New Jotul F370 Installed

doa2k Posted By doa2k, Mar 6, 2012 at 5:44 PM

  1. doa2k

    doa2k
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    Feb 3, 2012
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    Hi all,

    First off I liked to thank you guys for all the insight you and this forum has provided me as I've finally completed a 4 month project in getting this stove installed in my home. The prep process included stove selection, chimey replacement, hearth selection, wall protection, clearances and installation. We choose the Jotul F370 for aethetic purposes. We love the look and it fits well into our contemporary style. For those who are curious...The Hearth is a custom 1 inch slab of dense granite "black galaxy" all black with a little copper flake. It measures 45" all sides with the front corner snipped off. Its a remnant piece I sourced locally for $550, although they charged me $300 to bring it over and place/level it. Given that it weighs 350 lbs, I didnt have a problem with that. The wall protection are standard UL type II stove boards measuring 48" x 28". I had them framed in brushed black aluminum to give them an artsy finished look. VERY happy with the way they turned out. The boards were about $350 for both and framing was a little over $100. I had the boards minimally sized to allow no part of the stove to be closer than 16" to an unprotected wall as required in the technical manual. The final measurements came out perfect. At full burn the unprotected walls to the sides of the frame get hot, but not hot enough so that you cant keep your hand there (a practical guideline I read somewhere). Now the good stuff...The stove is rated at 35,000 btu's max. This is my first stove so I have nothing to compare it to, but when cranking it kicks out plenty of heat. Our home is approx 1400 sq ft and the area intended to be heated is roughly 900 sq ft with a 19 ft ceiling at its peak. I'm able to raise the thermostat temp 5-7 degrees in about 3 hours and maintain peak temperature without running the stove at full bore. The burning chamber is relatively small accepting logs no longer than 13-14 inches placed teepee style. (3) 4 inch thick pieces placed vertically pretty much fills it. Burn time is quick. New logs need to be added every 2 hours to keep this thing kickin near full strength. They claim 4-6 burn time but after 4 hours you'll have embers on their way out. We dont intend to go 'off the grid' so it doesnt bother me. Its a supplemental heat source and if I can save 25-30% on my oil expenditure, I'll be more than happy. Below are a couple of picks. Thanks again everyone and happy burning!

    F370_1.jpg
    F370_2.jpg
     
    jotulguy and 7acres like this.
  2. begreen

    begreen
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    That looks very spiffy. First posting for this stove I think? You do know that by framing the wall shields in, they are not much different than not being there. Wall shields are supposed to be suspended off the wall with spacers so that there is a 1" air space behind them. They must be open top and bottom for ventilation.
     
  3. joecool85

    joecool85
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    Any pics of it mid-burn? I like the look of it. If it was just a bit bigger I could use it in my house.
     
  4. doa2k

    doa2k
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    Feb 3, 2012
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    I should have clarified. The stove boards are mounted with 1" ceramic spacers and the framing is flush with the back surface of the stoveboards so there is a one inch air gap between any part of the frame and the walls so its up to code. Thanks for the props! The one thing I didn't realize before I had this put in was the wonderful light show you achieve well into a burn lowering the air valve. Its so soothing visually! I love it!
     
  5. begreen

    begreen
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    Sounds good. It's hard to see the gap with black trim on a black panel. Add my vote for some shots of it burning. We like fire!
     
  6. DanCorcoran

    DanCorcoran
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    Those wall boards are a great idea! I don't need them for insulation, but they sure make the corner look better. My cabin has a high ceiling (like yours) and I've been racking my brain as to how I could define the corner. Thanks again!
     
  7. webby3650

    webby3650
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    Looks great! I had suggested using something more contemporary to match the stove, you thought the boards would look great and you were right. Good Job!
     
  8. certified106

    certified106
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    Very cool looking stove! Definitely keep us updated on how you like it. Pics of the stove in full burn would be cool :)
     
  9. Pallet Pete

    Pallet Pete
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    That is a very beautiful stove ! I am curious how it performs. Please keep us posted ?

    Pete
     
  10. jrcurto

    jrcurto
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    Love the cathedral/loft and the stove. I have plans for the same some day with a spiral stair case (maybe a power lift for old age!)
     
  11. PutneyVT

    PutneyVT
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    Aug 4, 2014
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    Jotul F370


    We have an installation that the Jotul F370 looks perfect for…but we cannot find any 1st hand reviews as to its performance. In particular, we would like to know people's experience with having to tilt up the 12" logs, and the time intervals between the need to refill.


    Thanks in advance for any help.
     
  12. Mertz

    Mertz
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    Sep 29, 2016
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    How is your F370 working out? It's on my short list - along with a couple of Morso stoves.

     

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  13. Simonkenton

    Simonkenton
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    That is looking good! Very modern looking wood stove install. I didn't know Jotul made a stove like that.
    Beautiful!
     
  14. revdocjim

    revdocjim
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    It's good to see someone choosing the modern style stoves. My hunch is that the majority of users in North America prefer classic style stoves and the same is true here in Japan where I live. But Europe and Scandinavia seem to be a different story. Anyway, your setup looks great. It should provide many, many hours of warmth and pleasure!
     
  15. begreen

    begreen
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    Many of the modern stoves burn small loads of wood, vertically. They are room heaters mostly designed for when the room is occupied. In the US a larger number of stoves are sold for whole house heating and longer burn times.
     
  16. revdocjim

    revdocjim
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    For sure. But I also sense a difference in aesthetic preferences, with traditionally styled stoves being more popular in North America (and here in Japan) and contemporary styling more popular in Europe and Scandinavia... could be wrong, but it's just a sense I get from looking at catalogs, store inventories and forums like this one.
     
  17. blacktail

    blacktail
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    I have a coworker from Japan. First of all, he's awesome. Second, woodstoves are pretty common around here. One time he was talking about his house and I asked if he had a wood stove. He laughed and said (in a thick accent), "I'm from Japan. We are civilized people. We are not cavemen."
     
  18. revdocjim

    revdocjim
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    I can't say anything specific about your friend, but the difference between city folk and those of us who live in rural areas is probably a common theme just about anywhere. Here in Japan there are very few wood burners in urban or even urban areas. The houses tend to be extremely close to each other and people are extremely sensitive about not bothering their neighbors. Burning your own garbage became a crime a couple decades ago because of air pollution concerns. But once you get into the mountains it is quite common to see newer houses with chimneys. Of course a big cultural difference is that older houses in North America frequently have fireplaces whereas they are extremely rare in Japan. Wood burning as a source of heat went out of fashion in most parts of Japan fifty years ago or more. So modern wood stoves are sort of a new thing here and as such, only tend to get installed in new homes in mountainous areas by people who have the money.
     
  19. blacktail

    blacktail
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    I'm not doubting you. Just sharing. I cracked up at my coworker's near-disgust and heavy accent when I asked about a wood stove. Im pretty sure he was a city dweller most of his life. He's the same guy who asked me why so many people drive pickup trucks.
     
  20. begreen

    begreen
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    Could be right, that certainly is what one sees in catalogs for Germany and Scandinavia. It could be the trend. In my travels to Europe I have seen mostly older, classic stoves, but most of the places I have stayed were older too.
     
  21. begreen

    begreen
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    Ive asked the same question. Out here I see folks driving pickups all the time for just grocery shopping or commuting. The truck may be 7 yrs old and the bed has nary a scratch. Seems to be a western suburban status symbol.
     
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