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laddomat 21 thermoregulator cost

Post in 'The Boiler Room - Wood Boilers and Furnaces' started by atlarge54, Dec 17, 2007.

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  1. atlarge54

    atlarge54 New Member

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    I've always liked the Cozy Heat web site because prices of equip. were easily available, be sure to check their ad from the Boiler Room once in a while to help pay the bills. I was just looking at a pdf file of EKO-line and saw a laddomat 21 thermoregulator but couldn't find a price. That looks to be quite a piece of engineering wonder how bulletproof it is? Has anyone had a gassifier running for over 5 years? What are the costs and life expectancies of the refractory materials? The Blue Forge looks like it might use standard fire bricks stacked together and is simple compared to the rest. This forum sure has a wealth of knowledge and real life experience to be shared. Gassifiers sure look sweet but wood is pretty cheap and it's nice to know I can replace any part on my system with an "always in stock" item at the local supply house KISS is hard to beat. We had a hard snow (for us) abt 12" and while I was out shoveling snow I was a little surprised to see snow on my chimney cap several hours (Temp was abt 30 deg. F) after the snow quit and the boiler had called for heat at least once maybe twice and the cap is less than two feet from the boiler. I'd like to see some of the resident gurus start a thread on heat storage water versus solid (stone sand etc.) water storage seems to have lots of issues corrosion, expansion, treatments, anti freeze, etc. I know the defenition of a BTU involves 1 Lb. of water but does it also apply to 1 Lb. of concrete or granite or is there a specific heat for different materials? I know water is king when it comes to heat transfer but what about after all the other variables.

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  2. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson Mod Emeritus

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    Hi atlarge54. Welcome to the Boiler Room.

    What are you heating with now?
  3. atlarge54

    atlarge54 New Member

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    Old junk global hydronics modified with copper coils around firebox and original water cavity filled with pea gravel the blower is disarmed the aquastat only opens port for combustion air and pex in floor radiant. I don't need any storage, between the mass of the stove and the floor everything seems to work pretty smoothly. HI-Tech (ha-ha) components are original solenoid on stove, open on limit aquastat, Taco 011 runs 24/7, Taco 009 on floor loop with manual switch (on all winter) wall mounted thermostat runs fan on water to air exchanger (which only runs when temps get nasty). The thing I'm most amazed with is how the floor loop holds such a steady room temp. with outdoor temp. swings seemingly not that important. One feature of an OWB which isn't mentiond often is their ability to burn the big nasty odd shapes and crotch wood others can't use. In my opinion the OWB design with blower induced combustion like Global Hydronics designed is almost a criminal waste of resources, kind of like driving a Hummer two blocks to the 7-11 for a slurpee.
  4. Seyiwmz

    Seyiwmz Member

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    Hi Atlarge, I talked to Zenon, from new horizons, and the Laddomat 21 goes for $360 and then add shipping.
  5. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson Mod Emeritus

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    I don't know. The EKO 60 will take about as big a chunk as I can handle. The firebox isn't that much smaller than a typical OWB.
  6. atlarge54

    atlarge54 New Member

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    Thanks for the info. Seyiwmz, $360 seems pretty reasonable considering what the pump does. Eric what is the firebox size (cu. ft.) and door size of your 60?
  7. Nofossil

    Nofossil Moderator Emeritus

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    Gasifier has two benefits: Clean exhaust and significant reduction in wood use. Two drawbacks: Higher initial cost and moderately higher complexity.

    Water has a much higher thermal coefficient than stone, and stores quite a bit more heat per cubic foot. It also requires less heat exchanger, as convection carries heat to and from areas that aren't adjacent to the HX coils much better than conduction through stone or concrete. Adding rocks to a water storage tanks reduces the amount of heat that you can store. Counterintuitive, but true.
  8. atlarge54

    atlarge54 New Member

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    What are the numbers used in engineering terms to explain this phenomenon? A cubic foot of granite which is obviously heavier than equal volume of water can be heated to a higher temp. using less energy? Yes counterintuitive is a good choice of words. I understand the eneygy loss and gain related to water and phase changes, but for straight temp. differentials I don't get it. It's been a long time since I've seen a classroom, help me teacher. Thanks
  9. atlarge54

    atlarge54 New Member

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    I guess I found my own answer about specific heat. Water has a specific heat of about 4 while granite is about 0.8 so 5lb of granite will replace 1lb of water. Even more would be required when rate of transfer is considered. Is this about right?
  10. slowzuki

    slowzuki Feeling the Heat

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    Yup. And if you use water to get the heat to the granite, you still can't work at a much higher temp than straight water storage.
  11. Nofossil

    Nofossil Moderator Emeritus

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    It's a good question, and I remember scratching my head the first time I ran the numbers.

    There's lots more energy involved if you can design across a phase change - solid to liquid, or liquid to gas. Paraffin can store more heat per cubic foot because of the energy required to melt it.

    Now, if you could operate at temperatures where you could melt that granite, we'd be talking....
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