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Lange 6302 & Cubic Feet

Post in 'Classic Wood Stove Forums (prior to approx. 1993)' started by Jafo, Jul 1, 2012.

  1. Jafo

    Jafo Member

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    I have a 30' yurt up in the Adirondacks and while taking with a relative of mine about how I hadn't got a wood stove for it yet, he actually gave me an old one he had in a shed at his camp.. It is a Lange 6302A and you can see the specs here if you put in the model # etc:

    http://www.woodmanspartsplus.com/catalog.aspx?ct_id=68

    Anyway, I am pretty sure this stove is more than enough to heat the yurt, but then again I have very little knowledge in this area. My yurt has reflective insulation just like most yurts have which is great for reflecting radiant heat but when you break it all down, it is still a really large tent. Here is a pic of the insulation while we were building it:

    1-albums1-picture37[1].jpg

    Anyway, in the manual it says it can heat 7,000 to 9,000 cubic feet. Is there any way to convert this # to BTU's? The yurt manual says you probably need a stove that can push out at least 40,000 BTU's.

    Thoughts?

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  2. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    I have a friend heating a yurt with a Morso 2110 comfortably down to about 15F. If the Lange is in good condition it should do a decent job. But if it's minus 10 outside, anything is going to feel cold. Be sure the stove is in good operating condition and has no cracks or warped burn plates. Have several cords of really dry wood on hand, split, stacked and covered, if you are going to try to live there. You can store a lot right under the yurt. Otherwise it's going to be miserable. And be careful how the flue is connected. I posted a thread on this a couple years ago.
  3. Jafo

    Jafo Member

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    The yurt is just a camp. There is no electricity, cell phone service, etc. out there (inside the blue line). We do plan on snowmobiling/shoeing in there in the winter but I doubt we will be doing that when it gets 10 below. I still wish I knew how many BTU's the thing put out.. It is a pretty cool looking stove.. Here are some pics I found online that are identical except mine is blue:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
  4. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    If that is as nice inside as it is outside, your relative is giving you a real gift. These stoves are very respectable heaters. The 6302A is rated to heat 7-9000 cu ft. If this is a 30ft yurt the volume is about 7000 cu ft. With good dry hardwood, I think you will be fine with heating with this stove. The trick is to have plenty of split dry wood on hand.

    Take good care of the stove, this is a real gem, almost too nice and valuable to put in a camp.
  5. Jafo

    Jafo Member

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    It looks good on the inside, but I have to do a better inspection next time I am up there just to make sure. Thanks! :)
  6. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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  7. Jafo

    Jafo Member

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    Thanks for that.. I was thinking of using the steel pole myself. I see you made the stack really high. Was that for any reason?
  8. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Steel is good if you have a way of getting it up there. You might also check around for used metal light poles like they use on highways.

    The installation has an EPA stove which requires stronger draft. It's a little under height and there is a little smoke spill when the weather is mild, but it draws ok considering. Once it gets cold outside it's fine. Also, the owner lived in a camp tent one year and the top caught fire (in the rain) in the dry area of the canvas abobe the stove because of embers falling out of the short chimney. Fortunately they caught it right away and the damage was repairable. Moral of the story, try to keep the flue a good distance away from the roof and be sure your cap is screened.
  9. Jafo

    Jafo Member

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    Ahh ok. I am definitely putting a spark arrester on mine, but I am a little weary of putting the stack up so high. I know code dictates it should be 2' higher than the highest part of the roof within 10', but that seems like SO much pipe.

    My other problem is that the ground where this is going is VERY rocky. It is what I call glacier gravel. Getting through a lot of it was like chipping away at an old gravel driveway. I think finding a spot where I can get at least 4' down into the ground will be hard and will most likely determine where the pipe will go more than prevailing winds.
  10. Jafo

    Jafo Member

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    I ended up buying a 21', 2" galvanized pipe. The weekend after next, we are going to put it up (my brother and I). He thought the stove looked good, but we are going to scrub it out and reseal anything that doesn't look tight. Here are a couple pics of the inside of the yurt w/ the stove:

    1-albums2-picture61[1].jpg

    1-albums2-picture59[1].jpg
  11. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    21 ft? is that a typo? That's really tall.

    The stove is going to be great. Do you have a hearth for it?
  12. Jafo

    Jafo Member

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    Nope, 21 feet. It is about 10 feet from the ground to where the pipe will come out of the wall (see first pic). We are going to try to get it a couple feet into the ground too, even though it is as hard as a stone driveway lol.. Once we get everything dry fit, I will be putting down a stone hearth, in fact, I already have all the materials to do it.
  13. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    A 21' stick will have a huge amount of leverage. I wouldn't be comfortable with that less than 4 ft in the ground, set in cement. Rent a gas powered jack hammer if necessary.
  14. Jafo

    Jafo Member

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    I just got done spending an ENORMOUS amount of time posting the story and all the pics of this project at yurt forum and I am not going to do that again. Suffice it to say that we tore the stove down cleaned it all out with a wire brush and resealed it. Here are the pics of the chimney and stove and the rest of the story:

    http://www.yurtforum.com/forums/building-a-yurt-f3/the-yurt-chimney-137.html
    jjs777_fzr likes this.
  15. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Thanks for the link, the stove looks great. I'll bet you're glad to have the warmth!
  16. jjs777_fzr

    jjs777_fzr Feeling the Heat

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    Found this article on the forum re: the Lange - might be an interesting read for you.
    http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=...xoHQDw&usg=AFQjCNHoV592-016QtO_OlJCXG7QJlkTKA

    Re the BTU - for comparison the Upland 27 is rated at 5875cuft and 33,750BTUs. It holds a 20" log compared to the Lange 6302A 24" capacity. Both stoves use the S-flow design.
  17. Jafo

    Jafo Member

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    Thanks. So far the stove heats nice, but I really have only tried it out in the 40's. Will find out soon enough if it can handle it. ;)

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