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Log Splitter

Post in 'The Gear' started by RoosterBoy, Oct 23, 2006.

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  1. yukiginger

    yukiginger Member

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    Correction: I do the pin-pulling from the other side, the non-engine, non-valve side (your pics help).

    Mark

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  2. velvetfoot

    velvetfoot Minister of Fire

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    Thanks Mark. I'll try that knee thing at some point.
    It's a tradeoff on the dolly/ramp versus ease of jockeying, I guess - both very do-able though.
    The unit is in hibernation now until who knows when.
    One question I did have is how the safety chains attach; the manual doesn't mention that at all.
    Thanks very much.
  3. Christine

    Christine New Member

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    New to message boards and all of this.....Just a lady needing some advice......Wanting to buy my father a log splitter for Xmas (he just had shoulder surgery).....their home is heated and cooled year round with wood.....looking at a Huskee 6.5 hp,22 ton, Briggs Stratton engine, 11gpm, 26 in capacity, 17 qt. res.........for $999.....Is this a good purchase.....will he need to upgrade? Is an extended warranty a good idea?

    Thanks
  4. MrGriz

    MrGriz New Member

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    Welcome Christine. What an awesome Christmas gift!

    That capacity should more than take care of your Father's needs. I don't have any direct experience with the Huskee brand, but the specifications and price seem good to me. I bought my North Star at Northern Tool and Equipment for similar money. Velvetfoot just purchased the Harbor Freight model at about the same price and seems happy. Briggs is a good engine, but I am partial to the Honda engine myself. That thing starts easily and runs strong.

    Good luck and keep asking questions as they come up.
  5. Corey

    Corey Minister of Fire

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    That seems to be a pretty good combination of price and power. Should make one happy father.

    I'm curious that you say the house is "heated and cooled" with wood. Wondering if that is a typo or is he really running some type of wood fired absorption cooling? If so, I think that may be a first for hearthnet! I'd love to hear any specs or operating details of that unit!

    Corey
  6. Woodsroad

    Woodsroad Member

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    Christine, I've looked at that splitter and thought that it was an excellent combination of weight and practicality. Seems to be well made, yet you can move it around without a lot of effort. That said, I did go ahead and order the HF 30 ton. But i'm always buying stuff that is big, just because, well...it's big. I do have a Briggs 5.5 hp engine on a lawn vac and it's really a perfectly good engine. Starts easily and runs strong. Your dad will be happy with the splitter. Does he have a place to keep it under cover?

    -dan
  7. velvetfoot

    velvetfoot Minister of Fire

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    Dan,
    You did order the 30-tonner?!
    Just be careful when assembling - it's very heavy.
    The jacks and "cribbing" method worked but my cribbing was very flakey.

    PS: I don't know if you read my above post, but stupid me had a problem with the on/off switch on the Robin! It has a "pointer" on the end that "really" points to "on" or "off". Once I discovered the magic trick of how to make spark, it started up great.


    Consumer Reports says that extended warranties are usually a waste of money.
    They're pretty simple devices. If it doesn't work out during the the shakeout duration of the mfr's warranty, I would guess that something bad might not happen for a while using it at a homeowner's rate. Then again, maybe only using once a year or two might not be good for things; I don't know. A splitter for me would probably be used way less than my snowblower or lawnmower, but they've worked year after year (knock on wood).

    Another thing you could get your father if he doesn't have them are those ear muffs that muffle the sound. I've used them a lot - a lot more than I thought I would - when running small-engined machines. They are very convenient (much more so than the foam plugs) and effective. (I have the hardhat with built in face screen and muffs but that's overkill for stuff like snowblowing.) Plus maybe some eye and face protection stuff.
  8. Woodsroad

    Woodsroad Member

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    Velvetfoot,

    I intend to get that crate into my outbuilding, where I have an overhead electric hoist, made by....Harbor freight. I've been working on a project building a pressure washer, using a 15 hp 4 cylinder engine, so that hoist has been useful. Either way, the splitter is now backordered again, until early February. We'll see what happens. If the delay goes on much beyond that date, I'll have to buy something else.

    Good advice on the ear muffs. They also keep your ears warm.

    -Dan
  9. velvetfoot

    velvetfoot Minister of Fire

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    Dan,

    I forgot you had that overhead hoist.
    That is one bad pressure washer!

    I never thought I'd use those muffs so much - very convenient.

    Karl
  10. Woodsroad

    Woodsroad Member

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    4 gpm @4000 psi
    I found the pump, new, on eBay for $100. It's a top of the line GP pump. Engine was bought used, along with four others just like it, for $35. I'll have a number of new parts that I will have to buy, including a hose reel and wand, but it should be pretty amazing when done.
  11. Woodsroad

    Woodsroad Member

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    BTW, I've made it a habit of mounting a digital RPM/Hour meter on every 4-stroke gas-engine item that I have. I could never really estimate hours of use, so this gizmo tells you exactly how many hours you have on an engine, and it helps keep an eye on RPM's.

    http://www.tinytach.com/tinytach/index.php

    The Robin-Subaru engines would use the TT226NR-2C or TT226R-2C

    These have an internal battery that lasts about 5 years, the only downside. You can split them open and replace the battery, if you are so inclined and able.

