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Napoleon 1400 question

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by drhiii, Oct 21, 2006.

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  1. drhiii

    drhiii Member

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    I love this stove. Installation was easy. Have been using it for approx 10 days and have acquired some simple yet effective techniques that have provided great, even, easily controllable heat across a range of needs. Cleaning is easy (unlike my prior stove which had me gnashing my teeth every 2 or three days), and it is just a pleasure. Tho we have only gone into the 20s which around here is moderate if not balmy, I can already see how this stove will exceed my needs for this 100 year old, 1800sq ft, reasonably but by no means perfectly insulated home.

    Have only one question. Should the ceiling baffles in the firebox be all the way back allowing gases to exit the front of the stove, or should these baffles be all the way forward allowing gases to exit in the rear. The re is about a 2-3 inch gap where gases exit, and the flue is at the rear. I can experiment, but thought to ask this saged group. It seems to me with baffles back, gases exiting forward, the air flow cascades down the front of the glass keeping it clean, roll along the bottom and up the back to exit in a big circle back at the front. If the baffles are forward, the exit will be at the back of the firebox which is almost directly into the flue. Will call the company of course, but thought to ask advice here.

    tx all

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  2. junksta

    junksta New Member

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    I have the 1400 pedestal and mine are all the way back. I never questioned it because this is the way they were installed originally by the stove company. We are in N. Arizona and have not got the white stuff yet, but I see you guys are getting a pretty good winter already. The stove is great.
  3. drhiii

    drhiii Member

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    Tx for the swift response. Yes, mine are all the way back too. I installed them myself and they may only fit in one way, meaning they cannot be moved forward. Just felt I would ask since from the looks of it, being placed to the front might be possible. Just didn't know which was the optimal configuration... it may only be the way they went in. Just didn't recall if they were able to slide back and forth. Stove runs great the way it is, which is your configuration too. And yes, it is a great stove....

    tx



  4. Roospike

    Roospike New Member

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    I would think only one way to be set . Your baffle should hook to an air inlet from the back of your stove ( at least most do ) unless its hook by way of a flex pipe tho i dont see that happening.
  5. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    I think he is talking about the ceramic baffle elements Spike. Not the secondary burn tubes. Not everybody has that fancy stainless steel box "floating" up top.
  6. Roospike

    Roospike New Member

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    I'm glad i had u to hold my hand because it looks like it went over my head. I wasnt even thinking the ceramic baffle moving front to back to allow air out the back or to the front. :roll:

    Nebraska lost to Texas today ...........I'm just a simple man ya know , one can only take so much before the pressure builds. :grrr:
  7. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    "I’m glade i had u to hold my hand....

    Please burn the prints and the negatives. If digital, format.
  8. Roospike

    Roospike New Member

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    ************* :lol: ****************
  9. Greg123

    Greg123 New Member

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    I have the Napoleon 1100 (Exact same design as the 1400) the ceiling baffles should be towards the back of the stove, they have a tendency to move forward every so often, I check them occationally and push them back if needed.

    The Napoleon is a great stove, they are easy to use. Enjoy the warmth.
  10. drhiii

    drhiii Member

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    Tx all for your replies. I was able to validate through some schematics that the ceramic baffles do indeed fit into the back of the firebox. Everyone here is corroborating that. Cool. I couldn't recall if there was play in them when I placed them in or not and as there is a fire going in it now, I didn't want to start wrestling with them to experiment. To the back is the answer....

    What was mightly pleasurable was placing a single 1/2 log in the box, leaving for several hours, the temp dropped quite a bit, but we came back to a still warm house. It doesn't get any better than that. Pretty impressed with this unit.

    Tx all for your comments.

    drh
  11. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    keep us posted drh and put some pictures on the pictures section. We want to see the beauty.
  12. drhiii

    drhiii Member

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    Will do. Am a photographer among other things... so will grab some captures of the stove. I know it is not as energy efficient or as touted as other stoves, being more of an entry level unit, but have to admit I am getting a kick out of just learning and tending to it. Want to also learn a bit more about various kinds of wood. The most available wood to me right now is cottonwood which is a bit more ash-y than other types. But once it gets going, it burns nicely. It is just damn nice to have this pleasant warmth wrap around the house. Had to run forced air for a couple of weeks while removing the old stove and installing this one... yuk. I enjoy reading about everyone's experiences with their stoves and associated stuff too.

    Anywayz... will post a pic or two....


  13. Roospike

    Roospike New Member

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    WOOD BTU HEAT CHART>

    http://chimneysweeponline.com/howood.htm
  14. drhiii

    drhiii Member

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    Holy cow. This is a great chart, and it also broke my heart. Cottonwood is at the bottom of the chart. There is so much of it around here, along the creek and river beds, it is the easiest to harvest. But dang... this chart is revealing to say the least. Pine and elm are the next available types around here. Looks like I have my work cut out for me now....

    drh



  15. Roospike

    Roospike New Member

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    Whats your location ? Around here in the Mid-West there is a lot of cotton wood , most people dont touch it , it grows until it dies and then rots.

    I cut my share of cottonwood for urban take out and it cut like hard wood , it was heavy but after 1 year to be seasoned it was light and burn fast and had a lot of ash . I only kept about 2 dozen 18" logs for camp fire wood. When i get paid to take out trees and when i come across a cotton wood we take it and dump it off at the lakes and RV parks for camp fire wood.
    I hate to see wood go to the dump .

    drl , go with ELM its a low hard wood and burns great but is a PITA to split .
  16. drhiii

    drhiii Member

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    Am in Colorado Springs, CO. Cottonwoods are plentiful along the creeks, but as you say, they are not top shelf. We have hard wood trees like, elm, but they are less available. We had a terrible fire in the mountains 4 years ago and there is a ton of pine to be harvested from the burn area. I will probably go chase after some of that stuff. My next bet is to work with a couple of local tree cutting outfits that have contracts with the city to remove trees, and this is where better wood can come from...

    I am learning. Just a shame to learn that cottonwood is so dismal. There is so much of it around here, sigh. Now, I do have access to pinyon down south. A bit of a drive, but that stuff is terrific. Was able to burn some in the old stove last winter and it produced some excellent heat in a crummy stove.

    tx for your response, drh



  17. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Elm, eh? Ask Warren... I think you still have your work cut out for you :)
  18. drhiii

    drhiii Member

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    I definitely have no problem cutting firewood. Cleared forests to make money for college, but was not so focused on the firewood aspect. Learning curve now.

    WHo is Warren?



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