If you had your druthers . . . .

Vic99 Posted By Vic99, Oct 29, 2008 at 2:49 PM

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What is your favorite all around wood for burning?

  1. Oak

    36.6%
  2. Maple

    1.2%
  3. Pine/Cedar

    3.7%
  4. Birch

    12.2%
  5. Hickory

    4.9%
  6. Osage

    6.1%
  7. Beech

    1.2%
  8. Apple/Mulberry or other similar fruit tree

    15.9%
  9. Ash

    11.0%
  10. Locust

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  11. Aspen/Willow

    7.3%
  12. Other

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
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  1. Adios Pantalones

    Adios Pantalones
    Minister of Fire 2.
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    May 20, 2008
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    S.NH- Mass's smoking section
    I have a couple that I planted in my yard- one has survived 5+ years. Others that I planted in MA, I suspect still grow in my ex wife's yard.

    It grows in MD, PA, MO, KS, OH, IL- some of which get a bit nipply in the winter.
     
  2. Dill

    Dill
    Feeling the Heat 2.
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    Oct 14, 2008
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    Northwood NH
    Well if I'm going to transplant in trees to grow its going to a be a sugar bush and a christmas tree plot. Stuff to make money not stuff to burn. I meant that OO doesn't grow around here naturally. Just as we have access to trees that people in AK would give a nice body part for.
     
  3. Jags

    Jags
    Moderate Moderator 2.
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    Aug 2, 2006
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    Northern IL
    Osage Orange is one mutha of a firewood. Harvesting is a royal pain, but the return is wood that has burning characteristics like coal. If you have never burned it, get a pickup load and get is seasoned real good. Throw that on your overnight fire and see what happens. :cheese:

    It is true that O.O. has a low moisture content even when green, but by far will burn better after a year of seasoning. I got a "special" stack of O.O just for those bad,bad,bad weather times. Oh yeah, there are times that you will open the door of the stove and that log will light up like a sparkler. It'll freak you out the first time it happens. Pretty cool though.

    Downside - you need to have an established fire to really get the O.O to start burning (unless you light your stove with a road flare or a burning pile of magnesium :bug: ).
     
  4. derecskey

    derecskey
    New Member 2.
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    Jun 25, 2008
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    Loc:
    Geauga, OH
    I don't know that I'd deliberately plant an Osage Orange tree, or a Monkeyball tree as they're called here. Those suckers are a royal pain when they drop large nasty fruit into the road. Wouldn't want them in my yard.
     
  5. bayshorecs

    bayshorecs
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    Sep 28, 2008
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    Central Illinois
    The 4' Red Oak I am working on right now also took down an 2' Hedge tree. I drool every time I cut on the oak trying to get through the top of it so I can start on the hedge!
     
  6. smokinj

    smokinj
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    Aug 11, 2008
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    best way to cut it is carbide tip chain
     
  7. smokinj

    smokinj
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    Aug 11, 2008
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  8. bsruther

    bsruther
    Minister of Fire 2.
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    Oct 28, 2008
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    Northern Kentucky
    Osage is native to Texas and parts of Oklahoma I believe. It has an interesting history of uses and many different regional names.
    The seeds were highly sought after at one time (late 1800s I think). I think it's been planted in almost every state. I've read that Osage was the inspiration for barbed wire.

    Every time my buddy from down the road comes over, he tells me about some new, huge Osage he found on his land just to watch me drool. We're going to start cutting them down soon.
     
  9. Corey

    Corey
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    Nov 19, 2005
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    You could get a male tree - only the females bear fruit.
     
  10. myzamboni

    myzamboni
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    May 22, 2007
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    I have not druthers so my choice is other.

    I will take it if it burns. I scrounge and thus have to be open to any/all varieties.
     
  11. Nitzylplick

    Nitzylplick
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    Oct 25, 2008
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    Loc:
    Westchester NY
    Favorite wood should always include this type: "Free"

    :p
     
  12. gpcollen1

    gpcollen1
    Minister of Fire 2.
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    Oct 4, 2007
    2,027
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    Loc:
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    From cutting, to splitting, to seasoning, to availability, to burning in all three seasons I burn in - ASH would be the wood for me.
     
  13. Bigg_Redd

    Bigg_Redd
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    Oct 19, 2008
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    Wow. . .look at all the west coast trees on that list!
     
  14. North of 60

    North of 60
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    Jul 27, 2007
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    Ya I call it the Beverly Hills snob list. Pine does me just fine. Any one can heat a house down south with hardwood. STIR, STIR, :p
     
  15. crazy_dan

    crazy_dan
    New Member 2.
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    Dec 26, 2007
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    Missouri
    Anybody can heat a house up north with pine and a stove in every room :p

    I have no preference I burnt most of it and never had any problems with any of it.
    I have heated with pine and cottonwood in MT and with most of the hardwoods here in MO
     
  16. Jeff S

    Jeff S
    Feeling the Heat 2.
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    Aug 31, 2008
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    Loc:
    Kimball,Michigan
    This will be my first year burning wood to heat the house,since I got a late start I will and all ready started burning elm because it is easiest to find that has been dried out,was able to harvest 4 full cord from dead trees since August,seems to work fine.

    I also have been able to scrounge just about every wood on the list but most is green so will be next year before I will be a better judge of wood varieties.

    Jeff
     
  17. Todd

    Todd
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    Nov 19, 2005
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    I don't think I've ever seen or burned Osage Orange, but would like to try it out. There is a higher BTU wood than OO, Live Oak comes in at 37 mil BTU's per cord. Thing is, it only grows south of the Mason Dixon line. I like the Red Oaks for best all round firewood. Easy to split and burns long and hot.
     
  18. fossil

    fossil
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    Sep 30, 2007
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    We don't need a lot of stoves, we just need a lot of Pine. And we get along just fine. Rick
     
  19. derecskey

    derecskey
    New Member 2.
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    Jun 25, 2008
    168
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    Loc:
    Geauga, OH
    How about a little cheese with that whine.
     
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