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It's Going Better

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by Bitterbee, Oct 14, 2006.

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  1. Bitterbee

    Bitterbee New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2006
    Messages:
    21
    Me and my old Fisher stove are doing ok. I takes a pretty high temp to warm up this house...keeping it at 500 ish but after a few hours of that everything is warm. Does burn down during the night but still have my hot coals to relight. This stove takes a bit of wood to get it to burn hot and continue but at least I have supplemental heat.

    My biggest obstacle in fire building now has been making my own kindling. Yeah, you can laugh. But I'm not too good with the hatchet...need more muscle.

    I restarted the fire this morning and in less than an hour up to 450 so when reach five I have to let it burn open yet a bit and then can close down. I use Daves method of closing down the left and leaving the right open a few turns. Just really have to keep my eye on the temps. And try not to go through too much wood. Once it burns that 500 degree range i can pop a log on now and then.

    I guess the newer stoves don't require so much attention...?

    Hope everyone is warm

    Karen

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  2. jabush

    jabush Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2006
    Messages:
    385
    Loc:
    Howard County, MD
    Glad you're getting a better feel for your stove, and that it's holding the fire overnight. I imagine you sleep better knowing the install is safe as well.
    I burned my stove HOT last year. Most times I was in the 500 plus (flu temp) range and I was feeding it a lot of wood. It was throwing way too much heat. I've since acquired a manual for the stove and learned a great deal on this site.
    This year I'm backing way off on the air once the fire is established. I did this last night and got good results. With the air vents just cracked, the stove settled in at about 350-375. Before I turned in, I loaded it up, got it rolling and shut my two lower air vents. I then opened the top vent about an eighth of an inch and went to bed. Got up eight hours later and was pleasantly suprised to have a nice bed of coals.
    I am still a little leary about creosote buildup with my new method, so I will keep an eye on the chimney and sweep as needed throughout the season.
    Oh...I hear SuperCedar fire starters damn near eliminate the need for kindling. Might want to hit up Thomas for a sample pack.

    joel
  3. webbie

    webbie Seasoned Moderator Staff Member

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    Loc:
    Western Mass.
  4. Bitterbee

    Bitterbee New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2006
    Messages:
    21
    Thanks for the kindling link...it's going to be cold again tonight.

    Right now house is at 75 which is warm, I seem to have to burn real hot at 500 plus to get house warmed up.. and only then after running it at that temp for a bit I can back it down (turn my right knob till 1 1/2 turns open. But it goes to 600 quick and yeah house nice and toasty and then I back it down as I just did. But that's too hot (as far as going through a lot of wood), I gotta play with this more.

    So if any of this makes sense, it takes a lot to get it heated and house warm a lot of wood and attention, then at one point it's a happy stove and kicks into good heat but then gets hot fast and wants to stay there. So then trying to back it down to keep house warm and not go through the wood but it loves those hot temps so that takes a bit. It is only at one turn now and down to to 500.
    But I have a cold damp house that gets barely any sun. So not like heating a normal new house.


    I am doing well having hot coals in the morning this way and stove still warm as well as the stone around it which is my goal.

    Is going down to 32 tonight here.

    BUT, I am going to have to work at this and see if I can make this function better. Funny my initial problem of this burning too hot was obviously temperature related as now is colder have a hard time getting it warm and sustained warmth. Without burning at real high temps.

    It does seem to need tending too all day, is this normal? Takes a lot of wood and a lot of adjusting all day consistently. Like you reallly can't go anywhere but to the store (a close one!) or your almost back to square 1.

    Thanks for letting me know where to get a sample of the Super Cedar starter log!

    Karen
  5. NWfuel

    NWfuel Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2005
    Messages:
    562
    Loc:
    Mukilteo,Washington
    Hell Karen

    Email your shipping address to forstarts@aol.com and we will be happy to send you some FREE samples. You will no longer need kindling.
    Thomas
  6. Dave_1

    Dave_1 New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2006
    Messages:
    302
    Karen,

    As you stated in your first post, & have alluded to in this one also, the house is poorly insulated, not exposed to the sun, & has rock that must be heated up before it becomes neutral as far as drawing heat from the room. So the house being cold & slow to warm has to be expected due to its particular circumstances.

