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New installation

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by Techone, Nov 28, 2012.

  1. Techone

    Techone New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2012
    Messages:
    7
    Hello how is everyone. I am new to these forums.

    I just finished installing a Drolet Celtic woodstove in an outside corner of my house.

    I used all Supervent products, single wall stovepipe 6' to chimney support with attic insulation shield , double wall insulated chimney pipe to rafter radiation shield approx 3' above and out the roof and flashing.

    It is a corner installation, the manufacturer recommended 10" from corner to wall, I left 11.5, 18" in front for hearth pad I left 20. There is 22" from the wall to the single wall stove pipe. The hearth pad is .5" cement board with .5" tile on mortared and grouted on top. There is no wall protector and the wall is made of drywall.

    This is my first woodstove so I guess I am just looking for some peace of mind. I am certain everything is installed correctly I just wonder under what circumstances these stoves are tested and just how hot can I get it really without starting the ceiling joists on fire.

    Thanks for any insight anyone can provide.

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  2. Techone

    Techone New Member

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    Nov 28, 2012
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    I guess after looking through the forums more the information is definitely already out there so dont worry bout answering that question! One other thing I was wondering and haven't been able to find anything about is that I don't have much wood dried but how about a standing dead tree for firewood. I mean all the bark off standing stark dead, how should that work out? Can I drop split and burn it right away?
  3. Eaglecraft

    Eaglecraft Member

    Joined:
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    Loc:
    Eastern Idaho

    Techone:

    Probably would be a good idea to invest in a moisture meter. You would be needing less than 20 percent moisture for a good burn. There are many variables that might affect the moisture content of dead standing trees. To ease your mind, get a meter and measure what you've got...

    I think it was Rodger Bacon who was refused admittance into the Royal Society because he suggested that the best way to determine how many teeth were in a horse's mouth was to open the horse's mouth and count them.

    Good luck...By the way, be very careful felling dead standing trees...

    Eaglecraft
  4. Techone

    Techone New Member

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    Nov 28, 2012
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    Thanks for the advice, I think that I will invest in a moisture meter and probably a stovepipe thermostat too, just to be safe. This stove has been awesome so far, having grown up with an old Ben Franklin style woodstove I am amazed at how efficient these new woodstoves are. I know what you mean about the felling dead trees I have dropped quite a few of them for various reasons and you almost have to cut all the way through the holding wood and then they just snap.
  5. firefighterjake

    firefighterjake Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2008
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    14,968
    Loc:
    Unity/Bangor, Maine
    As mentioned . . . some dead wood is good to go . . . and some needs more time to season . . . it really comes down to the moisture level. In my first year of burning I found some tree tops left behind in the woods that was marginal . . . and I had some standing dead elm that burned pretty well -- or at least the top of the tree did . . . the wood near the trunk was not so good to burn.

    Getting a thermometer will help you a lot in terms of running your woodstove.
  6. Chris 3.0

    Chris 3.0 New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2013
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    Loc:
    Kentucky
    Can I ask how you like your Drolet Celtic? There's not much out there about this model and I am interested in one. I've never seen ANY in home pics of one either. Just to see size wise what it looks like, box size or anything. Kind of in the dark.
    Thanks
  7. Techone

    Techone New Member

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    Nov 28, 2012
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    Keep in mind that this is the first modern woodstove that I have experience with. so i don't have much to compare it to. For my purposes, heating an old house around 1000 sf, it works great. If I pack it full at night I can usually get a fire going in the morning without kindling, although the furnace will kick on before the night is through on really cold nights in Iowa. It looks alright in my opinion, I got it on sale for 350 dollars so there was no shopping around for me. It does like to ping and ting sometimes, but I have learned to recognize the sound as a roaring fire or that the fire needs another log :). All stoves might do that too, I don't really know. The only thing that I wish it had was a removable gas burner. That would make it a LOT easier cleaning out the chimney, since I could just sweep everything directly into the firebox instead of having to take the stove out once a year to clean the vertical flue.​

  8. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    If you have only standing dead wood, consider only burning the top 2/3ds this season and stack the lower 1/3d for next season. For ease of cleaning consider putting in a telescoping section of pipe as a connector.
  9. Chris 3.0

    Chris 3.0 New Member

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    Loc:
    Kentucky
    Where in Gods name did you get it for that price?!? That's the deal of the year!

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