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Moveable roof for top covering wood

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by Mikel Ward, Jul 27, 2013.

  1. Mikel Ward

    Mikel Ward Member

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    Thanks to this forum and the great info shared, I've got a lot of wood stacked up and am trying to handle as little as possible.
    I've top covered with tarps for years ( made from old pool covers). Plywood and some metal roofing were the best to use.
    I recently went by a hot tub store and saw they put some 7'x8' skids by the curb.
    Good raw materials for something I thought. Well I picked up a bunch of the skids and this is what I ended up doing with two of them
    Added two 4x8 sheets of plywood to the top. Then took 3 sections of metal roofing and added it to the top.
    I made 2 of these. Then used the tractor to place on top of stacks

    ws1.jpg ws2.jpg

    ws3.jpg ws4.jpg


    ws5.jpg ws6.jpg

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  2. Woody Stover

    Woody Stover Minister of Fire

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    Nice! :cool: Before I can do that, though, I guess I'll need to get a tractor. ;)
    Paulywalnut, HDRock and Shane N like this.
  3. bmblank

    bmblank Minister of Fire

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    I was planning on doing the same, only 2 stacks wide. I have some pallets from my siding that would work perfect.
  4. Mikel Ward

    Mikel Ward Member

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    I temporarily put the new covers on wood split this year.
    I'll move it to 4 year old red oak stacks that is for this winter but I have to prepare those stacks for the new roof

    I now use skid bookends and stack loose wood between them.
    They act like the sides of a shed will be supports for two 20 foot 4x6 beams that I make up to support roof.
    I will support this in the center to help hold snow load in winter.
    ws7.jpg ws8.jpg


    Top view of wood split this spring.
    In the upper part of pic you can see one of the hot tub skid roofs

    ws9.jpg
    ScotO likes this.
  5. gzecc

    gzecc Minister of Fire

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    Probably best to anchor them to the ground so they don't become frisbees in a wind storm.
    Shane N and PapaDave like this.
  6. PapaDave

    PapaDave Minister of Fire

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  7. Mikel Ward

    Mikel Ward Member

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    Good point I will use Ratcheting Tie Downs to secure the roof to the pallet under the wood.
    The whole idea is portability to be able to easily move the whole thing from year to year.
    ScotO likes this.
  8. rideau

    rideau Minister of Fire

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    As well as those tie downs, I'd have the support posts different lengths back to front, install the roof at an angle to get more wind on the stacks, better snow removal; I'd have some good eyes on the posts and attach the roof there as well. I've seen plywood picked up by hurricane winds, even with heavy wood weighing it down. Have some metal roofing available to me that I was just going to screw into the top layer of wood, with front row stacked a round higher than back row. I may fasten it to plywood first....heavier for one person to move is the negative. Positive greater wear/strength and alternative methods of attaching to pile...hmmm.

    I haven't a tractor, so have to be mindful of weight of covers. Also would have no way of getting a 7 x 8 foot skid home:oops:.
  9. Mikel Ward

    Mikel Ward Member

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    I have used metal roofing screwed directly to plywood and it works well. That's partly whe I've gone to the larger skids.
    I am very mindful of winds and snow. I live on Long Island and last year we experienced both hurricane Sandy and a 30 snowfall
    I am very lucky to have a tractor to help me manage my wood. I'm 62 and the tractor is basically my work crew

    I will have plenty of support for roof and the tie downs will go from the upper skid to the skids under the wood, clamping the roof to the 4x6 beams it sits on. Some metal brackets and screws fixing it to the beam would also be an idea. The wood I'll be covering is already aged 4 years so I'm mostly interested in keeping rain and snow off.

    Thanks
  10. bogydave

    bogydave Minister of Fire

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    Good ideas. Have thought about something similar for the uncovered seasoning stacks
    thru summer to keep the rain off.

    Add a few legs & you're getting close to having a "wood port"

    I built a "wood port" (8' X 48' ) (no tractor)
    After a year out, uncovered, I move the wood under it .

    DSCF0034.JPG
  11. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    Mikel, I'm wondering if you could have gotten by with just screwing the roofing to the pallet? You surely have a good idea and I also like your idea of the ratchet straps.
    ScotO likes this.
  12. maple1

    maple1 Minister of Fire

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    I thought I replied to this earlier, but don't see it - must have forgotten to hit the post button.

