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Is my Husband Going to Burn the House Down with this

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by hbrookerpr, Dec 3, 2005.

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  1. hbrookerpr

    hbrookerpr New Member

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    Loc:
    New York
    We are in the process of installing a wood stove in our finished basement where there was existing chimney. My hub insists on doing the work himself. He framed out a corner for the stove. There are wooden studs in the walls, but duarock on both sides (with no spacers other than the natural air between the studs) and on the front there is an additional 3 inches of blue stone that he mounted and cemented to the duarock. The problem is, he didn't read the clearances that were recommended for the stove before he did this work. One of his friends told him be needed 11" and now that he is done and is looking at the book...11" is not enough to combustible materials. He thinks that we can consider his back con-combustible, but I am concerned because the wood studs do not have the spacers on them. Can anyone advise? I am in a panic about this! I am afraid that heaven forbid something happens our insurance won't cover it because it was not properly cleared, not to mention the worry about death, destruction, etc.!

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  2. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    South Puget Sound, WA
    Hmm, I'm sure Elk will chime in here shortly. 3" of bluestone is pretty thick. What is the recommended clearance to non-combustible materials for this stove? What is the stove brand and model? Have you taken a look at the inside of the chimney before the stove pipe is installed? Is the chimney lined with a clay tile or stainless steel liner? As far as insurance, it may not be covered anyway if this is an unpermitted install. You'd have to check with your insurance company policy on that.
  3. elkimmeg

    elkimmeg Guest

    No matter how non combustiable be made his enclosure the lowest reduction ( with spacers) is 18" and without spacers and 4" masonry 26" from the 36" required
    If you need a copy of the NFPA Codes it is in a collumn form very hard to scan but I will try to do the best I can. I wish you had posted the question before he began, that way you could have started off right. I know he does not want to re do work already done.
  4. elkimmeg

    elkimmeg Guest

    is there any way he can replace the wood studs with metal studs? If he made it out of all non conbustiables then there is not a clearance issue
  5. hbrookerpr

    hbrookerpr New Member

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    Loc:
    New York
    It is a Jotul F3. We are using the rear vent and double wall pipe throughout. In the book that came with the stove there is a page that says clearances should:

    UNPROTECTED SURFACE/with rear heatsheild and double wall pipe:
    Rear-14"
    Side-18"
    Corner-17"

    PROTECTED SURFACE/with rear heatsheild and double wall pipe:
    Rear-6"
    Side-6"
    Corner-6"

    Does that mean that if we replace the wooden studs with metal ones (which is a possibility because we can go in from behind the wall from an unfinished room) that it can be placed 6" from the surface of the non-combustible wall we built or does it mean that the non-combustible wall becomes part of the equasion and we need only 6" from the combustible material itself that would be found somewhere behind the 3" of bluestone, 1" of duarock?

    I definitely wish we had have found this site way before he started! Of course, if he had have simply read the instructions first, he could have avoided the error to begin with! I have learned a lot by reading some of the posts, thank you ever so much for your opinions.
  6. elkimmeg

    elkimmeg Guest

    If it is totally non combustiable then you do not need a heat shield and use 6" as a vollune of air and space is still required to dissipate heat from the stove. It is also inportant for normal convection of air movement nMeaning if you remove the wood studs you can use the 6". To answer your current steup
    ROTECTED SURFACE/with rear heatsheild and double wall pipe:
    Rear-6”
    Side-6”
    Corner-6”.

    Let me try to explain ths different way if all materials are non combustiable there is no surface to protect or a need to protect. No heat shield is needed


    UNPROTECTED SURFACE/with rear heatsheild and double wall pipe:
    Rear-14”
    Side-18”
    Corner-17”

    eventhough he used blue stone non combustiable, he has it in direct contact with combustiables the 2/4"s. Had it been spaced like you mentioned it now would nave become a protested surface. Since one side is still open can you replace the wood with metal studs? Buy the time you and he argue metal studs would be in. It is really a shame you had not gone to Jotul's web site and downloaded the manual, before you started. BTW that blue stone is not cheap. When you have your hands on you hips giving it to him,Tell him you want 2 carbon monoxide sensors. One located in the room with the stove and the other on the hall of your sleeping area
  7. webbie

    webbie Seasoned Moderator Staff Member

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    Well, don't panic!

    It sounds like you are in the ball park, or at least close.....

    get this: NFPA allows a reduction in clearance of 1/3 to the original combustible wall (that is the wall studs), when one layer of brick is used WITHOUT an air space.

    I would guess that 1 layer of durarock and the blue stone is MORE than equal to that, meaning in theory you can reduce the clearances by 1/3. If these measurements are taken to the stud (combustibles), I'm pretty sure your hubby is in the ball park or better......
  8. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Thanks Craig. I don't like correcting Elk and respect his safety concerns. However, we have the 3CB installed in a corner setup with an air spaced, non-combustible surface 8" from the back corner of the stove. Even after burning hot for 12 hrs. I can keep my hand on the surface of the of n/c wall. It is very warm, but not hot. I think they'll be ok from a safety pov.

    Hbrookerpr, be sure the chimney is correctly sized and lined and make sure the hearth is per spec. Then enjoy the warmth and be sure to keep the chimney clean and serviced. And by all means have your hubby log in and feel free to ask any questions he might have. Post some pictures of his progress.
  9. elkimmeg

    elkimmeg Guest

    there is code that says the temp rise from ambience governs distance to combustiables. Something one cannot inspect in a few minutes with the stove not opperating.

    Just to touch on another post you picked up on
    early on I was into making home made rockets fueled by potasium clorate and sugar or was it potasium nitrate and zink
    We would fill a lead pipe stuff place it in a larger pipe solder a cone cap and fins on it stuff a spike wound with wire and attach it to a car battery We had lift off. My father research Chemist Cabot corp mostly carbon black research finally dir of research. Oldest brother PHD Mit physics and chemistry currently prof and ast dean U of Pits. Me suposed to be Chemical engineer Renslere another story History Northeastern. Younger brother PHD Math in the CIA, been to los alamos now the pentagon. Can not tell me what is job description is. Quite an acedemic background to grow up in. I had all the athletics abilities
  10. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Interesting background. I almost went to Rensselaer as well, had a scholarship and all, but wasn't ready for college at that point. However, I think you might have meant this response to Hotflame's query in the aluminum can chimney cleaning thread.
  11. elkimmeg

    elkimmeg Guest

    right I confused the post Any way Notheastern gave me a better hockey scholarship
  12. hbrookerpr

    hbrookerpr New Member

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    Loc:
    New York
    Thanks so much fo rhtis ongoing advice. Needless to say, this issue has made things really "hot" around here....and we don't even have the stove on yet! I am very, very worried about this! This is his first experience with a woodstove of any type, so it is a real learning experience.

    Can someone tell me how to post photos? I would love to show what we have thus far, it is certainly beautiful, if not to spec!
  13. webbie

    webbie Seasoned Moderator Staff Member

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    Photos must be saved as JPEGs, then uploaded using the "browse" button at the bottom of the screen when you reply.

    The photos must be 200K or smaller....
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