MC a little suprised

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by gzecc, Oct 16, 2009.

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  1. gzecc

    gzecc
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    Went out to check the moisture content of my assorted piles today. Was surprised to find that some white oak split branches are still above 25% after two summers. I am also surprised to see some black walnut that was cut, split and cross stacked in march is still >25%. Black locust and white ash that I also processed in march are both around 20%.
    I was hoping to use the oak this year, hopefully next. I'm sure my stacking locations could be better. Everything is off the ground and loosly stacked, but most is under shade.
     
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  2. kenny chaos

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    Two summers? Throw away the moisture meter and get to burnin'.
     
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  3. smokinj

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    +1 go with what you know!
     
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  4. gzecc

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    I burn the driest and highest btu's first. The oak can wait.
     
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  5. crazy_dan

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    I burn the highest BTUs when it is COLD not chilly outside.
    If it has been C/S/S for 2 years it is good to go.
    but if you got enough wood another year on it will not hurt it either.
    I would be tempted to toss some in the stove to see how it does.
     
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  6. blades

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    Isn't White oak more or less self sealing? They make vats for various beverages and other assorted things from that for just that reason I believe.
     
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  7. Backwoods Savage

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    With all due respect fellas, many times oak will take 3 years to season. I've had some that wasn't ready to burn even after 3 years and it was stacked in the sun and wind. You just can't make blanket statements and expect it to be true always.

    For example, I've written on here before about white ash. As most know, ash is very low moisture content and in a real pinch can be burned green although that certainly should not be done if an alternative is available. But at the same time, occasionally one will find a white ash that just don't burn worth squat. I had one that had seasoned for 3 years and still didn't burn good. Sometimes it just happens and I have no idea why; I just accept it.

    If that were my oak, it would sit for another year without and hesitation. I like my wood to be dry.

    Okay. Carry on.
     
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  8. crazy_dan

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    I have never had any wood take longer than 1 summer cut split and stacked where it has air flow and sun.
    but that is my experience and we have long hot summers and I almost always have a breeze.
     
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  9. Tony H

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    When in doubt about MC I just fire up a few logs in the fireplace and see how it goes. Works much better than going in the boiler because I can see and hear it in the FP. If it's still slightly wet but it's high BTU stuff and I want to use a little for long burns when it's really cold I throw some in on top of the load so it gets some drying time in the boiler and that seems to work fine.
    Seems like most of the non oak stuff I get here is ready to go with 9 to 12 months seasoning .
     
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  10. Rockey

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    Couldn't agree more. I have been burning red/white oak for the past five years and this is the first time I let the oak dry for 2 consecutive summers and it is still sizzling and hissing after being in the stove for an hour. It was a crappy summer for seasoning here and these splits were from the center of a big stack. The pieces that were on the top were seasoned until all the rain lately soaked back in.
     
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  11. Duetech

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    The ash and black locust sound the like wood to use winter if you have enough for the season. If you have white ash it will probably be all you "need" and the black locust can be used for your "all night" fuel supply. Black or green ash are in the same ball park as black walnut btu wiseand I have successfully used black walnuteven in the hard part of winter but with more frequent stove loadings (mine had a two year in the sun cure and some was still not "ideal"). A resplit of the white oak will help in seasoning and a few pieces thrown in with the locust you have will help to strectch your quantity of locust in the heart of winter (just watch for creosote). The root problem though seems to be the shade over the wood stack. Shady areas tend to hold ground moisture longer vs sunny areas so you may want to rethink the wood pile location or visit some judicious pruning of your shade trees.
     
  12. ccwhite

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    I'm not as picky as some ..... I would burn it. Then again I don't even own a moisture meter.
     
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  13. Bone1099

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    If one summer isn't enough i would burn it to get it out of the shed sometin' else maybe a little better could take it's place
     
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  14. DaveBP

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    At least here in the Northeast states this has been one of the rainiest summers in memory. Lot of people disappointed in how not dry their firewood is.

    Maybe more folks will cover the top of their split stacks on the chance that it will rain a lot more than they think it will.

    Driven by a lot of firewood stacks that look more like mushroom farms this year.
     
  15. ChrisNJ

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    I agree, hellatious amount of shrooms sprouting on some of my wood :-(
     
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  16. LLigetfa

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    I'm seeing a few black mold spots on some of my wood that's been in my woodshed for 2 years. The white vinyl siding on the North side of my house has black mold spots too and the wife's complaining about the mold affecting her allergies.
     
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