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Jotul 1 for charbon? Or just for wood...

Post in 'Classic Wood Stove Forums (prior to approx. 1993)' started by Poradnik, Dec 23, 2012.

  1. Poradnik

    Poradnik New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2012
    Messages:
    2
    I just bought old type Jotul combi-fire no. 1. It was very cheap. Stove is in great condition. Take a look:

    [​IMG]

    It's hard to find information about it in Internet. I have some question to you:
    1. Can I use charbon to burn? Or only wood...
    2 It has ash pan? I think it doesn't. So which way can I throw away ash?
    3. Jotul 1 is enough for my 40 m2 house?
    4. Can someone tell history of this beautiful stove? How old can be this one which i bought? I hear, this model is 20 or 30 old. So someone recondition it, yup? How is it possible that so old model is still usefull?

    5. Any advice for using this model?

    Sorry for my preety weak english. I'm from east europe. Greetings.
    Billybonfire likes this.

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  2. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    51,038
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    Welcome. The Jotul Combifires were very good heaters. Your stove looks fantastic. I am wondering if it was in storage and unused for many years? The stove is designed to burn wood. That is the best fuel to burn in this stove. It might be ok to burn charbon de bois, but I would not burn coal or charbon de terre in it.
  3. Poradnik

    Poradnik New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2012
    Messages:
    2
    Begreen, thank you for your response. I don't know where my stove stayed.

    Give me more information about Jotul 1, please. I asked in Jotul company about it, and they told me that my stove is too old, and they don't have any information.
  4. scottgen20

    scottgen20 Member

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2006
    Messages:
    52
    Loc:
    Lower Saucon, PA
    Hi! What a great looking stove! I have an old Jotul brochure from 1978. It shows that your stove can handle logs of up to 12" in length.

    It is a general brochure so it covers a lot of their stoves from the time.. Here are some of the operating instructions that they have listed:

    --Place a layer of sand or ashes on the bottom of the stove. This is necessary to prevent heat loss and protect the bottom plate.

    --Make a small fire with kindling near the door in the front of the stove. After lighting, close the door and open the front damper completely. For combi-fires also open the back vent fully--perpendicular to the stove.

    --After the fire has caught and the chimney is warmed, regulate the rate of burning and heat by adjusting the front damper. On combi-fires close the back vent to the half-open position. The stove can produce great heat with the damper fully open, or it can hold a fire all night with a small opening.

    --When loading more wood, open the front draft control wide (on combi-fires open the back vent as well) to prevent smoke from entering the room.

    Hope that helps...

    Thanks!
    Scott
    begreen likes this.
  5. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    51,038
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    Good info, thanks Scott!
  6. jruttle3

    jruttle3 Member

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2010
    Messages:
    31
    Loc:
    eastern PA
    I installed one of these 3 yrs ago and am very happy with it.

    It can be difficult to find firewood that is short enough to work well in the stove, but it truly is best to work with material that is 12 inches ( 30 cm) or shorter. You can fit longer pieces in by laying them across the width of the stove floor ( that is, side to side), but then the fire does not draw very well. Much better to use wood short enough to lay from front-to-back. You can also use longer pieces by setting them in vertically, leaning them against the back. This can work well but I advise against putting in pieces too tall or you risk overheating the baffle at the top of the stove amd crackiing it or causing premature degradation. I like to keep the top of vertically laid pieces a good 4-6 inches ( 9-15 cm) below the baffle in the ceiling of the stove.

    The Bakelite plastic handle does not take any overheating well and will crack — I've wrapped mine in several layers of scrunched up aluminum foil, and that has worked fine, tho it looks a little strange. The UL models of these stoves replaced the plastic with a hardwood handle, but those are no longer available.

    Do you know that the stove can be configured to have the stove-pipe come out of the top, not just out the back? The top plate is used to cover the back if you do so,

    Also, go to woodmansparts plus.com to see a diagram of your stove and check to make sure you have all the parts it should have — the firebricks, the baffle plates and so on.

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