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New roofing question, comments, discussion about anything thread.

Post in 'DIY and General non-hearth advice' started by Hogwildz, Sep 22, 2007.

  1. Hogwildz

    Hogwildz Minister of Fire

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    Ok guys, post all your roof questions in this thread. It matters not what type of roof, its ok to ask, and answer in here.
    Feel free to talk about any type of roof, ask any type of roof questions, or anything you else you want to.
    Learning about anything you have questions on, is a GOOD thing. So you will not be frowned upon for asking any roof or none roof specific questions in this thread.

    I promise not to get all upset ;) Someone dial WHIIIIIINE 11 AND CALL ME A WHAMMMMMBULANCE ;) MUAHAHAHAHA


    I just got done fixing the flashing around the chimney outside. Seems the previous homeowner did NOT realize that muck (roof cement) was not intended for a permanent solution. Seems he decided not to cut a reglet for the counter flashing around the chimney at the roof line. Well the muck finally let loose and the water from the upper roof dumped off and into the gap between the block & the flashing. Leaking onto my newly installed T&G;pine ceiling. Luckily it stayed at the corner and no stains.
    I temp sealed it with urethane until I get to cutting the reglet.

    Wow, the freedom to talk about what I want........................... I am freeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee :)

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  2. keyman512us

    keyman512us Member

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    Hog...C'mon...lol

    'Karnac' (aka muck...aka 'liquid roofing in a can) Is not a permanent solution??? Say it ain't so! lol ;)

    Nothing like a "big trowel on job" to get a good laugh (but only if it's not your own roof).
  3. njtomatoguy

    njtomatoguy Feeling the Heat

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    previous owners here did the same thing- flat roof has silver coating, but more black goo than silver. I should have been cautious when they left me the bucket in the shed. -

    So - Flat roof over utility/laundry rooms. What is the right way to fix it. More silver ? Rolled roofing? I guess it's flat rolls, but they use a torch. Both neighbor on side of me and behind me had the one that needed a torch.
    Thanks
    Bob
  4. precaud

    precaud Minister of Fire

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    OK, I'll bite. Big roof on the garage/storage building, SBS Brai torchdown, New Mexico climate. Major blisters/wrinkles have developed in areas. I'm cutting them, removing the buckled asphalt layers underneath making it smooth, then cementing it back down. Then I'll coat the whole thing with Henry 107 asphalt emulsion and then white acrylic.

    The quiestion is about the cementing down. When I started, I was 3 coursing using roofing cement (Henry 505). But that stuff has to age 30 days or more before it can be coated. So I tried using the 107 emulsion with polyester mesh. It's dry and ready to coat in less than 2 days. So far I'm impressed.

    Whadya think?
  5. keyman512us

    keyman512us Member

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    The "right way" IMHO would be to "rip it all out", lay down some good A-C rated 1/4"(at least) laun plywood to make a nice flat surface...put new metal drip edge all the way around and lay an 030." EPDM ('rubber') roof...

    What would you say Hog???
  6. keyman512us

    keyman512us Member

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    ...If it works for you, it works for me.

    When I was "out west" (Colorado) I had seen my fair share of roofing work. Probably "old school" with some of the new stuff today but I did quite a bit of work on Tremco White Hypalon. Somewhat pricey and it can be a PITA but it worked quite well.

    Given the amount of sun and heat roofs in your locale get coupled with large swings in temperature during the year....I think asphalt roofing products will go only so far.... Good Luck!
  7. Hogwildz

    Hogwildz Minister of Fire

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    Roll roofing is basically a big roll of similar material to an asphalt shingle. JUNK, don't waste your time or money.
    Torch down roofing, is technically called Modified Bitumen (spelling may be off). Decent stuff. Lasts about 10 years, sometimes longer if maintained. Also makes a big difference if the installer know what they are doing as far as install goes. Too hot, too much bleed will means its now thinner and lost some strength. Not heated enough and makes for poor seams, and potential for them to open up. Or there may be small fishmouths or gaps from not enough heat. It takes a while to get the hang of just how hot is enough but not too much. The flashings are done a few different ways, but I always double wrapped them. Heating these is same as roof, too hot and they wuill crack & leak eventually. Not enough, and its not sealed properly from the start, again eventually leaking.

    I'd say middle ground or moderate on the maintenance needs. The silver stuff is Aluminum coating. Theres both fibered & non fibered. Just as they sound. One is more silver liquid, the other same but with fibers. The fibered lasts longer. If you see it starting to fade or actually disappear showing the black roof underneath. Time to coat again. Can use a roller or brush. Some have their own preferences and some swear brushing is better. Ive done both, speed wise, an 18" roller works real fast.

