Is willow even worth the gas and time to go pick up for free?

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by Big Donnie Brasco, May 16, 2013.

  1. Big Donnie Brasco

    Big Donnie Brasco
    Expand Collapse
    Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    May 29, 2012
    Messages:
    315
    Likes Received:
    298
    Loc:
    East Central Kansas
    I know a guy that is trying to get rid of a large stack of willow but I'm not sure it's worth the effort.

    Thoughts?

    Thanks

    BDB
     
    Collapse Signature Expand Signature

    Helpful Sponsor Ads!





  2. lukem

    lukem
    Expand Collapse
    Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2010
    Messages:
    3,687
    Likes Received:
    1,518
    Loc:
    Indiana
    Pass. You'd be doing a favor for this guy you know, not for yourself. Go forth and cut hedge.
     
    Collapse Signature Expand Signature
  3. Jags

    Jags
    Expand Collapse
    Moderate Moderator
    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2006
    Messages:
    16,970
    Likes Received:
    5,766
    Loc:
    Northern IL
    Willow - If it fell in my yard I would burn it. I wouldn't walk across the road to bring any home.
     
    Collapse Signature Expand Signature
  4. Big Donnie Brasco

    Big Donnie Brasco
    Expand Collapse
    Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    May 29, 2012
    Messages:
    315
    Likes Received:
    298
    Loc:
    East Central Kansas
    I figured, thank you!

    I have one hedge "project" that I think I can start this weekend, BUT..... the job is removing some HUGE limbs that are about chest/head high. I have yet to determine a safe way to do it. Obviously I will NOT undertake the job unless I know 100% I can do it safely!
     
    Collapse Signature Expand Signature
  5. lukem

    lukem
    Expand Collapse
    Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2010
    Messages:
    3,687
    Likes Received:
    1,518
    Loc:
    Indiana
    Cutting above your head is about as dangerous as it gets with your feet still planted on terra firma. You got a cutting buddy who you can go out with to give some hands-on training?
     
    Collapse Signature Expand Signature
    Nixon likes this.
  6. Big Donnie Brasco

    Big Donnie Brasco
    Expand Collapse
    Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    May 29, 2012
    Messages:
    315
    Likes Received:
    298
    Loc:
    East Central Kansas
    Yup, I wouldn't do it alone and I would NEVER do it unless I had a SAFE way to do it!!!
    Just not worth it! Thanks!
     
    Collapse Signature Expand Signature
  7. smokinj

    smokinj
    Expand Collapse
    Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2008
    Messages:
    15,981
    Likes Received:
    1,410
    Loc:
    Anderson, Indiana
    I had that happen. It was a 53 inch truck. Still wasn't worth it but I broke my 460 in with it. Theres a camp ground close to me and most went there. I put a sign up free wood.
     
    Collapse Signature Expand Signature
    Jags likes this.
  8. lukem

    lukem
    Expand Collapse
    Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2010
    Messages:
    3,687
    Likes Received:
    1,518
    Loc:
    Indiana
    I think it would have to fall into my stove. Otherwise it is getting dumped.
     
    Collapse Signature Expand Signature
  9. paul bunion

    paul bunion
    Expand Collapse
    Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2013
    Messages:
    869
    Likes Received:
    559
    Loc:
    NJ
    You can use a bow saw to get around the safety issues with running a saw at head level. A big bow saw with a new blade cuts pretty well. It does not change the issue of how that branch is going to fall once it is free if, you are still going to need to plan for that.
     
    Collapse Signature Expand Signature
  10. RORY12553

    RORY12553
    Expand Collapse
    Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2011
    Messages:
    510
    Likes Received:
    30
    Loc:
    Southern NY
    The stuff smells real bad is annoying to split. I mixed it with other stuff and can't wait to get rid of it. Biggest mistake ever and like others said I wouldn't go very far and being I split by hand I wouldn't even take it if they dropped it in my yard!
     
    Collapse Signature Expand Signature
  11. ScotO

    ScotO
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    No, it's not. That's unless you like constantly reloading and the smell of burning pi$$.........'cause that is what it smells like when it's burning.
     
    Backwoods Savage likes this.
  12. StihlHead

    StihlHead
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    I had the opportunity to cut and burn a lot of willow when a large weeping one fell down at my ex's place and it had to be removed. I burned it in the OWB. Hard on chainsaw chains (lots of sparks), it rots fast, it has low heat, and it smells like cottonwood does here when burned (that lovely aroma of cat pee).

    Not worth it.
     
