipnay, Dec 10, 2012.

  1. skipnay

    skipnay New Member

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    I found this Fisher on Craigslist in Maryland near the PA line. I live in PA and it will see it's life back to warming the air and producing heat or maintaining heat in my garage. I'm hoping this will put off enough heat for a 24x40 garage with 14' ceilings. I know heat rises and it is built like a house and has lots of insulation. We also have a 8' high ceilings upstairs that is a 24x40 play room. I used a salamander, and just tired of the fumes. If the down stairs has heat for about 8 hours the upstairs starts to warm up. But usually keeps warm with a edenpure and a couple electric heaters even on the coldest days. Now for the good stuff.... I think it's a mama!!!

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  2. skipnay

    skipnay New Member

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    Any information given to make this more effeciant, produce more heat, use less wood and so on would also be appreciated!!!
  3. coaly

    coaly Fisher Moderator Staff Member

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    NE PA
    You'll need to set it up on bricks or 4" solid blocks, looks like someone cut the legs down. Probably to set on a hearth to keep it low for the horizontal connecting pipe to elbow up the chimney.

    If you search Hesston, you'll find posts on the history of the company that retooled to make 60,000 stoves to catch up backorders of stoves from fabricators across the nation. They made many boxes and sent them to the licensed fabricators for finishing.

    http://www.hearth.com/talk/threads/...d-fisher-more-heat-less-smoke-under-25.74710/

    Looks like you already have 2 extra bricks to set a baffle plate on. The back of the plate rests on the little shelf below the outlet.

    That's a good size for the area you describe. The Mama was advertised to heat approx. 1500 s.f. "up to 1750" in some literature, and 1250 - 1750 in others. These were very conservitive numbers, and many heat larger areas with them. The larger Papa Bear would drive you out of the lower level. You may need a hole in the floor above the stove with a grate over it to allow excess heat upstairs.
  4. pen

    pen There are some who call me...mod. Staff Member

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    Maybe it's the angle, but the legs look short to me. Was there a standard length they should be coaly?

    Wondering if this stove had them cut down to shove it in a fireplace or something.

    Considering this is going in a garage, it's wise to get the stove up off the floor anyway. Making a non-moveable / non-combustible base that brings the unit at least 18 inches of the floor is smart in the event that a gas can ever leaks, or there is a spill in the garage as that will help keep things from instantly going up with a bang.

    Also, depending on local codes and or your insurance company, you may find that putting it in a dwelling that has any gas stored in it could be a problem. Just a heads up.

    BTW, they are a great heater! My grandmother still uses hers.

    pen
  5. coaly

    coaly Fisher Moderator Staff Member

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    Leg length sticks down 6 inches below stove body.

    Side plate measures 18" high in front, with 24" angle iron corner. (Part #207- MB-PB)
    Side plate measures 24" high in rear, with 30" angle iron corner. (Part #206 - MB-PB)
    (Same sizes and same part numbers for the Papa Bear)

    This is what the original drawing calls for, but as customers had them made, some were custom built a little higher.
  6. pen

    pen There are some who call me...mod. Staff Member

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    Thanks, looks like about 3 inches of leg showing on skip's stove.
  7. skipnay

    skipnay New Member

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    Thank you very much the both of you. I'm actually going to build a small room on the one 24' end. I have a 6x6 atv door but don't use the door much and don't really have anymore room in the garage for the stove. So basicly I'm looking at building a 6x10 room if that will give me enough area to keep the stove away from the walls enough. I was figuring a fan behind it to help circulate the air. I have a door at the steps so I can open it to let the heat go upstairs. But like I said once you get a temperature downstairs and maintain that temperature the upstairs will keep that temperature after about 8 hours.

    Now the legs. I have thought and thought about this and have decided but it may get changed. I thought about making a rectangular rectangle out of 2'' angle bar. Then making legs for that. I can stick weld just about anything 1/16th inch thick steel. I also have a mig welder that I'm ok on I'm just not perfect on it. I do have a friend that works at a welding shop that can come over and do just about anything I need done.

    Coaly I will have to read your baffle plate thread again. I got really confused. I'm not good at reading something and figuring out someone else's idea but if I had some pictures of someone doing it as it went would help.

    Thanks so far guys!
    Skip
  8. pen

    pen There are some who call me...mod. Staff Member

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    Just an fyi, w/out heat shields on the walls, that stove's clearance to combustibles is 36 inches.

    If you have noncombustible heat shields (metal, durock), that are larger than the stove so that you maintain 36 inches to combustibles once installed around the shield, they can be put up with a one inch air space behind and below the shield, reducing your clearance to 12 inches.

    pen
  9. skipnay

    skipnay New Member

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    I have another question is right behind the door the bricks don't go up the whole way. I will have to try and take a picture of it. I was wondering if it was normal? You can see that in my fourth picture. Also I have brick that is cracked in half and have another one that is cracked almost the whole way through. Should I just replace all the bricks or only the two that are cracked?