    Roof cement (Muck) if used with the mesh tape made to go with it, will last longer then just slapping the muck onto the surface & troweling out.
    On some commercial roof applications, muck & tape is spec'd. Usually drip edge metal, flashing on /ac or mechanical units etc.
    I think and laugh cause I remember doing some big schools & government buildings with literally miles of edge metal. Troweling that is long, tedious and hand cramps after about a few hundred feet. We discoverd one day if ya just shoved yer hand in the 5 gallon can & cupped a big globbing hunk of muck, it was easier to spread & went further LOL. Of course having black hands sucked. Only thing on jog to clean it with was gasoline. Thinking back, not the brightest thing as far as exposure to chemicals, bu6 it worked well. Then I figured, hmmmm how bout dish washing gloves. Those good elbow length ones worked great.
    Most roofers just have a knack of experimenting & becoming "creative" when trying to speed things along or make a process easier. :) I won't say they are all the healthiest inventions or procedures. But back then, it got the job done, especially a very tiresome & unmotivating process or procedure.

    You might also have a old school tar roof. Ive done many, had a love hate feeling towards them. Good roofs, been put down for years. Again. good amount of maintenance, and suck to put down in summer. Messy as all hell. And guaranteed to get at very least a few splash burns. Old schoolers used to felt & tar the field, ad then muck the walls. I used tape as wide as 36" before. Not my favorite, but the old boy wanted it that way on jobs he sold. So be it.

    Ok, the proper way to fix modified (torch down) is with more modified, or modified patches. You can muck & tape. Might last a few years. Keep it aluminum coated . Check coating once a year, go over roof seams & flashings about 2x a year. Spring & fall. Not a DIY project if patching with modified. Some will disagree, but if you use the proper torch ( anywhere from 50,000 to 100,000 BTU's) and hit a pin hole in the deck, edge metal etc. You might just be calling the fire co.
    I still have my old torches, heck I have all my old roofing tools. I had, might still have a double head, man that thing is a flame thrower. Small holes, you can prolly get away with muck & TAPE, and coat. But proper fix is patch.
    Is your roof leaking? Have you gone up & cleaned debris, leaves etc off? If you can take some photos & a couple close ups of flashing & seams and I might be able to tell you what you have.
  8. Hogwildz

    Hogwildz Minister of Fire

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    I hate Karnac LMAO, too f'in thick, not as trowel friendly. ;)
    It was the solution for many a west & north Philly "get in quick, slap it down & get the hell out before dark" row home repairs.
  9. Hogwildz

    Hogwildz Minister of Fire

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    Keyman said it, modified in a warm climate is just always soft and the heat out there is just too much for it in my opinion. Was the roof kept coated with aluminum coating? Kepping it coated and free of debri can really extend the life. Putting EPDM (rubber) down is the way to go, but not cheap. With some guidance it can be done DIY. But its not cheap as I said. Alot of supply houses won't even sell it to you unless your certified to install. Theres always one or two th will sell it to anyone though.
    I'll reply separately as to yer patching & repairs.
  10. Hogwildz