    Attached Files:

  12. velvetfoot

    velvetfoot Minister of Fire

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    I have one of those on my generator only it doesn't have a reset button.
    I forgot where I got mine though - somewhere on the internet.
    Price could add up if all the engines had them, though maybe in the long run it wouldn't be that bad.
    I didn't know it's possible to change out the battery - might affect its water tightness though.
  13. Woodsroad

    Woodsroad Member

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    I kind of see it as engine insurance. Unless you keep a detailed log book on each engine (who can do THAT?), I find this an easy way to change oil/filters etc every 25 hours and do the bigger issues of cleaning carbon off the head and resetting valve clearances when the time comes. It just makes it very easy. The RPM's help to diagnose problems before they get bad, like mower deck spindle bearings. Plus, you have something to look at while you are cutting the lawn ;-)
  14. Bones

    Bones Member

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    New to the forums with a problem. Just built an electric log splitter and worked Ok,now a few days later (and 30° colder) pump barely turns over. I have used
    ( per recomendations) Chevron ISO 68 and is tooooo thick. Is there anyway to thin this out or best to just flush system with 10W AW hyd. fluid ¿
    Thanks Bones
  15. Roospike

    Roospike New Member

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    The"PUMP" wont turn over or the "engine" wont turn over ?

    Is the pump belt driven or direct drive ?
  16. Bones

    Bones Member

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    It's a 2hp electric motor direct drive. It does turn over very slowly. It's suppose to be warmer next week, so I want to change the hyd. fluid.
    Thanks
  17. Roospike

    Roospike New Member

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    I missed the electric part i guess.
  18. FuzzyOne

    FuzzyOne Member

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    When I know that I will be splitting, I put a heater on my tank to warm the fluid. I run AW32, and it does get thick. A portable propane heater works pretty fast also. The magnetic one needs to be on a few hours. Here is a link to what I'm talking about:

    http://tractorsupply.com/detail.asp?pcID=4&paID=1032&sonID=65&page=1&productID=17044
  19. Bones

    Bones Member

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    When I know that I will be splitting, I put a heater on my tank to warm the fluid. I run AW32, and it does get thick. A portable propane heater works pretty fast also. The magnetic one needs to be on a few hours. Here is a link to what I'm talking about:

    http://tractorsupply.com/detail.asp?pcID=4&paID=1032&sonID=65&page=1&productID=17044[/quote]

    Now that looks interesting.

    I'm still going to check out other hyd. fluid.
  20. Woodsroad

    Woodsroad Member

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    OK, I promised to post when the HF 30 ton splitter arrived.

    It arrived.

    Let me say this up front: If you do not have the experience and capabilities to move a 600#, 6'x 3.5' crate off of a semi (deck height, about 4' ) and into a covered place with either an engine hoist or overhead hoist, do not even consider this machine. I suppose if you have four strong guys, you could wrestle it around a bit, but you really need to know what you are doing, or you could get squished.

    That said, I was feeling "capable" after having survived moving a 900#, 6' bio fume hood all by myself, so when the call came from Yellow Freight carriers yesterday, I swung into action. My driveway is 150', gravel and uneven. It's another 50' to my outbuilding. You can not get a semi down the drive because of two tight bends and lots of rocks and trees close to the drive. There is 4" of compressed snow and sleet on the ground. I got the old Cub Cadet 122 running and put the wheel weights and chains on, pulled out the garden dump cart, which is rated at 1500#, and cut a piece of 3/4 plywood and bolted it to the top. This gave me a rolling platform about 3' off the ground. The plywood added rigidity, and gave a place to drop the crate on an even surface. I hemmed and hawed about the plywood yesterday, and I'm glad I did it.

    The driver arrived, in the rain, and was dubious, but assisted me in tilting the crate off the truck bed and onto the cart. The cart held. We fastened it down with 3" ratcheting tie downs, he wished me good luck, and left. The trip down the driveway was uneventful, but gut wrenching as the load swayed back and forth. When they rate these carts, it must be a static load, at bed level, on a level surface, just before the tires pop.

    I had to back the last 50' down to the outbuilding because of ice, but everything held. Putting on my HF rubber-coated work gloves ($1.00 a pair last week) and grabbing my handy HF hammer and pry bar, I set about uncrating this beast. It comes split in half, beam and cylinder section on one side, undercarriage and engine on the other. You can separate the two by disconnecting two hoses. I backed the cart up to the outbuilding, carefully tilted the bed down with the "dump" feature. There's an overhead hoist in the outbuilding, so I pulled the line outside, hooked it to the skid and pulled it into the building.

    All told, it took me an hour and a half, off the truck and under cover inside. And I didn't injure myself. If it was a dry summer day, it probably would have taken half that time.

    My first impression is that this thing is a beast. My second impression is that this thing is a beast. I'll give you my third impression when i start to assemble it.
  21. FuzzyOne

    FuzzyOne Member

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    Lots of pics too please.
  22. Woodsroad

    Woodsroad Member

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    I'll make pix as I assemble. No pix of it coming off the truck, etc because I was *little* busy using my hands for other things. ;-)
  23. velvetfoot

    velvetfoot Minister of Fire

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    See pics I took of mine earlier in thread.
    The "cribbing" I built 'cause of no hoist was my adventuresome part.
    Thankfully, no injuries.
  24. velvetfoot

    velvetfoot Minister of Fire

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    Don't forget, the on/off switch position wasn't exactly intuitive for me.
  25. Woodsroad

    Woodsroad Member

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    How did you go about bleeding the system?
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