    So basicly your saying I have to have 36'' from each wall to the stove right? How far from the back? OK so you now changed my room to a 10x10 with a 6x6 door to the 24x40 garage.
  10. ridemgis

    ridemgis Burning Hunk

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    Did they charge extra for the dead bird in the back of the stove!
  11. skipnay

    skipnay New Member

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    No but most people would hate me if they found out how much I paid for it. I didn't pay much more then $200 for it. I also got about $150 worth of pipe to go with it!!!
    ridemgis likes this.
  12. coaly

    coaly Fisher Moderator Staff Member

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    36" to the stove back as well. As Pen explained, a heat shield made of noncombustible material such as cement board with a 1 inch air space behind it reduces clearance 66%, or down to 12". There is other criteria for this shield such as raising off the floor at the bottom for air to rise in the 1 inch air space behind it. 18" clearance for single wall pipe to combustible. If not possible, double wall pipe has a reduced clearance of 6" to walls, 8" to ceiling.
    http://hearth.com/econtent/index.php/articles/wood_stove_clearances_installing_it_safely

    You only need to replace the bricks that are broken.

    The bricks on the sides all the way to the front, are "F" in the brick layout with dimensions given as 9 high X 2 7/8 wide. The sides are full bricks installed from the back first. This last 2 7/8" wide piece is just the end piece on the sides.
    http://www.hearth.com/talk/threads/mama-bear-firebricks.88386/ Post #2 shows the brick layout on the original drawing. Clicking on the pictures opens them larger.

    They can be cut easily, scored or cut all the way through with a masonry blade in a circular saw. They cut easier than a regular brick.

    Back go in first, then sides, then bottom.
  13. skipnay

    skipnay New Member

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    Ok so now the problem is I have enough pipe for the inside but what do I need to go from there through the wall and outside? Also where is the best place to buy this stuff. I didn't think it would cost me another $500 to $1k to do this.
  14. hilbiliarkiboi

    hilbiliarkiboi Member

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    I' m curious about your idea of installing in a small room!
    I'm guessing u mean partitioning a section of the existing area.
    How do u intend to move enough air through there to effectively operate the stove?
    I fail to see the reason.
    If you attach a non combustible sheild to your wall with 1" spacers (also noncombustible) clearance is 12"
    To make a sheild for the pipe cut a piece of 8" pipe lenghtwise and attach with spacers. Must have some verticle climb before exiting.
    I used a double wall adapter(duravent 8679 fits inside of 6"od outlet) because it fit and I couldn't find a single wall with damper that would easily fit.
    The T is single wall notched for the damper rod(this helped it fit the T).
    U need special thimble to penetrate wall or ceiling. Diagrams and suppliers can be found on this site.

    Please elaborate on "150$" pipe, stovepipe is only used to connect stove to chimbleny. 2012-12-13_12-01-45_207.jpg
  15. coaly

    coaly Fisher Moderator Staff Member

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    Do some research, the chimney is the engine that drives the stove, and is much more important than the stove.

    The chimney is the expensive part. (BUT IT"S STILL HALF THE COST OF A TANK OF OIL AND LASTS 25 YEARS !!) With the advent of prefabricated metal chimneys the cost and labor is considerably less than stone, brick or block.

    Without looking at your installation no one can tell you what's best for you. (Through the roof or through the wall type kit) Look into a "pack" chimney like Selkirk at Lowes, or Dura-Vent, an air insulated chimney system at Home Depot. This is the company (when it was Simpson) that partnered with Fisher and supplied installation kits and outdoor air intake kits with their stoves.

    You will find tons of chimney info on the forums other than this forum dedicated to Fisher Stoves only.
  16. skipnay

    skipnay New Member

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    I will check the search button and I will get a hold of some of the advertiser's here. Kinda like doing business with people that help on sites plus they seem to give out a lot of helpful information for free and not try to drop you like a 50 lb weight...

    P.S. Answer's are in red!!!
  17. mtn man

    mtn man Member

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    Lowes usually carries everything you need to install through the wall or the roof. Plus if you are a vet or know someone that is a vet then you save 10% too. Good luck on the install. Also you can go to selkirk.com and see the different types of set ups and clearances needed for the pipe also.
  18. hilbiliarkiboi

    hilbiliarkiboi Member

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    Timford thar podner. I see red. I hate u. Now tell me u found 4 little feet that go with it. LOL
    Pointed out suppliers because they show installation examples.
    Rered your post and got it (the picture.)

    When I installed new brick the latch rod was touching brick just before feeling tight enough. So I chopped it down witha edga myhand.

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