    Hogwildz Minister of Fire

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    Some photos would be helpful. When you cut the blisters, was there water or moisture underneath? Does the roof have like a 1/2" fiberboard underneath the roofing?
    When you cut it, if cut to the decking (what is the decking material, steel corrugated?) you should find in this order. The torch down top ply, a gritty "base" sheet underneath which is usually screwed down with screws & metal plates, or if over wood, cap nailed down. then usually a 1/2" of fiberboard insulation. then the decking.
    SBS is a decent brand btw. Is the SBS smooth & black? or White or colored granulars on top? The problem is in the heat out there, the SBS expands & contracts, which causes alot of wrinkles. If not properly based. insulated, and fastened etc. If the blisters aren't leaking, I personally would leave them alone. Your cutting holes in an otherwise tight roof. The cement patches will only last so long. The wrinkles will last longer. Unless they are showing signs of severe open cracking.
    Make sure the acrylic is spec'd for modified bitumen, or else it will peel, flake let moisture between it & the modified and just compound problems.
    If already coated in the white acrylic, then don't bother aluminum coating, the two don't mix. Just keep it coated well with what you have on there now.
    Honestly, in roofing industry, one does not have 30 days to wait for a repair to be completed.
    Heres what I would do if, cutting blisters out.
    Cut down to deck, apply roof cement to the deck surface, save what you cut out roofing, insulation etc., not super thick, but enough to make sure the perimeter of the cut & the deck surface was one layer of cement, and that it is sealing the perimeter of the cut. Then take the pc. of insulation you cut out if any, set that same way it came out into the layer of muck you just applied, some muck should ooze out the sides all the way around, press it down in good. If there is base sheet, leave that pc
    out of the patch. Cement the top of the insulation you just out back in, again cover completely and the perimeter around the cut sides. Now is when I would torch down a new patch. But if cementing, fill the remainder of the hole with muck. A bit more than level with the roof surface. Then cover the entire hole and about 4"-6" of the roof surface around the perimeter of the hole. So you prolly now have the hole filled in and a round or square etc spot of muck over that area. Now no blister, no hole, just a spot of muck. Take your mesh tape and cover the hole extending the tape the 4"-6" beyond the holes sides onto the existing roof surface, If the tape does not cover the hole in one shot. Start at one side laying tape on, and each next pc of tape, overlap the previous one an inch or so. until the tape has now formed one big mesh patch over the area. Then with your trowel, press the tape in by slightly pressing and sliding trowel over length of the tape. Apply your top coat of muck over tape. going another 2"-3" past the tape edge. smooth out with trowel. Don't go too thick on top, it will only crack if too thick. Say About 1/4" to 3/8" layer of muck over tape. Not an exact science, just use your best judgment. Now if, coating with acrylic, yes now wait until muck has cured. Whatever the can says.
    One note. By asphalt emulsion I am thinking your talking bout the black roof coating. If your coating over the patch with the white acrylic, I would skip the black roof coating & apply the white coating directly over the much when cured. Of course if the manufacturers can specifies the the roof emulsion over the muck & under the white acrylic, then do that. I never have. Your basically putting two roof coatings on, and I am not sure that the white acrylic will jive with the black emulsion so well.
    The emulsion usually never really hardens, and th acrylic I would think would not adhere great, and harden as the coating underneath doesn't. I have seen this, and the acrylic basically cracks and flakes off due to the black roof coating underneath not hardening., and giving the acrylic a solid surface to harden and bond to.
    Muck if too thick also takes a long time to harden, but it will skim on top. I'd let it cure good and not go too thick. I have aluminum coated over fresh muck. it can be done, but the silver coat will crack and flake off in a few months to a year. You have a soft layer, with a hard layer on top, the hard layer loses cause not adhered to the surface below. Personally cost wise. I'd aluma coat, and go back after a few months, check and touch up. Then touch up as needed. I am pretty sure the aluma coat is less expensive as the acrylic.
    I hope i haven't made it more confusing. If I did, sorry, let me know and I'll try and explain better and simpler. I confuse myself while thinking, trying to spell & type all at the same time ;) Ge some photos if ya can, I'm curious to see this roof. and a couple close ups of the blisters, and if possible a shot or 2 of the open cuts, when/if ya get a chance.
  11. Hogwildz

    Hogwildz Minister of Fire

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    Agreed, Hypalon was made for out west & the hot climates. Works great at start, the stuff we used failed after time. I had mistaken his TPO roof for Hypalon. Which I think is in the Hypalon family chemical wise, but improved. We used to use, hmmm whos was it.... E.P Henry, the stuff sucked!!!!!! Could not reactivate to perform any repairs, basically everything was mega caulked with that runny EP Henry Hypalon caulk they had us put lil squirt bottles. The whole roof was a joke. This was on a Naval Air Development Base here in PA. Alot like modified in the way that, heat too much, toastt, not heat enough, no seal. Caulk, caulk, caulk LOL. We had a big heat welding machine, was so cumbersome, was easier to just use the hand welders. Needless to say, we had the rep out, and even he could not reactivate the Hypalon at reseal & repair. He told us, caulk it. A-hole I went back a couple years later & the Hypalon actually sun rotted & cracked. Needless to say EP Henry wasn't making it much longer I believe.
    We went full force with EPDM & Modified after that. Had a good estimator who would talk the architects into what they thought they wanted used & spec;s (what we wanted to install). Is Hypalon even around anymore? They also came out with the white EPDM years back, less hot on the hands in summer ;). Hard to keep white LOL, but rubber rocks for commercial application.
  12. keyman512us

    keyman512us Member

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    Well from my own experience with Hypalon...not all is created equal.

