Insulating Double-Wide Skirting

Post in 'DIY and General non-hearth advice' started by moshiersr, Oct 18, 2008.

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  1. moshiersr

    moshiersr
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    So I want to insulate the skirting around my doublewide manufactured home.. The floors already have 6" of fiberglass in them, but I want to stop the wind from getting under it in the winter (vented skirting, will remove some insulation in the summer to prevent moisture problems..) and to try cut down on drafts through the floor registers etc.

    I have sort of narrowed it down to two ways:

    A: Cut to fit 1" or 2" thick DOW Blue Board/Ridgid Foam and placed behind the skirting
    My thoughts - Higher R value, more seams, more hassle, might crack or come apart with ground heaving

    B: Reflective insulation (Reflectix or similar) stapled around the perimeter behind the skirting and then sort of laying on the ground.
    My thoughts - Easy install, lower R value, better wind break, no cracking/heaving problems since it's flexible

    I have about 200' of perimeter to do..

    What do you all think?
    Steve
     
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  2. savageactor7

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    I like the foam idea...I take it your going to do it from the inside of the skirting?
     
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  3. smokinj

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    tiger foam!
     
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  4. moshiersr

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    Well I ended up using reflectix because I wanted the best wind breaker.. What a difference just in one day.

    A night like last night the house would usually drop to ~63-64 degrees by morning before re-loading the stove. Got up this morning, it was still almost 69 and the floors were warmer. Took about 4 hours to do the intall to take the skirting down, install the insulation and re-install the skirt - we'll see how it does when it gets -10 this winter..
     
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  5. savageactor7

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    Sounds like a successful fix so far.
     
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  6. Marster

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    Hi How's this doing for you? I was going to do this to my double wide and the manufacturer advised against it. Said the home needs to breath. I can beleive in summer it would be an issue with the humidity but I still feel in the winter it wouldnt be a problem. Just wondering how you're making out.
     
  7. moshiersr

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    Well so far so good, but it has only been a week. I'm planning to open up a couple "flaps" in the summer to allow for some air flow, but in the winter I have to believe it will be fine. It usually stays pretty dry under there anyways because I have plastic down over 80-90% of the ground beneath the house.

    The reflectix is working great so far.. last night we had 30-40mph winds all night with temps hovering around 30.. 6 logs kept the house ~68-70* all night.. Prior to insulating I would have had a 58* degree house in the morning..
     
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  8. woodsman23

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    I did a friends doublewide and i removed all the skirting and put on 5/8" treated plywood with 2" foam attached to the plywood then reinstalled the skirting and placed 3 closable vents for circulation, zero issues to date 4 years ago.
     
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  9. Marster

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    WOW, that really made a difference. With that amount of savings I think I need to take a look at doing this as well. Thanks for posting. I think as long as the home breaths it will be ok. I think a good indication would be if you would have moisture on your windows and your doors wouldnt shut properly.
     
  10. Marster

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    Thanks! After 4 years and no problems it sounds even more encouraging to do.
     
  11. Garry P

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    I have a mobile home in KY that we use for a weekend get away, vacation place, etc. Down in that area they have companies that sell the cut outs from metal doors as insulation. It basically is the scraps from where they cut a hole in the door to put in a window. They cut the sides on a 45* angle so that they slip togther tightly. Works great but you have to make sure you put in vents to allow air flow, especially in the summer.
     
  12. billb3

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    Without that plastic on the ground you'd be trapping a lot of moisture.
    There should be some vents of some sort for when it's not cold.

    I'm surprised you don't have problems with pipes freezing without the skirts.

    Watch out for animals. I had a fox steal insulation for her den from an overhang in an unoccupied building in New hampshire. Replacing frozen pipes in February under a building outside is not fun.
     
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