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  1. Morso1bo

    Morso1bo New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2011
    Messages:
    53
    Loc:
    western new hampshire
    Hi,
    My new forty year old stove puts out much more radiant heat than my Morso 1bo did. With the stack temperature between 300 and 350 degrees (just where I ran the old Morso) things around the new Lange get much hotter. I am wondering what I can do to tone down the immediate radiant heat so I do not melt my dishwasher that is 3'6" away. The hearth pad is much warmer too. This added heat will be great come winter, but I want the thing to be safe. Is there away to put fire brick along the sides? It has burn plates on both sides, and the back. Any suggestions would be welcomed.
    Thanks

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  2. jimbom

    jimbom Combustion Analyzer

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2010
    Messages:
    1,022
    Loc:
    Missouri Ozarks
    My old Atlanta Stoveworks AC5 has exterior heat shields. Both sides and the back. She is not a beauty queen, but sure heats well and runs nice. Some stoves I have looked at have bottom heat shields.
  3. Morso1bo

    Morso1bo New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2011
    Messages:
    53
    Loc:
    western new hampshire
    Thanks for your input, I will look into some kind of heat shield, even a hearth pad to lean up against the dishwasher.
  4. Wood Heat Stoves

    Wood Heat Stoves Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2009
    Messages:
    1,899
    Loc:
    Nevada City, California
    Your Lange puts out radiant heat like you get from the sun. Any non combustible shield that is not in direct contact with the dishwasher that blocks the radiant heat waves will work. Simplest solution would be a sheet metal shield painted with high temperature stove paint.
  5. Morso1bo

    Morso1bo New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2011
    Messages:
    53
    Loc:
    western new hampshire
    Thanks for your input. I was thinking about putting firebrick around the lower part of the sides, and on the bottom (which it came with) as an attempt to cut down on some of the radient heat. I was also thinking of getting a metal hearth pad to lean against the counter when the stove is running.
  6. Wood Heat Stoves

    Wood Heat Stoves Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2009
    Messages:
    1,899
    Loc:
    Nevada City, California
    My recollection of the Lange was that it didn't use firebrick on the sides, but may have on the bottom. The metal hearthpad standing as a barrier to the radiant heat would be the best idea. Just remember that if it's in direct contact with what you're protecting, the heat will just transfer through it. There needs to be at least a 1" air gap.
  7. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    45,834
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    I'm not sure there's a risk to the dishwasher. If the surface is like 120F it should be fine.
  8. Morso1bo

    Morso1bo New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2011
    Messages:
    53
    Loc:
    western new hampshire
    I have used a heavy duty fire screen with some victorian silver tin cieling (left over from my wall protector) strung to it to block the heat. It is doing a good job. I am still stunned at how much hotter this stove is than my old Morso. The bottom of the stove has a baffel, but the folks who rebuilt it said that it did not need fire bricks. It probably would not hurt to put some in any way. Thanks again for the input.
  9. Lyman51

    Lyman51 Member

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2008
    Messages:
    9
    Loc:
    Southern Vermont
    I just found this thread and have some thoughts. First of all, that is a great stove - too bad they didn't make the EPA cut. IMHO, what the EPA saw as flaws, I see as personality.
    I have not owned a 6302 but have several family members who do (or did) and I can ask them anything you want. I had the smaller one once and have used the 6302 from time to time. I don't see where you mention the interior plates? Without them it seems obvious you'd get a lot of wall heat but those plates save the exterior from over-heating, and since a lot of folks had them crack (the protective plates, I mean), they must have been necessary. I know I've had my one-walled Morso 2B glowing reddish and it can't be a good idea. Hard to believe you'd need the plates plus firebrick? Also, if you put a full load of good wood in and keep it low or at 'medium', the wood itself will buffer the heat a bit as the middle of the load will burn first with the air shooting in that way. But you still need the plates.
    Also, the two valves are a real plus - you're right about the lower one (or both) being for a fast start, and then the upper one is used to deliver pre-heated air. That stove has a personality; you'll get to know each other soon enough.
    If you're lucky, someday you'll find the matching enameled stove pipe from Lange. I haven't seen any in 30 years; in my family they're all blue stoves with blue pipe.
    I want to add for anyone reading this that somewhere out there in this great land are a few of the 6302's with TWO arches on top - the first one is the oven and then there is an open arch on top of that (I think it was just the same as oven but with no doors fitted). A shop in central Ohio had one in Red in 1980 but I think it closed and the stove moved on. I remember hearing that were a total of 8 stoves which were made like that. If anyone finds one, please track me down - it's always stuck in my mind as the ultimate wood stove.
  10. Morso1bo

    Morso1bo New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2011
    Messages:
    53
    Loc:
    western new hampshire
    Thanks for your insight into my Lange. I have been getting use to it and think the extra heat out put is due to the "S" flow the smoke must take before it goes up the chimney. It is almost like a key damper effect as it keeps a lot of the heat in the stove. My old Morso (which was a good heater) must have let a lot more heat go right up the chimney. When my stove pipe thermometer is at 300 degrees it throws way more heat than the Morso did at 350 or 400 degrees for that matter. I did put fire brick on the floor of the stove, even though I was told it was not necessary. It had fire brick when I bought it so I figured it would help protect the bottom of the stove for another 30 years. I posted a picture of my Lange in the gallery on this sight. If you just search for Lange you will see it (only green 6302K on the sight) in my kitchen. Did any of your realatives ever have any luck baking with the oven? Thanks again
  11. Lyman51

    Lyman51 Member

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2008
    Messages:
    9
    Loc:
    Southern Vermont
    It is a beautiful stove, and you'll be showing it off for a long time. In truth everyone I know only used the oven part as a novelty (pot of chili once in a while, etc.), but my wife and I did a soufle on a BBQ once, so the possibilities are endless! We cook on woodstoves a lot; I have a cast iron trivet I'd use in your oven to keep the pot from being directly on the stove top. A yard sale item for sure.
    Food always tastes better when you hauled the wood to cook it with. Good Luck!
  12. Morso1bo

    Morso1bo New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2011
    Messages:
    53
    Loc:
    western new hampshire
    Thanks. It will be fun experimenting with it.

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