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Moving an Englander NC30

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by jreed, Apr 8, 2013.

  1. jreed

    jreed Member

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2010
    Messages:
    59
    Loc:
    MD
    This weekend I am considering going and picking up an NC30. Im hoping that I can I can talk home depot down in price a little.

    Anyways, my question is about moving the stove. I see the weight is about 400 pounds altogether. Im guessing this is the crated weight with the legs/pedestal, etc? I will need to unload it from my truck (small dodge dakota) and move it probably 30 feet into my house. Im wondering how everyone else goes about moving theirs? Is it bet to disassemble as much as possible before moving it? What does the weight end up being in the end and how many men should i need to help?

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  2. stoveguy2esw

    stoveguy2esw Minister of Fire

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    madison hgts. va
    first thing would be to take the "loose components" out, remove the bricks and if you wish, you can remove the door as well (be careful with the glass) this should drop the weight of the hull by a good 75 lbs or so. even still the hull is going to be a bit north of 300 lbs so a couple good sized fellows to help would probabaly be a good idea.
  3. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

    Joined:
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    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    With crate that will be closer to 500#. Have 3 additional strong bodies on hand (no beer until the stove is in place). When moving the 600# T6 I fabricated some ramps to slide the stove from the pickup down to ground level. Then I put a blanket over the stove and ratchet strapped the stove and pallet base to a heavy duty appliance dolly. That made the stove and dolly one unit. With wheels it was pretty easy to roll down to the house. We only had a couple low steps to to lift it up, then roll right over to the hearth. Unstrap the stove, remove blanket, unbolt the stove from pallet. Then with one man per corner we did a quick lift into position. The whole operation took less than 30 minutes.
    stoveguy2esw likes this.
  4. tekguy

    tekguy Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2009
    Messages:
    335
    Loc:
    west mass
    i had a similarly weighted stove to move, had it delivered to work at loading dock, showed up on a day I was driving minivan, so I just removed seats and had them stick it in with fork truck, when I got home i used a little creativity - I pulled right up to front door, using the following setup I got it right to top step and lowered it onto a moving dolly on my own (its all screwed together with 3" screws and worked fine)
    [​IMG]
  5. Dieselbreath

    Dieselbreath Member

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2009
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    104
    Loc:
    Oregon
    Doesn't Home Depot deliver? If they sent a couple guys you might slip them an extra $50 to have them set it inside for you.
  6. wingsfan

    wingsfan Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2008
    Messages:
    359
    Loc:
    Jackson,Mi.
    I took the loose stuff out and the fire brick, then took the door off. Then with the help of on person was able to maneuver it around to a cart I have on wheels..With the cart I was able to move it to where I needed it, then the two of us set it in it's final resting place on the hearth.
  7. StihlHead

    StihlHead Guest

    I bought mine last year from a HD in Virginia when they had free shipping and a $650 price tag at some stores online. It took three of us large guys to get it out of the moving van, up a flight of 6 stairs, into the living room and set down on its shipping pallet next to the hearth. That was using a heavy duty steel moving dolly on 4 wheels, and a ramp I made out of plywood (to get it up the stairs).

    To lighten the load, pull the cardboard box off and then remove the glass door and bricks, and the fan and legs that are in a box inside. It comes attached to the pedestal, which is bolted to the pallet at the factory. It is more manageable that way.
  8. BobUrban

    BobUrban Minister of Fire

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    Central Michigan
    Get help!! If at all possible go from the truck into the house with a ramp. I did this and it saved the down/up steps of truck to earth to house. I lucked out and had the help of two very large dudes move it into my living room for $50.00 bones but I moved it solo to the hearh after I removed the old stove. A little savvy thinking and it went just fine. Had I needed to go up anymore than the one brick layer of the hearth I would have needed help for sure.
  9. Hogwildz

    Hogwildz Minister of Fire

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    6,848
    Loc:
    Next to nuke plant Berwick, PA.
    Moving Dolly does wonders once off the truck. Can be had for about 20-25 bucks at Lowes or HD
  10. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    Feb 14, 2007
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    27,816
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    Michigan
    When we got home I slid it off the trailer alone and onto the furniture dolly. Then I ratchet strapped it twice. Going up the stairs we had 2 guys. One pushing and one pulling while I guided it so it would not go off the 2 x 10's that we laid down. Once up there it was easy going.


    We did not take the stove out of the crate until it was right at the hearth. Then we removed the firebox door, firebrick and the top lid. The stove itself was 500 lbs and it moved much easier than we thought.

    Furniture dolly.jpg
  11. EatenByLimestone

    EatenByLimestone Minister of Fire

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    4,846
    Loc:
    Schenectady, NY
    I backed the truck as close as I could and then 3 guys were able to get it down into the basement.

    Matt

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