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masonry stoves who has one lets see some pics!!!!

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by argus66, Dec 26, 2011.

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  1. argus66

    argus66 Feeling the Heat

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    hey who on here has a masonry stove/ fireplace the best heating system ever. im really thinking of building one in my house one day. 2 chords of wood for a whole winter of burning im in....

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  2. argus66

    argus66 Feeling the Heat

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    anyone maybe wrong forms for this
  3. rwhite

    rwhite Minister of Fire

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    Search for masonry heaters. I've seen a few posts on here about them.
  4. jeff_t

    jeff_t Minister of Fire

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    Not very many here. Marty S has one and loves it. Woodstock has had pics on their blog, I think, of one that they build.

    On can my list of things to do, when I have an unlimited budget. I would design a house around one.
  5. argus66

    argus66 Feeling the Heat

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    ya i think my house is to small but ive seen kits now made for smaller houses.
  6. cmonSTART

    cmonSTART Minister of Fire

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    Masonry heaters are great! A guy in my town built one (retired stone mason) and it's BEAUTIFUL! I really wish I had some pictures.
  7. Ehouse

    Ehouse Minister of Fire

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    I just rescued a small Tulikivi from demolition. Search Mountain Flame Heaters, it's the top right picture on their home page. Can't be moved in one piece as I found out. Hard to find anyone willing or able to advise on reconstruction. This model ( T 750 C ) is rated to heat about 650 square feet. It weighs +- 2000 lbs.

    Ehouse
  8. woodmiser

    woodmiser New Member

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    So it's a rocket stove?
  9. argus66

    argus66 Feeling the Heat

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    there is a dealer in the catskills maybe they can help u just found them last night online.
  10. Ehouse

    Ehouse Minister of Fire

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    Not a rocket stove, but a contraflow design where the heated exhaust travels through a couple of vertical switchbacks before exiting the chimney. Some have heated benches like a rocket stove, but the fire box is more conventional. The soapstone (including the firebrick) soaks up the heat and releases it slowly. Supposedly, only 2 firings per 24 hrs. maintain even temps. Some are now sold in kit form for DYI.

    Ehouse
  11. Ehouse

    Ehouse Minister of Fire

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    The original installer of the heater I scored is probably one and the same, and would offer no help or advice unless they were to come and do the rebuild. I can understand their position, I suppose, so I've started gathering the info. elsewhere.

    Ehouse
  12. Martin Strand III

    Martin Strand III New Member

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    TempCast masonry heater, about 8 years old and still cookin' (and about 7000 lbs)
    * refractory "floating" contraflow core
    * solid brick over core
    * tile veneer over brick

    See it here:
    Sorry, it's in the hearth.com gallery, fireplaces, "tilestone" about
    5 pages in from the beginning

    Aye,
    Marty
  13. fossil

    fossil Accidental Moderator Staff Member

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  14. nelraq

    nelraq Member

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    Tulikivi masonary heaters are designed to be taken apart and reassembed in another location. Looks like you've got a real 'find' there!!!

    I had a Temp Cast unit built into my last house. Worked great! I used 2x4 and 2x6 construction scraps. It never saw a piece of 'cordwood'. 2 fires a day kept the house comfortably warm 24 hours per day.

    "Twas a 'bit' too big and heavy to move when I moved. NO.....I didn't get my investment back when I sold the house. It was considered by the realtors/new owners as just another brick fireplace.
  15. Ehouse

    Ehouse Minister of Fire

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    Marty S, That's a nice install. Did you do it yourself? Is the bake oven a good usable feature? I'm thinking of adding one if I get the info. to rebuild this.

    Nelraq, Tempcast seems to be the most popular kit. Do you know where I might find info. on a Tulikivi Rebuild? specifically, type of refractory cement, insulating spacer material, grout for the outside seams and firebox design? My local installer won't help unless they do the rebuild. I've scoured the internet for specifics to little or no avail.

