1. Welcome Hearth.com Guests and Visitors - Please enjoy our forums!
    Hearth.com GOLD Sponsors who help bring the site content to you:
    Hearthstone Soapstone and Cast-Iron stoves( Wood, Gas or Pellet Stoves and Inserts)
    Caluwe - Passion for Fire and Water ( Pellet and Wood Hydronic and Space Heating)
  1. Free diver

    Free diver New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2012
    Messages:
    3
    . This site is a wealth of knowledge and I'm hoping to get some direction. I bought a new home in mass and it has an older energy harvester wood stove in the lower level. It was made in New Hampshire and is rated at 35,000 btu. I painted it, replaced the gaskets and sealed the seams. The duct is five inch and connected to a 5 in stainless liner that exits the 24 ft Chimmney. The draft is ok, not great. I have a ton of red oak from my land that I'm burning with is a mix of dry and green stuff. The problem I'm having is low heat. With the damper fully open stove gets up to 400 ish degrees but eats a full load in about 3 hours. If I choke it down it will only burn at around 250 degrees which is too low. Any ideas to improve this situation?

    Thanks matt

    en havester.jpg

    Helpful Sponsor Ads!





  2. webbie

    webbie Seasoned Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2005
    Messages:
    12,109
    Loc:
    Western Mass.
    Great stove.
    I think your problem is partially related to the mix - of green wood! Green or even unseasoned (partially seasoned) or wet wood uses a lot of the energy to burn off the water. So the wood burns, but most of the energy is used in creating steam which goes out the chimney.

    My guess is that your draft is adequate or you would not even be able to make the unseasoned wood burn.

    The real test would be to get some of the best pieces you have - hopefully nice and grey with the bark having fell off, and firing it up with 100% of the driest wood you have. Every wood burner should have a moisture meter to check their stock....

    Also, make sure you are using the stove in the correct front to back burning fashion.
    See:
    http://www.hearth.com/talk/threads/what-is-a-cigar-burn.81057/
    http://www.hearth.com/econtent/index.php/articles/tending_a_wood_fire
    (type 2)
  3. Free diver

    Free diver New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2012
    Messages:
    3
    I have quite a few large dead red oaks still standing in my yard. Probably have been dead 5 years or so. The outside inch or so is kinda punky, but the inside is perfect. I cut them down and split them about a month ago and stacked and covered about 5 cords. I guess I have to break down and buy some dryer wood. Thanks for the cigar burn info. Such a simple technique I never would have thought of doing. I'll order a moister meter too. Thanks for the reply!
  4. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    44,510
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    Definitely sounds like the wood. Stop at the local store an pick up a bundle of dry wood and try it out.

    I'm concerned about this installation. It looks like the stove is right up against the brick and does not have adequate hearth protection. This is a serious safety issue, especially if there is wood studding on the backside of that brick. I believe it is required to be at least 24" from the brick unless there is a label on the stove showing closer clearances.

    PS: I rotated your picture so that the stove is upright.
  5. Free diver

    Free diver New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2012
    Messages:
    3
    I live on Martha's Vineyard and codes are overlooked to say the least. The back of the door indicates 36in clearance to combustibles. I'll extend the elbow and pull it out away from the wall. I have a jotul 606 upstairs and that installation is really scary! I struck out on a web search for a manual for the energy harvester. It has an upper and lower damper on the door and I was wondering if there was any technique for better burn. A cord of wood out here is 350 bucks, but its jan already and I haven't turned the boiler on once! Can't describe how satisfying that is! Thanks for turning the pic, my computer was about to take a ride into the woods.
  6. gzecc

    gzecc Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2008
    Messages:
    3,634
    Loc:
    NNJ
    Its your fuel. Red oak takes 2 yrs after its stacked and split small to get to good moisture levels (<25%).
  7. remkel

    remkel Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2010
    Messages:
    1,459
    Loc:
    Southwest NH
    +1
  8. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    44,510
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    Your stove requires 36" from combustibles, but the full brick wall behind it reduces that requirement by a third to 24". Pay attention to these requirements. Ignoring them can have dire consequences that may not show up for a year or 5, but when they do they can be disastrous. Here are a couple shots illustrating what happens with inadequate hearth protection. The home owners thought everything was fine until their inadequate protector was removed to reveal what was underneath. Get the 606 taken care of too. The life you save may be your own.

    burnt floor.jpg BurntFloor.JPG

    PS, don't forget to replace your avatar image. The stove is still snoozing on its side.
    harryfatcat likes this.

Share This Page