    Tremco Hypalon was about the best IMHO. But it was 'finicky' to say the least. We had one roof to maintain (mechanicaly fastened...at the seams...and 'un-ballasted'..WTF were they thinking right??)... but it was a rather large roof. The particular building, at one time was the 3rd largest modular office building in the world. It was made from 124 'trailers' bolted together. (it had another 88 trailers originally but were removed a few years previously). Quite an accomplishment but scarry as all h^ll. I don't know what was worse...having to work in the building or up on the roof. Either way..if it ever caught fire it would have gone up quick. The deck was held up by wood truss (27" O.C. couldn't figure that one out) and only had a 3/8" plywood deck!!!

    Rotted decking was easy to find. Step on it hear the plywood "shatter" beneath your feet and pray like h^ll the Tremco hypalon held you up...thankfully it always did!

    We had the Tremco rep out to "show us how it's done". He was a "Crusty old dude" from Ohio that smoked three packs a day and had been doing roofing for over 40 years. He showed us everything we needed to know in about 3 hours. He did a few parapet repairs, HVAC curbs, 'flashed' a few roof drains and showed us how to do "Open heart surgery deck repairs with an H cut". All along the way we shook our heads and nodded in agreement...if base safety had walked on the job we would have all been up on charges!!! So we knew "how to do it" and then figured out "how we could do it safely" so as not to get in "hot water".

    At the end of the first day he shook his head and laughed "I never thought I would see such a 'mickey mouse' (original)install of our product...especially on a high visibility USAF base...you boys have a lot of work ahead of ya'...either that or somebody better get a s^it load of umbrellas for the folks in the building".

    I loved being "on call" on rainy weekends. Get called out for a "bad leak at Bldg 608". Drive out to the base in the pouring rain to "fix" the roof...well at least until Monday morning. How??? "The handyman's secret weapon...Duct Tape" ;)
  13. keyman512us

    keyman512us Member

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    "Duct Tape"...a roofers' best friend (Continued)

    So back to the Hypalon...and how to fix it in "an emergency". Luckily my paycheck wasn't signed by "A for profit orginization". Being a 2X0 in the USAF we had "quite the large lee-way". We got creative to say the least.

    On this particular roof...the mechanically held seams would blow apart all to frequently. The 'strips' were 5 feet wide with a six inch lap strip (should have been at least 8" per manuf. spec.) Going on that roof on a rainy windy day seeing the sheets lifted off the deck looked like a white ocean of waves. Add in that it was slippery as all h^ll... a fun way to earn your $$$. We learned as we went along. "The Boys" quickly got a game plan together. All of us came close to "losing a stripe or two" more than once. Being an enlisted man telling a major or colonel "They needed a 'window-ectomy (so they could see where they were going with their head up their backside)"..wasn't always the best career move...but it was done. We put it in no certain terms...you are either with us or against us. You want the roof fixed??? We get the final say...and we do it how we want...otherwise buy the inhabitants umbrellas.

    So up on the roof looking at six feet of seam "blown apart"??? Roll your "tool kit" out from the corner and get to work! We built a special "dolly" for leaks. Broom, squeegee and sandbags, rolls of duct tape, and dry rags, all at the ready. Put down some sand bags (burlap ones to suck up the water...plastic to 'ballast' the membrane) and shoot some fastener disks down..cut clean and prep the area...roll out a 'temporary' lap seal and duct tape it in place. As a final touch...put a half dozen 28" traffic cones around the perimeter (so the base commander could look out his window Monday morning and spot the leak) and it was Miller time!

    The Tremco Hypalon was a good roof..if it was done right. We bought pallets of 5 gallon buckets of adhesive and anything we fixed got totally adhered..the way the manufacturer spec'd. Buying tens of thousands of $$$ worth of roofing materials...no problem!

    The hardest part??? Getting base contracting to "approve" the purchase of...get this 'Spic-and-Span" detergent. "We have tons of soap available right in supply...we can't authorize buying spic and span". Had to fight it. "You got millions of dollars worth of equipment and the backbone of national defense in peril...and we can't buy a $3 box of detergent to protect it??" We won though. We had to do a ton of paperwork but it all boiled down to the manufacturer requiring the initial cleaning to be done with Spic-n-Span to prep the membrane.

    Yup Tremco...First clean it with a spic and span solution to remove any dirt...let it dry...wipe it down with straight Zylene..let that dry...and you can put down the adhesive just like with EPDM.

