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Jotul 118 Burn Plates

Post in 'Classic Wood Stove Forums (prior to approx. 1993)' started by brianbeech, Mar 28, 2011.

  1. brianbeech

    brianbeech Feeling the Heat

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    Was thinking about how much I like my stove and had some questions.

    When I look in my stove, I see that I have 3 notches for a side burn plate to hang. The ones currently in my stove only take up two spaces. I hear that one is considered NON-UL (2 hole plates) and the other UL (3 hole plates). Being a newbie still, I wonder, what is the purpose of these plates? To protect the stove?

    Should I buy 3-hole burn plates? I want this stove to last a really long time and I want to take care of it as well as possible, so do these plates help that? Also, if I purchase 3-hole burn plates, does that do something to change how the heat is pushed out of the stove? Will more of it come out of the top of the stove, will more go out the chimney...etc?

    Thanks for any insight! Attached a pic of the burn plates on the sides with the top plate out. This was before I hooked it up this year.

    Attached Files:

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  2. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Not sure, but I would guess that with the UL plate you would get a bit hotter fire and a bit less radiant heat up front off the sides?

    One thing the early Jotul's did not protect was the rear. I made a burn plate for the back of my 602 because the backs tend to burn out. This happened to us when a friend was house sitting and did not pay close attention to the stove temp. With a rear burn plate, this is no longer an issue, but we do get less radiant heat from the back now.

    Did you temporarily pull out the baffle and flameout plate for this picture?
  3. brianbeech

    brianbeech Feeling the Heat

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    Now you're scaring me. I did pull out the plate that sits on top over the side plates, but you just listed two things. I 'believe' I only had the top plate out at this point - of course, I hadn't yet hooked it up when this photo was taken.

    I'm assuming that if I watch my stove temp and am careful to not get it above about 700F that I should be ok with the rear of the stove? Or are you suggesting that I try to find some type of plate to fit that area? I've attached a picture of the inside of the stove with the plates on it.

    Attached Files:

  4. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Don't worry, it's probably just fine. That looks like the baffle plate. I'm not sure about the flameout plate, Woodman's has it listed for this stove. I'm trying to identify this part.

    Attached Files:

  5. Battenkiller

    Battenkiller Minister of Fire

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    Brian, the side baffle plates serve both to increase the internal temps (dead air space behind them is an insulator) and to protect the sides from the intense heat of the fire. I had the short plates in mine, but placed them in the forward position. They always cracked and warped in the middle at the bottom, so that means to me that the hottest part of the stove was the front third, not the back. The 118 is something like 27" deep, so that's a long way to the back for the air to reach with any velocity. That stove burns from front to back. By the time the back of the fuel charge is burning, there is not enough wood left to cause damage, nor is the air coming in with enough velocity to sustain a powerful burn. Maybe on the shorter 602 the back was a problem area, but in your photo, you can see by where the creosote is built up that the back is much cooler than the front.

    One thing that I am curious about is the way your side baffles are mounted. I had a clone, not the real deal. My side plates were hung from hooks that passed through holes in the cast flanges at the top of the sides. This lowered them a good 2" lower than the ones in your photo. In almost 20 years of burning that design, I can say with authority that the front bottom of the stove is by far the hottest spot on the interior. The way yours are hung, I see no protection for the lower sides at all. Probably wise to bank ashes up along the sides at the bottom. I did that with mine for a year or two with side plates badly eroded at the bottom and no damage occurred to the sides.
  6. ericvb69

    ericvb69 New Member

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    Hi BeGreen, I own a 118 Jotul stov like the one on the pic and I've been looking for weeks for a service manual. Where did you get this diagram from? Do you have any link that I can download it from?

    Thanks
  7. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    I'm not sure there is a service manual. Might be worth contacting Woodmans to ask.
  8. ericvb69

    ericvb69 New Member

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    OK, but where does the parts diagram com from?
  9. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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  10. brianbeech

    brianbeech Feeling the Heat

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    Wow! I've never really looked at that or noticed that, but you are correct. They seem very high and I know you're right about that being the hottest portion of the stove. I'll be looking into the plates that Woodman's sells to see what their dimensions are.

    I have since moved my plates to the front of the stove and feel much better about that configuration.

    Thanks for the input!
  11. ericvb69

    ericvb69 New Member

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    So after reading your post, I decided to swap the side baffles in my 118. The stove is from 1983 (as the dates forged in the parts seem to indicate), it has 3 hooks on both sides but the plates only have 2 holes, so I can hang them at the front or at the back. Until now, they were hang at the back and I moved them to the front hooks.
    The stove is heating fine BUT there's something strange happening and I really can't find any logical explanation: The left baffle falls from its hooks. Today was the second time. When it happened last week, I thought I hadn't properly hang the plate so I double checked but today it fell again.
    We had a fire yesterday, and the day before and the baffle stayed in place but today for some weird reason it fell again, in the middle of a fire. Also the right baffle seems to be ok, the only one falling is the left one.
    Has this happened to someone else before? Does anyone see any rationale? I am really puzzled...
  12. Battenkiller

    Battenkiller Minister of Fire

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    Eric, my hooks were shot when I got the stove, so I put new ones in from the hardware store. I attached them to the plates with small quick-links and used eye bolts to run through the holes in the stove. Can't come off that way, right? Well, sure enough, every two years those eye bolts would straighten out from the heat and I'd have to replace them. Same with the baffle plates, although I never used the proper cast plates, just 1/4" plate from the steel yard with holes drilled in the correct spot. Eventually I blew a hole right through the smoke shelf, and I ran it for a season with steel plate on the top to block the hole. By the next year that was warped badly and needed replacing again, and I thought "WTF... you deserve a better (bigger) stove."

    It's a very intense little burner and burning it hot takes its toll on the small parts, but I always thought it was worth the effort. If I had that stove upstairs I would never have had to get a bigger stove, but from the basement install the Vigilant just puts out way more heat. 4-6 degrees warmer around the clock in the upstairs living area. I was getting old, and the cold bothered me more than it used to. I gave the stove away to some guy for his workshop (he's there all the time to watch it), and last I heard the guy's still heating his shop with it.

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