    Backwoods Savage likes this.
  13. Big Donnie Brasco

    Big Donnie Brasco
    Expand Collapse
    Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    May 29, 2012
    Messages:
    315
    Likes Received:
    298
    Loc:
    East Central Kansas

    Well that sucks... I have a little that I was gonna cut up and burn in a firepit but if it's hard on my chain....screw that!
     
    Collapse Signature Expand Signature
    Seanm likes this.
  14. StihlHead

    StihlHead
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    Yah, there has been a lot of talk about willow being hard on chains on some of the tree butcher forums. Low return on high investment. Also the smell makes it not great for firepit burning (unless you want to get rid of your inlaws or dislike your neighbors). Were I to do it again, I would have bucked and burned it as slash.
     
  15. bogydave

    bogydave
    Expand Collapse
    Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2009
    Messages:
    8,426
    Likes Received:
    3,446
    Loc:
    So Cent ALASKA
    +1
     
    Collapse Signature Expand Signature
  16. Locust Post

    Locust Post
    Expand Collapse
    Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2012
    Messages:
    1,063
    Likes Received:
    627
    Loc:
    Northeast Ohio
    Agreed....gopher wood.....put some in and gopher more.
     
    Collapse Signature Expand Signature
    zap likes this.
  17. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage
    Expand Collapse
    Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2007
    Messages:
    27,815
    Likes Received:
    7,367
    Loc:
    Michigan
    I cut one a few years ago. What is left of it is still there and if someone wants it, it is free. Just come get it. Such a deal!
     
    Collapse Signature Expand Signature
    ScotO likes this.
  18. Paulywalnut

    Paulywalnut
    Expand Collapse
    Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2012
    Messages:
    2,512
    Likes Received:
    1,071
    Loc:
    Kennett Square, PA
    The only thing I've ever seen worth using from a willow is making whips
    when we were kids.
     
    Collapse Signature Expand Signature
  19. StihlHead

    StihlHead
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    Well, willows are good trees in certain situations, like for water control and along stream banks to prevent erosion, etc. I planted a few here in places where the property gets boggy and they are growing fast and working well for drying them up. The bark is also a source of acetylsalicylic acid, a natural aspirin. But for burning as firewood?... :rolleyes:
     
  20. firefighterjake

    firefighterjake
    Expand Collapse
    Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2008
    Messages:
    16,942
    Likes Received:
    3,464
    Loc:
    Unity/Bangor, Maine
    I burn just about everything . . . and would even burn willow in the shoulder season . . . but I definitely would not go out of my way for it . . . pretty much the same feeling I have on poplar nd most softwoods. Will burn them if very close at hand and not much work.
     
    Collapse Signature Expand Signature
    BoilerMan likes this.
  21. StihlHead

    StihlHead
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    Poplar and willow are classified as hardwoods though. Whereas larch and Doug fir are classified as softwoods. Its a contradiction for sure, at least when it comes to heat value.
     
  22. USMC80

    USMC80
    Expand Collapse
    Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2013
    Messages:
    842
    Likes Received:
    389
    Loc:
    New Jersey
    If i have the room I would take the poplar, cottonwood and willow if free and easy
     
    Collapse Signature Expand Signature
  23. Woody Stover

    Woody Stover
    Expand Collapse
    Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2010
    Messages:
    7,227
    Likes Received:
    2,051
    Loc:
    Southern IN
    Look for a guy holding a sign that reads "Will Work for Willow." Win-win! ==c
     
    Collapse Signature Expand Signature
    BoilerMan likes this.
  24. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage
    Expand Collapse
    Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2007
    Messages:
    27,815
    Likes Received:
    7,367
    Loc:
    Michigan
    Yup. If the leaf drops in the fall, it is a hardwood.

    There is a good reason why you find lots of willow and cottonwood and popple along the creeks and around low spots.
     
    Collapse Signature Expand Signature
  25. StihlHead

    StihlHead
    Expand Collapse
    Guest

    Ah grasshopper.. not quite. There are several types of conifers/softwoods that drop their leaves in fall; the most common one here is the larch (aka: tamarack), another is dawn redwood, thought to be extinct but found in a small grove in China (I have one of them) and then there is the European larch. Then there are the ginko trees. They are a unique and very ancient species. The wood is soft like pine though, and it is typically classified as a softwood. I avoid ginko because it has the same irritating substance as poison oak/ivy in the bark and fruit (urushiols).
     

Share This Page

Entire Site copyright © 1995-2016 - email to webinfo@hearth.com
Hearth.com and HearthNet are property and trademarks of Hearth.com LLC Advertising Information