     

    I never implied that you were to run at 600, only to keep the fire up temp between 500-600. And if it went above 600 you were to close both screws immediately until it got back to 500. I fire up at @ 500. I gave you a zone so that you would not freak out should you go past 500.

    The 500-600 range is merely general instruction for a novice in learning the basics of building a good fire that will not have to be relit. Just keep it close to 500 & @ 15 minutes later choke it down to @ 350. If you see that it wants to climb after it is down to 350 then that proves that your wood is drying out in the fire & thus the reason why the temp begins to climb. Please be certain that you understand that point.

    Correct! If you have followed my post to you & others about keeping a log you should now have some notes about the variations between the operation of your heater & mine, i.e. how many turns you have to adjust your screws in order to stay within the run burning zone, the fact your heater takes off from 350, etc, etc.

    Wood heating is not like setting a thermostat & forgetting about the process. You must pay attention & take notes until you have the routine down pat. Once you are experienced the procedure requires little thought, because you then know exactly what is required, to look for, & why.

    By your statement
    are you referring to what you previously stated above about the heat climbing from the 350 run zone? If not, please explain further.

    Unless the wood is included in your rent payment do not run at 500 degrees or you will go thru such like a kid goes thru candy. The Fisher wood heater is a miniature Bethlehem Steel foundry in that it was designed to be a blast furnace. Most heaters sold today are 6” flues, the Fisher has nearly double the burning volume with an 8” flue.

    Right you are. That is another reason why there will be variations between two identical heaters in different houses.

    Excellent. You're getting a handle on it.
     
    You already know answers & have explained the reason if you will think about it. For the situation you are in your doing great so just rethink your procedure. If you are having to buy the wood that you burn then run at 350, put on a sweater, hang bed sheets as curtains over the windows even if there are curtains/shades already on the windows, blankets over open rooms you don’t use, etc, etc. Not a problem when you think it thru. It is also good experience for you to learn how you want a house built later on. Right?

    No! Dry wood stabilizes the burn run process in that once the gas & water vapor are gone at fire up there are no accelerants to cause a spike in the temp once the heater is set to run at 350. About every half hour we open the right screw about a full turn in order to keep it at 350. You are having to do the opposite it is because your wood is wet, when compared to mine, consequently it is drying out in the heater. And once that water evaporates then the wood no longer has a handicap & starts getting serious about combustion. Are you getting the picture & thus understand why I burn dry wood?

    Correct! And learning to drive was not a couple turns around the block for most of us either. Keep taking notes, look at the bark of the wood to determine what you are burning, the ends if they are cracked, does it sizzle when put on hot coals, etc . Oak has more b.t.u.’s than pine, etc. You cannot expect to load pine & it to last as long as oak. Nor can you load oak & expect not to have to choke down the fire. You must think about what you are doing & draw correct conclusions about the heating process. Please feel free to pm me anytime, but not in the coming week as I will be out of state & may not have access to a computer. If you need immediate help please contact the people here, they will be more than happy to help you out.

    Take care,

    Dave
  7. Bitterbee

    Bitterbee New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2006
    Messages:
    21
    Dave, you wrote..and my response is below in black

    "I never implied that you were to run at 600, only to keep the fire up temp between 500-600. And if it went above 600 you were to close both screws immediately until it got back to 500. I fire up at @ 500. I gave you a zone so that you would not freak out should you go past 500.

    The 500-600 range is merely general instruction for a novice in learning the basics of building a good fire that will not have to be relit. Just keep it close to 500 & @ 15 minutes later choke it down to @ 350. If you see that it wants to climb after it is down to 350 then that proves that your wood is drying out in the fire & thus the reason why the temp begins to climb. Please be certain that you understand that point.
    "

    I will try what you wrote above and see how I do. I do understand that the differen't types of wood burn differently and yes I am certain my wood has more moisture than yours. Not bad but no not at your 6%. It's something I can work on for next year.

    I do wear sweaters and working on getting windows covered. I don't need the house at 75. That is what am trying to do, make the house comfortable which to me means not freezing without using so much wood. Just going to work at it.

    I'll try getting it hot and backing it down again after 15 min to 350. Just seemed to burn better at hot temps. But just have to figure this out some more.

    Thanks for more information

    Karen
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