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Need Advise after Chimney Fire...

Post in 'The Boiler Room - Wood Boilers and Furnaces' started by jodebg, Jun 9, 2014.

  1. jodebg

    jodebg New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2013
    Messages:
    2
    Last Thursday we had a chimney fire.

    Looks like its time to line the chimney. We operate a 1984 Stadler
    Wood Boiler with a built in thermostatic control on this flu.

    Looking at SS liners as well as a poured in Supaflu liner.

    No experience with either and would like to know the benefits and
    drawbacks to both types of liners.

    Does the creosote stick to the poured in the Supaflu liner like my old flu tiles
    making it nearly impossible to fully clean this style flu?

    I have been told that the creosote does not adhere to the SS liner and is very easy to clean.

    One company suggested an oval SS liner due to the fact that our flu was built with a bend around the
    fireplace. We have a central fireplace/chimney with 4 flues and 2 fireplaces. Approximately 30 foot run.

    Our question is how easy is the oval SS liner going to be to clean and if there a special brush for the oval pipe?

    What is the best brand and quality of SS liners? I was told the HomeSaver Brand is the best and that their
    Pro line is superior to their UltraPro line?

    Is Supaflu the best brand of poured in liner?

    Does the poured in liner hold up..cracking, deterioration, etc.?

    All feedback will be appreciated/thanks.

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  2. chimneylinerjames

    chimneylinerjames Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2012
    Messages:
    381
    One main advantage of the SS liner, is you can install it yourself, saving you hundreds.

    What is the size of the flue outlet on the boiler and the inside measurements of the flue you want to line?
  3. jodebg

    jodebg New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2013
    Messages:
    2
    6" on boiler and 8" x 12" chimney flu
  4. chimneylinerjames

    chimneylinerjames Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2012
    Messages:
    381
    What is the height of the chimney? You could very well use a 5.5" liner. With a taller chimney many people say the 5.5" liner drafts better than a 6". This way you could stay with a round liner and it might fit with insulation.

    Could you get the exact inside measurements of the flue? If it wont fit, yes you could get and oval liner to fit easily with insulation.
  5. heaterman

    heaterman Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2007
    Messages:
    3,078
    Loc:
    Falmouth, Michigan
    We've used products from this company for years. Their "ForeverFlex" liner is the best I've found and they have all the accessories to go along with the liner including insulation. Made in both 316Ti and AL29-4C alloys which are bullet proof
    I do not know if they will sell direct to you or if you have to go through a heating professional to get it
    http://www.olympiachimney.com/
  6. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    29,105
    Loc:
    Northern Virginia
    Use whatever liner you want. If you don't quit burning that green/wet wood in the thing you will still have chimney fires. The answer to not having creosote stick to the chimney walls/liner is burn dry wood hot. And not make the stuff.

    Argue all you want. You just had the proof happen.
    sloeffle and Fred61 like this.
  7. maple1

    maple1 Minister of Fire

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    Sep 15, 2011
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    4,117
    Loc:
    Nova Scotia
    I get your point, but creosote can happen from dry wood too. I know, I burned dry wood for 17 years and had to sweep my chimney 4 times a year.

    So don't assume someone is burning green/wet wood & condemn them for it if you really don't know for sure - any conventional wood boiler can pump it out easily no matter how dry the wood is.
  8. hobbyheater

    hobbyheater Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2011
    Messages:
    1,006
    I agree with Maple dry wood being (Boiled)not burned when a standard boiler is in standby idle mode can generate a lot of bad stuff in the chimney .Had one of these in the late 70's it required weekly chimney fires to keep the flue clean ,as the ooze in the chimney would just turn a flue brush into a ball of tar .

    For the question on the liner I have no advice .If you want to get away from chimney fires go with gasification with storage . With a gasification boiler and storage I can go years between cleanings!

    Months after a cleaning.
    IMGP4409.JPG
  9. heaterman

    heaterman Minister of Fire

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    Oct 16, 2007
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    3,078
    Loc:
    Falmouth, Michigan
    The equation is as follows

    Properly seasoned wood+gasification = thermal storage=clean burning

    Drop out any segment of that formula and you have a dirty burn or at least less than optimal burn

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