    Lap Sealant(Tremco produced)...We choose Bronze colored (easier to distinguish repaired areas). 3/4" wide bead and "tooled" into place with your finger...the soapy (spic and span water) works like a charm. Mundane and tedious as all hell but it worked. We all got some good sun tans every summer.

    The bronze color??? Made the roof look like frankenstein railroad track scars...but hey...all the more incentive for the powers to be to argue amongst themselves why they should build a real building.

    I laugh everytime I think of that building and that roof. It was a white elephant to say the least. My employer??? The USAF has some of the most beautifull, high tech, fancy expensive planes in the world...the roofs over their buildings I can't be so enthusiastic about though.

    You think constructing/fixing a 'scupper' on a roof is fun??? Try making a roof drain system out of 4" toilet closet flanges...then hang 300 feet of 4" PVC from #12 AWG THHN electricians wire...over the heads of folks learning 'how to fly sats'...all the while being told "We got no money to fix that roof...just do what you can".

    ...The next time we had to find the roof leaks??? We plugged the drains ran a fire hose to the fire hydrant in front of the building and went to lunch. We sure did find them leaks in a hurry though!!!!

    I look back and smile though. Knowing I did my part "protecting my country". If the folks at their desks could have seen the ducks swimming around in the 'pools on the roof' when we first went up there it woould have been priceless! :ahhh:

    ...I wish I could have taken pictures. :lol:
  14. Hogwildz

    Hogwildz Minister of Fire

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    If its good enough for Nascar, its good enough for roofing :)
  15. keyman512us

    keyman512us Member

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    "Hey we just want to race the roofers' dolly..." ;-P
  16. keyman512us

    keyman512us Member

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    That roof threw us curves we could never imagine though.

    It was always "the little things" that made you shake your head though.

    Take for example the "found on base" concept. In the military often times things get 'side tracked' by higher priorities.

    We got into it with the "ground pounders"(pavement & equipment shop) in our own squadron...over traffic cones.

    We 'stole' ('requisitioned' in proper military terminology) four dozen 28" orange traffic cones(for the roof job) from a shipment they ordered and were being held in base supply. Why?? Because base safety cited us on "soft spots" on the roof deck where someone might fall through. So how can we safely address the on going problem?? Put out traffic cones. Black and yellow caution striping just wouldn't stick (supervisors idea..lol) We kept a dozen to "mark repair areas...six cones in a tight grouping was an emergency repair" and the other three dozen to mark soft spots and areas that needed other repairs.

    So then the politics come into play.

    The base commander felt the traffic cones on the roof were an 'eyesore' that needed to be avoided when dignitaries flew in by chopper.

    I can't remember which dignitary it was that flew in that started it. Whether is was the prime minister of the UK or the joint chiefs...couldn't tell ya!

    So we had to improvise. We had to make a "gone fishing sign" stating policy to be posted at the ladder entry to the roof. A sign was made, padlocked in place with a letter from the powers that be to "pull the cones".

    Basically it was procedure to announce to personnel the warning devices were removed and they were "on their own".

    With all the BS we had to go through...it was amazing we ever got any work done!

    "Got a job order to go 'pull' the cones off the roof...Collin Powell and the joint chiefs must be coming through again..." :grrr:
  17. Hogwildz

    Hogwildz Minister of Fire

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    LMAO, I woulda painted a big smiley face on the roof at each spot ;)
    On rubber job we did, I painted a smiley face on an AC units coolant fins, sure as hell the supervisor from the building came up and saw it. He wasn't too happy.
    I left it there :)
  18. krubbyknobs

    krubbyknobs New Member

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    I need to install a few hvac roof curbs into an existing epdm roof (ballast). I am familiar with self adheisive membrane, but have never used epdm. my question is, are the tecniques the same for both? and if so what materials will i need?
  19. Hogwildz

