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jotul 602- some questions

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by stovepipe?, Jul 26, 2006.

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  1. stovepipe?

    stovepipe? New Member

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    I am about to put a 602 in a single room outbuilding. It is 180 square feet, well insulated and quite tight. a few questions:

    1) chimney height will probably be about 13 ft from stove top to chimey top, six of which will be class-A. will this be enough for good draft?

    2) I am concerned that the building may be too tight for adequate airflow. thoughts on this? If so, any suggestions for make-up air? the 602 doesn't seem to have an outside air kit option that I could find.

    3) I am thinking of rear venting it. If I do this I will use double-wall pipe. do people out there have such a set-up? Does it still draft well? or does rear venting compromise draft?

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  2. precaud

    precaud Minister of Fire

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    Great little stove. It will heat that size space with ease.... maybe too much!
    Yes, it will be fine, the 602 not at all demanding in this respect.
    Even small leaks around a door/window will be sufficient in most situations. I'd try it first and see if you have a problem, and experiment by cracking a window a little to see if it helps.
    No, it doesn't compromise draft. The main difference is that the top of the stove will run a little cooler, as top venting pulls the exhaust stream closer to the top and a little more heat is extracted. But in your setup, I wouldn't worry about it. It's a very small room for that stove.
  3. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    I agree with precaud and share his concerns. We heated a 2000 sq. ft. house with the older version of that little stove. Worked well at temps above about 35, though we'd be stoking it every hour when it was cold outside. It can put out a surprising amount of heat. I suspect you'll have a window open on many days. Our stove was rear vented, to a 90, then straight up for 7 feet interior single-wall and about 7' exterior class a. It drafted so well we had to have a draft damper in the vertical run after the stove and always ran with it dampered down once the fire was hot.
  4. elkimmeg

    elkimmeg Guest

    I assume there is a door to that room? That leads to more open space? What about swapping that door with a louver door?
    That way you will allow the other free flowing air to combine with that room air, for combustion air make up.. Another way is installing threw the wall vents, actually holes in the drywall, with grills covering them.

    Expand that thought further. Say you put a duct blower in a high low wall threw the wall venting situation. If you remove and blow air at the stove from the lower position,, the higher damper would draw heat into the adjoining space which replaces the cooler air you just removed.
  5. KP Matt

    KP Matt New Member

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    Definitely consider going with the double wall pipe: given the tiny size of the building you don't need the extra heat that single wall would radiate, and it will draft better.
  6. stovepipe?

    stovepipe? New Member

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    thanks for all the input.

    ELk, it is a one room building with a door to the outside world, so louver door would allow in just a bit more of the NE winter than I'd like. :) Though if the stove heats like people say, maybe it would work.

    any air that comes in will have to come from the great out of doors. THe temp in the room I can regulate-- with a window if necessary, though pleanty will be lost every time I go in and out on cold days, so I think the stove is an ok size (plus, it's about as small as they come). I am more concerned with make-up air as I'd rather not have to always leave a window cracked. I'd rather put in some kind of vent that will allow airflow in if there is negative pressure relative to the outside. is there such a thing that self regulates like this? But maybe the airspace in the room will suffice? It will be maybe 1800 cubic ft of air. is there some formula to figure the air volume requirements for the stove? It is safe to assume a somewhat leaky door but an otherwise pretty tight building. If I am very likely to need some kind of vent system it would be much easier to put in now rather than later. but if I'm likely to be ok without it, then I would hold off.
  7. KP Matt

    KP Matt New Member

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