    Ehouse
  16. Martin Strand III

    Martin Strand III New Member

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    I'm not that handy with handling 175 lb refractory core "lego" style blocks, so, no I didn't build it. Not to mention the poured footing with rebar, foundation about 8' tall with CMBs and poured concrete cap with more rebar all "absolutely" level and plumb. It's a man made monolith of about 4 tons or better (the "mass" in 'thermal mass' heater).

    Since the masonry portion was less strenuous (bricks and tile) but required some tricks near chimney, floor damper and both doors, I decided to let the pros do it all. It was a good choice. The penalty for screwing it up is rather nasty considering if too much air spaces are left in the mortar, the wrong grout, the bricks are not solid or properly filled, expansion joints are not spaced correctly or the chimney insulation is not up to snuff - well - 'fire burns' is all you need to know.

    My next one (veneer) is going to be all solid brick pavers.

    Refractory grout came with the core pieces. email TempCast may/maynot be helpful. Exterior grout contained some latex something which has worked well since in my 8th season, I have no cracks.

    The spacer between the floating core and the brick/tile veneer I could have done. Simply one layer of corragated cardboard.

    The bake oven is a joy. With flames just out and coals aplenty it's too hot for most sane cooking. Timing is the thing to master. Pizzas hot and fast to slow cookin' is all simply timing.

    Aye,
    Marty
  17. nelraq

    nelraq Member

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    Sorry, I can't help you with the rebuilding details but suggest that you contact a Tulikivi dealer/installer. They will probably give you basic directions if you purchase the necessary supplies from them.
  18. firecracker_77

    firecracker_77 Minister of Fire

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    Masonry heaters are awesome after studying about them for the last 3 hours. This will be something I dream about for some time. They are really beautiful and an architectural feature in a house. They can be custom built with any stone or brick finish. What a great idea
  19. Martin Strand III

    Martin Strand III New Member

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    Typical 50 lb fuel load ablaze with 600 AM morning coffee.
    The bake oven will be cool enough to roast a chicken by 500 PM.

    Aye,
    Marty

    Attached Files:

  20. firecracker_77

    firecracker_77 Minister of Fire

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    That's sexy!
  21. firecracker_77

    firecracker_77 Minister of Fire

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    Before today, I wondered why those things needed to be so big and expensive. I did not understand a normal size firebox and a massive stone surface. Now, I understand with all the internal switchbacks trapping heat in that gigantic thermal mass. Eventually, the veil is lifted and a wash of understanding pours over you from time to time.
  22. Martin Strand III

    Martin Strand III New Member

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    It's called growth.

    Aye,
    Marty
  23. Ehouse

    Ehouse Minister of Fire

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    Marty S; is a cold start difficult? I assume there is a damper to keep heat in the stove after the fire is out that must be opened for a new load to catch.

    Ehouse
  24. firecracker_77

    firecracker_77 Minister of Fire

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    I think those stoves have a damper on the chimney to trap the heat after firing and an air control for start-up. I spent a few hours yesterday reading about these.
  25. Martin Strand III

    Martin Strand III New Member

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    These things have no air inlet control. It's always full bore "ON"
    which is what it needs to burn fast, hot and clean. This may be a
    scary concept to a metal stove burner. Air inlet size is engineered
    into it to be a "no brainer" to achieve the planned hot burn
    (stoichiometric air plus just a little more but not too much).

    These things do have a damper. The choice is either near the top
    of the chimney with a "pull" cord or at the base of the chimney with
    a manual lever. I have the latter which traps warm air in the unit
    after the coals are out. The former traps warm air in the unit and
    the chimney. Both are opened on starting another fire. Either type
    can be used to "cool" down the heater somewhat when desired, as
    in the off season, by leaving them open after the coals are out.

    Cold starts are never difficult with dry wood. You get almost
    immediate radiant heat thru the glass. So hot standing close
    will singe your short ones. The masonry takes more time to
    warm up to 170* F or so (never more)depending on the fuel load.

    Aye,
    Marty
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