    To make real good use of your FEL, I would try loading pallets right from my splitter, then move the pallets where you need them to go. That could be out in the open at first, then under some more permanent cover when dry season ends or it gets close to burning season.

    I load on pallets right from my splitter - next time I touch the wood is to put it in my boiler & burn it.
  13. Shane N

    Shane N Feeling the Heat

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    Really good idea overall. For the OCD in me, I'd put a few more splits in there to level it out so it isn't so warped. Possibly making it slope to one side more too. ;)
    ScotO likes this.
  14. Mikel Ward

    Mikel Ward Member

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    i was going to do that but the thin oak strapping going across the rails was only 1/4 to 3/8 and I was afraid of wrecking the pallet and metal roofing when lifting with forks
    so I added plywood
    Backwoods Savage likes this.
  15. Mikel Ward

    Mikel Ward Member

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    ws9.jpg

    I do this all the time. but I want to stack higher at least 6' all I can lift is 1 pallet 4' high of green red oak. I also don't have the room. after I fill my 20 pallets
    I use the last 1 to move wood from splitting area to stack. then reuse it.
    I must have over 20 cords of wood back there

    I was looking at what others on the forum were doing with firewood and did not see any racks made this way. The stone quarries use a similar setup, although it's smaller to handle large flat stone. I thought I'd modify it for firewood. Just add a couple of 2x4's to a standard pallet. Cut some slots for uprights and you're done. I figure each pallet holds about 1/3 cord of wood. They come apart for storage and are mostly free.
    Thought someone else might use them too!


    ws7.jpg ws6.jpg
    ws8.jpg
  16. MasterMech

    MasterMech Guest

    I'm going to have to check the equipment yard in the morning. I think Mike stole our tractor! (Golf course has the same model with the same tires. But Mike has pallet forks for his!)
    HDRock likes this.
  17. Paulywalnut

    Paulywalnut Minister of Fire

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    Wow. That's nice. Looks like a Cord house!
  18. maple1

    maple1 Minister of Fire

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    Ha - those look a lot like mine. I've just never bothered taking any pics.

    I built mine a bit different so I could get under the sides or the ends. I also tie wire (currently using old clothesline) between the uprights/sides about 2/3 up or so - by the time the pallet is full it's pretty solid with the wire buried in the pile.

    Pallets like that are great - load them up, fire off them, then fold them up & pile out of the way until you're ready to load up again. A pallet jack makes things even better, if you've got the surface for it.
  19. Mikel Ward

    Mikel Ward Member

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    I started using wire also but put it at the top. Two strands across each upright 2x4. I use black chain link wire.
    It keeps everything nice and tidy. I also make skids that are 30 inches high. I can lift these up and put them on top of the full skid. then fill in loose split wood in between the bookends. and now I have a portable roof I can place on top!

    The pallets are great but I'm at least 5 years ahead on wood and I do not want them sitting for that long that's why I started filling in-between them with wood. I have 20 of them and they've held up great - 5 years now and i've had very little rot or damage to them
    heres a few more pics
    photo 3.JPG photo 2.JPG photo.JPG
    ScotO and Backwoods Savage like this.
  20. ScotO

    ScotO Guest

    Very nice setup, Mike. Also, great idea on the moveable roof, and the ratchet straps to hold it down. I really like it!
  21. bogydave

    bogydave Minister of Fire

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    The more pictures you post,
    the better & better your stacks look.
    Really nice neat & organized. :)
  22. Mikel Ward

    Mikel Ward Member

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    Thanks
    The pic to the right of my tractor was in early spring and that stack wasn't done
    This is how that section of wood ended up. All spring split except the 5 pallets in front thats 5 yr old red oak

    ws81.JPG
    Bluezx636 likes this.
  23. bogydave

    bogydave Minister of Fire

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    That's just AWESOME!
    Serious amount of BTUS there :)
    How tall is the ladder?
  24. Mikel Ward

    Mikel Ward Member

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    6 foot stepladder
    I just got another 2 truckloads of wood but I'll wait until spring to process it.
    i have to burn some to make room.
    I do have to get it stacked off the ground though
    The wood shown being dumped has been split and is in the stacks above.
    I just wanted to show the truck the wood comes in.

    tw1.jpg tw2.jpg
    tw3.jpg
    MasterMech likes this.
  25. bogydave

    bogydave Minister of Fire

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    Quit the set up.
    Very nice :)

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