Kiln dried in Northern NJ?

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by JimFNJ, Jan 30, 2013.

  1. JimFNJ

    JimFNJ
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    I underestimated my wood requirements for my first burning season, and find myself with nothing left. I have gone down the CL road and learned that lesson the hard way. So, does anyone have any good sources for kiln dried wood in NNJ? Has anyone bought from "Max is Back" on Rt. 23 in Butler? Their sign indicates that they have kiln dried wood, but I don't know if they mean "bundle" size, or what.

    Alternatively, if anyone in the Lincoln Park (or Morris/Passaic/Essex) area finds themselves with more well-seasoned wood than they know what to do with, I have a bunch of split unseasoned oak I'd be willing to trade.

    I'm looking for less than a full cord, probably in the neighborhood of 1/4 cord or a face cord.

    Thanks,
    Jim
     

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  2. tbuff

    tbuff
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    Maybe try cutting the stuff you have really small. Won't be great, but it'll be some heat.
     
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  3. jdp1152

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    Jim....find a wood fired pizza or wood fired grill restaurant in your area and find out who their supplier is. You'll be able to get bulk for sure from those guys.
     
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  4. midwestcoast

    midwestcoast
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    Or pick-up some bio-bricks or similar if you don't mind the cost.
     
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  5. KaptJaq

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  6. JimFNJ

    JimFNJ
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    Thanks for the replies everyone!

    I'm just so sick of having to buy firewood. I have a cord of unseasoned wood on my deck for next year, and unfortunately nowhere to store any more large quantities of wood since I'm a renter. And from what everyone has told me in the other thread I posted, the cord of unseasoned oak I have might not even be ready for next year anyway. It's frustrating.

    I've learned my lessons, I just wish I had found this site sooner.
     
  7. jdp1152

    jdp1152
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    Everyone learns the lesson at some point if they have an EPA stove. Don't beat yourself up over it. I'm riding out what I hope is my last time buying wood (like what you're trying to do, I picked up 1/3 cord of kiln dried). That being said, if I could find a decent price on C/S green wood, I'd probably only scrounge around the neighborhood. I don't want a pick up and don't really have anywhere to put a hauling trailer. Loading up the 4runner, doesn't exactly pack a whole lot.
     
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  8. midwestcoast

    midwestcoast
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    Man, that is going to be tough trying to season your own if you only have room for one cord. Think you need to get creative & try to find a way/place to store more.
    So if you can scrounge or buy a cord of fast drying stuff (like Ash, Cherry, Soft Maple, Pine...) in late winter/early spring when you have the room, split small & stacked loose & open to the wind it can be okay (not perfect) to burn the next winter. You are still going to need to buy some truelly seasoned/kiln dried in mid winter to get you through. It's always hard to find.
    Compressed wood bricks may be a good option for you to stretch your supplies. They are pricey (so is kiln-dried in January I bet) and they differ a lot by brand, but they are easy to use and take up much less room than cordwood does. You might even be able to stack a pallet load of them inside. Read up: http://www.hearth.com/talk/threads/pressed-wood-logs.71726/
     
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