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Just ordered a Smart-Holder log holder on sale

Post in 'The Gear' started by wetwood, Jan 1, 2010.

  1. YZF1R

    YZF1R New Member

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    Interesting. Thanks for the heads-up.

    Steve

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  2. hariot

    hariot New Member

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    I'm still a little confused about the two versions of this tool. The green one (as seen on amazon for $99:00) states it holds logs up to 9". The orange Remington states it holds up to an 8" width. Are they really both the same tool that actually hold the same size log or does one really have a larger capacity. Anybody know?

    Thanks
  3. precaud

    precaud Minister of Fire

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    The Remington will probably hold larger than 8" logs; the swivel fence is 8" wide, but the opening is 11". The Remington is heavier, weighing 34 lbs vs 27 for the Bailey's. It's natural to suspect that the Remington is a cheap knockoff, but it's not; as stated on the box, it is produced under license of the patent holders. As I said above, this is clearly a distressed inventory sale brought on by the DESA bankruptcy. Think about it; there is absolutely no way these things can be produced and retailed for fifty bucks while giving reasonable profit margins to all parties involved. I'll bet it's less than what Bailey's cost is for theirs.
  4. wetwood

    wetwood Member

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    I weighed the Remington holder on the bathroom scales and it was 28lbs also. Remington holder is made in china. Bailey's says their holder is invented by the Swedish but does not say where it is made. I'll bet there the same holder made in the same Chinese factory just different paint and stickers.
  5. PapaDave

    PapaDave Minister of Fire

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    HAHA, I almost spit out my coffee when right near the end, he decides to blow off a little piece of something. Wouldn't want it getting dirty now, would we? Too funny.
  6. PapaDave

    PapaDave Minister of Fire

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    Steve, that's funny. Blind leading the blind? Next time might be a toaster. HEHE
    Kinda funny too, is that my wife's laptop is taking a nosedive and getting pretty old. I have a Dell acct., so I mentioned new ones. She says, yeah, do that. Hers will be here next Tues., mine the following week.
    Where she leads, I will follow, ....as long as it's a tool or computer stuff. :coolsmile:
  7. precaud

    precaud Minister of Fire

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    Sorry, my bad. On an electric shipping scale, mine also weighs 27 lbs. For some reason the UPS shipping label on the box says 35 lbs., and I was going by that.
  8. PapaDave

    PapaDave Minister of Fire

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    Here's a question for all you smartholder users. How many logs are you doing per session?
    I only ask because when I go out to buck logs, it takes about 60 8'er's on average to get a cord. If I cut in half to load this thing, that's 120 times I have to lift a 4 ft. mini log. Cutting at waist height would be SOOO much easier though.
    I DO hate all the bending over to buck on the ground, then moving the rounds into a pile (and there are 6 rounds/8' log, which is 360 rounds/cord).
    I dunno' you guys might be onto something here. Man, doing the math, I'm getting tired before I even go out to c/s/s.
    I should quit that.
  9. precaud

    precaud Minister of Fire

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    Huh? You don't have to load it.
  10. PapaDave

    PapaDave Minister of Fire

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    The video shows picking up a log, then putting, placing, or loading the log into the jaws.
    Have I got this that basackwards?
  11. precaud

    precaud Minister of Fire

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    Sorry again, too many things going at once in the brain this morning. I meant, you don't have to cut in half before loading.
  12. PapaDave

    PapaDave Minister of Fire

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    HAHA, wanna' bet. I've lifted these things to position for cutting. They're heavy. I am no longer the strong virile youth that I may have thought I once was.
    Sawbuck might fit my needs better, since I could lift one end up, then slide.
    Need to do something to help the back though.
  13. LLigetfa

    LLigetfa Minister of Fire

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    If you're going to cut them into 4 footers then you may as well buck it all on the ground. You don't actually have to lift the entire log. You can lift one end onto the holder, drop the dog, and then lift the other end to set the dog.