    Hogwildz Minister of Fire

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    By self adhesive membrane, do you mean uncured flashing? Depends on manufacturer. Most want EPDM field rubber used to wrap the curbs. Then use the "peel & stick" self adhesive uncured flashing on the corners, usually a double wrap. Although they had the premade peel & stick corners the last few years I was installing, and these were one to a corner.
    This is all dependent on if its still under warranty or not. If it is, the curbs flashing must be done to the roofing manufacturer's specs. If its out of warranty, you can do it any way you want. Unless they made vast improvements, the uncured lasts about 10 years, and you will be reflashing again. The other problem is the ballast. It leaves the rubber dirty as hell, and it must be cleaned reallllll good to get the flashing to stick worth a damn. Keep in mind, you cannot use an asphalt based product on the EPDM, it will eat at it, and at the very least bubble the rubber anywhere you put an asphalt based product. Chances are if you have not used or installed EPDM roofing before, the stuff your thinking of using is the wrong stuff. For EPDM, you will typically need a cleaner, a primer, a black or seam & flashing glue, lap sealant, and water cut off mastic. You will most likely need to cut the rubber and insulation down to the decking & buiuld back up to roof level with 2"x4" or larger framing to rest the curbs on. If you go over the rubber and its has iso or similar insulation underneath, the object on the curb, may cause the curb to crush the insulation and cause leaks in the roofing. EPDM is all about preparation. If its not prepared right, the flashings & glues will fail & leak. Especially on a ballast roof.
  20. krubbyknobs

    krubbyknobs New Member

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    Thanks for the good and fast reply. I will try to explain in detail how I was thinking of doing it, and maybe you could give me some tips if I'm wrong.

    The curb is already in place on top of the EPDM. I was planing on firstly removing the ballast from the area I need to do the work, then clean the rubber. (what product I don't know yet.) Then I was going to cut the rubber to the metal roof deck as you said, then screw the curb into place. The curb is not insulated, so i was going to use Iso mechanically fastened to the curb. I suppose there must be some kind of adhiesive that i would have to roll onto all the areas where I am planning on putting the EPDM. At the corners of the curb I was planning to put some Gussets (the house shaped pieces. I don't know if that's what there called where you are.) Starting on the side closest to the drain I would apply the EPDM and roll it onto the Iso and the field. (For the wraping of the sides of the curb, I hope that it's the same kind of cuts that are used for Soprema Elastomeric membrane (bitumen)). On the laps that go 8 inches on the field I was going to use some of the special "caulking" to help seal them.

    My experience is with Soprema Elastomeric membrane (bitumen). That is what I meant by self-adhiesive membrane in my earlier post.
    Most of my experience comes from working with an old Newfie, so it's mostly on the job traing, with the exeption of a course on how to lay the torch on stuff.

    With a bit of "roofing common sence", and a few of your helpfull hint's I hope to be able to pull this one off, and some in the future too!.
    Your help is much appreciated.
    thank you
    jesse
  21. Hogwildz

    Hogwildz Minister of Fire

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  22. krubbyknobs

    krubbyknobs New Member

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    montreal qc canada
    Are there any temperature restrictions on the glue, and should I let it dry a bit (get tacky) before I stick the EPDM ?
  23. Hogwildz

    Hogwildz Minister of Fire

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    6,680
    Loc:
    Next to nuke plant Berwick, PA.
    In the summer when real hot, the glue will cure fast, so about 5 mins and stick. In colder weather it can take a lil longer. When you can stick your finger against it and not have glue smear all over your finger or the rubber, your good to go. This time of year aint bad. A sunny day will make the glue set faster. Cloudy day a lil longer. You want to use like a 4" or 6" paint roller & roller pad for large areas, use one that is not cardboard tube based or it will fall apart. Something like a 3/8" nap is good. Put a nice even coat on, not real thick, just enough to put a thin layer or film on the pcs of rubber. Try not to leave any pools, puddles or globs, as these will not dry as the rest evenly, and will not adhere right. You can use the glue basically any time of year or temp. Accept when its raining of course. For smaller spots or patches, use one of the cheap 3" wooden handled natural fiber brushes like at Home Depot etc. Ya have to coat both surfaces, Ya prolly know that, just making sure.
  24. TedNH

    TedNH Member

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2006
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    102
    Loc:
    Surry NH
    I'll bite...

    How do I remove mold/moss from my residential roof?
  25. Hogwildz

    Hogwildz Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2006
    Messages:
    6,680
    Loc:
    Next to nuke plant Berwick, PA.
    Bleach will kill it, if you try and scrape or scrub the moss, it will pull the granulars and possibly top layer of roofing off. It has already sunk its roots into the nooks & crannies of the roofing surface. You can try to lightly brush it, but if the roof granulars start coming off in large amounts, just kill it and let it go. Copper will leave stains & streaks down the roof, although it does deter moss growth. Better yet do a search for zinc strips online. Basically a long roll of zinc banding, mount 1/2 under the top ridge cap shingle and 1/2 sticking out from underneath all the way across the roof. Won't stain the roof and also keeps moss from growing. And lasts a long time.
    Also if you have trees overhanging the roof, cutting the branches back will also help.

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