1. Welcome Hearth.com Guests and Visitors - Please enjoy our forums!
    Hearth.com GOLD Sponsors who help bring the site content to you:
    Hearthstone Soapstone and Cast-Iron stoves( Wood, Gas or Pellet Stoves and Inserts)
    Caluwe - Passion for Fire and Water ( Pellet and Wood Hydronic and Space Heating)

New here.. starting a new Hearth project..

Post in 'The Pellet Mill - Pellet and Multifuel Stoves' started by dirtmcgirt79, Sep 15, 2008.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. dirtmcgirt79

    dirtmcgirt79 Member

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2008
    Messages:
    11
    Loc:
    VA
    Hello everyone.. just wanted to drop by and introduce myself and maybe get a few tips on my upcoming project that's going to start in about a week.

    My wife, daughter, and our St Bernard live in the mountains of Virginia in a ski resort setting.. Our home is about 2700sqft, 1 1/2 stories with a full walkout basement.
    Currently our sources of heat are a heat pump, and a small wood-burning fireplace on the first level.. Let's just say that we rarely have had electric bills below $250 a month in the winter months, and we burn a cord or so of firewood as well in the fireplace. The basement is currently unfinished, and without any insulation stays pretty cold. Very inefficient to say the least.

    So my project for the next few months is to make the house a little more energy efficient and lower some of those heating bills. So we have decided to finish the basement and put a small pellet stove in one of the corners that is above the ground. I have never built a hearth before, but am pretty experienced with most aspects of construction. The floor in the basement is just a concrete at this point, and will be covered in hardwood. But my thoughts on the hearth were to just use metal studs to frame up the base, with 2 layers of duroc on top, thinset in between; then lay cultured stone on top of that. For the walls, I was going to duroc a 3 foot wide section out from the corner in each direction, and then just thinset and cultured stone the walls to the ceiling as well. (Our fireplace upstairs was done in stone, and we really want to keep it looking similar). Would this work? Would it be efficient? And what kind of mortar should be used to lay the stone and fill the gaps? Also, is cultured stone ok to use on the base?

    My stove requirements do not include any R-values at all, and require 6 inches from the front of the stove to a combustible material. The stove piping will be vertical inside a few feet, then go horizontal out the wall.. (we have pretty strict requirements on external pipes and such on the house).

    Anyhow thanks for the great forum so far.. I'm enjoying reading through all of the posts about building a hearth, and I think it's going to be a fun project..

    Helpful Sponsor Ads!





  2. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    48,334
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    Great to hear that you are putting effort into improving the house's energy efficiency. The more you improve here, the more it will pay back regardless of heat source.

    Most pellet stoves have minor hearth requirements. If on a concrete slab, there is no improvement required. Maybe consider using a thicker tile for the hearth on the concrete to match the hardwood floor height? That would save a little and be very effective.
  3. dirtmcgirt79

    dirtmcgirt79 Member

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2008
    Messages:
    11
    Loc:
    VA
    So really I don't need to frame up at all? I would like a little thickness to the base, to make it look noticeably higher than the hardwood.. so just adding a couple layers of Duroc on top of the concrete slab would work? I'm thinking of using a flagstone base, so it really won't be tile, but should be a relatively flat surface..
  4. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    48,334
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    Yes, sounds like an entirely non-combustible hearth to me. You could put any wood stove on that. Use some thinset between the layers to bond them together.
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page