    I get my wood in 8 foot lengths and anything I lift goes onto my sawbuck. Lifting onto the sawbuck is more effort than lifting into that holder. Cutting them in half wouldn't work for me as I get 5 rounds out of every log. Stuff too heavy to lift, I roll out onto 3 skids and buck them there. The skids hold the logs up about a foot off the ground so I don't need to bend as much. I shovel out the buildup of sawdust from between the skids.
  14. PapaDave

    PapaDave Minister of Fire

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    Thanks, that's what I was looking for. Good info.
  15. wetwood

    wetwood Member

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    My boys and I got to try out the Remington holder on some 6"- 8" dead trees and here is what we learned so far:

    There is a learning curve with this device but once we figured it out it worked well for us.
    Will not hold crooked logs very well because of horizontal movement.
    Manual states 3/4 of log/limb length must hanging over support frame and that works well.
    Manual states spike frame length must be adjusted to 45 deg so it holds log, and it does need to be close to it.
    After placing log in holder need to push down on end so leverage sinks the teeth into wood to hold it.
    There is always some horizontal movement of the log but the chainsaw holds and cuts it without problem.
    took 2 people to load large logs over 4'-5' long.
    Think it will work even better on 3"- 5" logs.
  16. precaud

    precaud Minister of Fire

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    Thanks for the user report, wetwood.
  17. precaud

    precaud Minister of Fire

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    Update: A friend saw mine and was interested in getting one, so I went back and looked. As was suspected, this was a closeout sale and they are no longer available.
  18. precaud

    precaud Minister of Fire

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    Another update. I used mine for the first time today, bucking logs for a couple hours, and I really like it. Very easy to use. Perfect for 90-95% of the logs I gather. Much easier on the ol' body. And equally important, MUCH easier on the chain. Unless you drop your saw, there is no way for your chain to contact the ground. All in all, highly recommended. It's one of those tools you'll wonder why you never got earlier.
  19. kenny chaos

    kenny chaos Minister of Fire

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    A 25" bar keeps you from bending over when bucking on the ground.
    Having to keep setting the saw down, bending over and lifting a log,
    wrestling it in that contraption and securing it, is for the birds.
    It's not only harder on the body, it take soo much longer.
    But be good consumers and buy, buy, buy.
    Everybody; tweet, tweet, tweet.
  20. precaud

    precaud Minister of Fire

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  21. kenny chaos

    kenny chaos Minister of Fire

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    My new name seems to be Dream Crusher.

    You say you love yours so nothing lost.

    I know when I bend over to put the saw down, it's there for awhile anymore.
  22. precaud

    precaud Minister of Fire

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    Oh, you're being too kind to yourself. Try.... Jerk. You seem to derive great pleasure from acting like one.

    If one organizes the work flow, it's nothing at all like you describe.
  23. kenny chaos

    kenny chaos Minister of Fire

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    You must got's a tooth ache.
    Explain to us how you "organize the work flow" so you're not setting the saw down every 30 seconds or so to load
    another stick. Please?
    It is not for someone with a bad back.
  24. precaud

    precaud Minister of Fire

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    Kenny, so the Smart Holder isn't for you. Big deal. But that doesn't mean you have to trash it. Let it go and move along.

    If a 25" bar works for you, that's great. At 6'5", it wouldn't help me much. But that doesn't mean I have to trash it. Besides, a 25" bar on my Makita electric saw would be silly.

    Maybe some details about my setup wouldn't work well for someone who isn't as tall as I am. I store my logs in 7'x7'x7' stacks so that little (i.e. normal sized) people can't steal them. So there isn't any "bending over to lift a log" until you get to the bottom of the stack. And my saw never gets put down on the ground, it goes on the chopping block, so I don't have to bend over very far. It doesn't weigh very much, anyway.

    Place the Smart Holder in between the log stack and where the splitter goes and the work flow is very smooth. When I was cutting small rounds for the basement stove (that wood is stacked behind the house), I put the wheelbarrow right under the log and the rounds drop right into it as they're cut. No bending over to pick them up like I had to do before.

    So that's why I say, this thing has improved my work flow and I'm bending over less using it.
  25. kenny chaos

    kenny chaos Minister of Fire

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    Don't trash it? It was your, "one of those tools you'll wonder why you never got earlier" that inspired me to post.
    I explained why it's no good for regular size people with regular saws.
    This ain't even your thread. Don't take it so personal.

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