1. Welcome Hearth.com Guests and Visitors - Please enjoy our forums!
    Hearth.com GOLD Sponsors who help bring the site content to you:
    Hearthstone Soapstone and Cast-Iron stoves( Wood, Gas or Pellet Stoves and Inserts)

Jotul F3 CB: Secondary burn, fire starting method, and best burn temp.

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by drew, Dec 6, 2005.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. drew

    drew New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2005
    Messages:
    4
    I'm still learning how to best fire up this little beauty and have a question for other non-cat stove owners. I noticed early on when I started using the stove the secondary burn ignited,and I could clearly see fire coming out of the little eyelits in the top. Should I always see that, like the picture I saw in the picture section here? Or, once the stove heats to a certain temp., does the secondary burn occur in the main firebox? What temp. have other owners found to be the most efficient / heat output for this model? I am trying to keep the temp. between 400-600 as the manual indicates. The thermometer is located directly on the top of the stove.

    I also saw a reference to a method of building a fire that supposedly cuts down on creosote buildup. What is the procedure that most of you use. I have a suspicion that I try to burn logs that are too large too quickly. I should burn a good many smaller ones to build up a bed of coals before putting in the bigger sticks? Thanks for the input.

    The stove itself is doing quite well for heating, low was 23 last night with temps falling all day yesterday. It heated my 1600 sq. ft. house with no problem. It was out at 5:30 am (filled at 10:30), but still a few little coals left to start back. I still need to get my install up in the pic section.

    shalom
    drew

    Helpful Sponsor Ads!





  2. Mike Wilson

    Mike Wilson New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2005
    Messages:
    1,003
    Loc:
    Orient Point, NY
  3. Nokoni

    Nokoni New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2005
    Messages:
    145
    I am using the same stove, only for a few weeks though. I don't see fire coming out of the little eyelets but I think air is coming out the eyelets. I am trying to run mine at about 500. Still learning how to most efficiently run it. Goes through wood like mad when I leave the air inlet open all the way so I'm experimenting with how long it burns when I set it at different levels. It has been fairly easy to get a fire going. The more kindling I use the better and if I build a good bed of that I get logs going quickly. I just start with a few logs and add more/larger logs once I get a good bed of coals. Once I get good coals it is a breeze. Love watching it. I got the screen that fits it but I haven't used it yet. No reason, just happy with the regular door so far. Hope you are enjoying your stove. Any new insight on it?
  4. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    49,832
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    Our stove also has a draft damper on the stack. I've been experimenting with various techniques to see what gives the best burn. Here is my best method so far:

    Get a good bed of kindling started with newspaper. (Trick, open the ash pan door slightly for a minute for a raring start.) After the kindling is burning well, place dry, thin splits and then a couple 2-3" wide pieces on top of that. (Be sure that ashpan door is latched tight and start air intake is closed!) Burn for about 5-10 minutes, then close the stack down to 1/4 open. Then, when the coal bed is well established, open damper, load her up, keeping all wood in back of the front log holder. Let the wood char for about 5-10 minutes, stack damper down to 1/4 open. Then when logs are fully burning, damper stack down all the way and drop the primary air intake to about 1/2. (This depends on the wood.) What I shoot for are lazy billowing flames. You will see occasional jets of flame coming from the secondary ports. Flames become blue-tinged and stove temp is about 550 deg for the next hour or two. Overnight is the same procedure, but once the logs are charred, I close the primary to all the way closed. Flames become random, wispy, bluish. Stove runs at about 400 degrees.
  5. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    49,832
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    deleted - pilot error
  6. pmac

    pmac Member

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2005
    Messages:
    98
    Loc:
    Eastern PA

    How does one know if you should use a stack damper? I've been using a Jotul F400 for about 5 years now... the installer didn't say anything about a stack damper. What are the benefits to using one - instead of just relying on the air adjustment on the stove itself?





    I tend to run my stove with the air wide open all the time, except at night, when I turn it down pretty much all the way. Is it important to keep on eye on the actual temperature? I don't have a thermometer and never bothered, but I'm curious now if I should be checking...
  7. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    49,832
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    I don't think a stack damper is mandatory, but for my old 602, which is what was originally on this stack, it was. The stove just ran away too easilly if I didn't watch it. This is partly because of good draft (straight up chimney) and wood. We burn fir frequently which has a high oil content. I've tried the 3CB with the stack damper wide open, using just the stove damper to regulate and it works. However, I find I have more control and get a longer burn by using both dampers. Your needs will vary with your stack and wood.

    To the second question, yes - get a good stove thermometer. They are inexpensive and informative. It will tell you a lot about the wood you are burning and may lengthen the life of the stove. In the past, know the temp has alerted me to higher stove temps that I might not have been aware of, other than the stove smelling hot. It also indicates when the stove is not buring hot enough due to wet wood. I haven't run an F400, but would be surprised that the stove is not running too hot with the air wide open, unless there is low draft and maybe unseasoned wood?
  8. pmac

    pmac Member

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2005
    Messages:
    98
    Loc:
    Eastern PA

    Problems with draft has always been an issue with our setup. Previous homeowner added on a chimney himself for a coal stove - cinder block with 6" round clay liner - that didn't have the right height and distance from the peak of the roof. We got it lengthened last year which has helped a bit...
  9. houblon

    houblon New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2005
    Messages:
    12
    I have the F100. If I leave the damper all open, it will get too hot, especially with dry oak. (it reached 700, measured at the upper right side). If I close it all the way, it will almost extinct the fire and leave unburnt coal.
    I found it to be quite tricky to regulate - the ideal damper setting depends very much on the temperature.
    If it is around 500, I can close it and get a nice burn (on top), but if a fire is starting, the same setting will stop a lively burning fire. But this stove is definitely not for overnight burns...

    B
  10. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    49,832
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    If it is possible, you might try adding a butterfly damper to the stack to have better regulation of the burn.
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page