Liner costs

Swedishchef Posted By Swedishchef, Jan 28, 2013 at 9:52 PM

  1. Swedishchef

    Swedishchef
    Minister of Fire 2.
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    Jan 17, 2010
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    Hey guys

    A friend of mine is looking at passing a liner down his brick chimney. He currently has a wood stove but his chimney is in dire need of repair and I suggested he install a liner.

    27 feet is the height of his chimney. Any ideas what the cost would be?

    ANdrew

    PS, I live in Canada....
     
  2. TheBaron

    TheBaron
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    Dec 27, 2012
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    What type of wood stove is it, and what is the outlet size on the stove?

    The existing masonry chimney, what size is it (it will dictate what kind of liner you can use, and hence costs)
     
  3. Swedishchef

    Swedishchef
    Minister of Fire 2.
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    Jan 17, 2010
    3,239
    683
    Loc:
    Quebec, Canada
    Sorry, I should have known to include the details. The stove needs a 6 inch liner and the chimney is 9X9.

    ANdrew
     
  4. HaTaX

    HaTaX
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    Jan 19, 2013
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    Minnesota
    If the ID of the flue is at least 7 1/4" you should be able to get an insulated and wrapped round liner down that with no problem. There's quite a few options out there but I'd give a rough guess of $550-600 on the low side and maybe 800-900 on the top end, that's just materials though. Recently I have been researching it quite a bit and there's many different ways to skin this cat, however I would make sure that you're in compliance with local fire code with whatever you end up doing. I think Canada has more strict / better policies regarding relining of chimneys and such, so you'll want to make note of that as you're digging around.

    For my install I think I'll end up going with a DuraLiner rigid oval system which is on the higher end, but has great specifications and can essentially be a chimney all by itself so I don't need to be as worried about the state of repair in my existing chimney. Might be worth looking into this type of an option if the drop is relatively straight with no offsets, this way you can be assured the poor condition of his chimney wouldn't put the system at risk.

    What kind of appliance is at the other end? Newer or older wood stove? Reason I ask is creosote buildup in older stoves means you will be cleaning more often, worth it to consider a "tougher" liner to handle the more frequent cleanings, thin flex liners may not take well to 2-3 cleanings a year.
     

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