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Need opinion- flue for Harman Mark III coal stove

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by firemarshallbill, Dec 22, 2005.

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  1. firemarshallbill

    firemarshallbill New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2005
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    Hello everyone - I have a 150 year old home with unlined chimneys; just brick and mortar. I just bought a harman mark 3 coal stove for the basement to help with my heating bill since I payed around 500 a month last year to the gas company during the winter months. My chimney is around 33 feet tall from the basement. I have gotten differing opinions from 2 installers on what I should do to vent the stove. On one quote, the installer said that I should use stainless steel pipe with the wrap insulation and wire mesh up the chimney. The other installer said that using stainless steel pipe for a coal stove is not an ideal situation since it would need to be replaced in around 6 years. I've not heard of this before, but he specializes in relining the chimney by placing a "sock" down the chimney, then pouring some material down the chimney(I don't know what this material is), then removing the sock a couple of days later. He said that my chimney is so big that he has room to put 2 "socks" in there to create 2 flues. He also said that this method will reinforce my chimney since its so old and is a one time deal unlike the stainless steel liner.

    I'm hesitant on getting a stainless steel liner that I will have to replace in 6-7 years, but after reading on some headaches of keeping the coal stove burning, wonder if the stainless steel liner would create a better draft due to its heating up quicker.

    Your help is appreciated.

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  2. joshuaviktor

    joshuaviktor New Member

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    Dec 19, 2005
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    Loc:
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    Sounds like a concrete deal. Interesting. I have a similar problem. 270 year old brick chimneys, unlined. I am putting a wood insert in one, and something else in another, later. I also have 2 fireplaces per chimney. Can I use just single wall black to go up this chimney? One of the chimneys is a triangle about 7 feet on a side, made of solid brick. I want to heat the brick to radiate heat throughout the house. I thought of using single wall pipe with a plate at the top to stabilize the chimney and seal it at the top, and fiberglass at the bottom to seal it at the bottom. This would create a dead air space around the pipe, and heat the brick.

    Just a thought.

    Joshua
  3. webbie

    webbie Seasoned Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
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    If you use rigid stainless and it is 316 ss, chances are it will last a long time.

    But the poured stuff can be good also, since it does reinforce the chimney.

    So either sounds good, and I assume both are fairly expensive!
  4. elkimmeg

    elkimmeg Guest

    "Can I use just single wall black to go up this chimney? One of the chimneys is a triangle about 7 feet on a side, made of solid brick. I want to heat the brick to radiate heat throughout the house. I thought of using single wall pipe with a plate at the top to stabilize the chimney and seal it at the top, and fiberglass at the bottom to seal it at the bottom. This would create a dead air space around the pipe, and heat the brick."

    Wrong wrong wrong Single wall black connector pipe is just that a connector pipe not a chimney. There is not a code offical worth their salt that would pass such an installation. The fiberglass on the bottom? Tell me how it is ridged and Can resist backdraft from wind or chimney fire. What part of code did you get the fiberglass usage from. Can't be done

    Maybe not the most tackfull approach, but I'll take thanks after your first chimney fire, that is If you are still amongst the living. That black wall pipe is not designed to stand up to the intense heat of a chimney fire It will blow through and nothing not the fiber glass at the bottom will save your home. The other thing single wall pipe will dissipate heat to your bricks, but as it is doing so, the rapid heat loss causes condenstaion and rapid cresote build up, making the chimney fire inevitable or sooner. Hate my lack of tack, but I may have just saved your home, life, and your famillies'. It's not good enough to have one Merry Christmas. The goal here is to have many And it is not a good plan Use stainless steel HT 2100 approved for the liner and a solid Metal damper block off plate
  5. BS-N

    BS-N New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2005
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    Loc:
    Northeastern Pennsylvania
    LOL. Calm down. He phrased it as a question. It wasn't advice.
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