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Noodling

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by ckarotka, Jul 28, 2010.

  1. ckarotka

    ckarotka Minister of Fire

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    Does cutting this way dull a chain faster or not? Been doing some noodles and haven't really noticed any big diff but it would make my life alot easier to do more with the current batch od wood.

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  2. midwestcoast

    midwestcoast Minister of Fire

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    don't see how it would make too much difference & I haven't noticed any when I've noodled. You are ussually cutting more wood when noodling vs bucking, so it may seem to dull a bit quicker I guess. I say if it makes things easier, noodle-away!
  3. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    Dont cut dead center and its not to bad!

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  4. Wood Duck

    Wood Duck Minister of Fire

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    I thought this thread was about catching catfish bare handed, so I'll have to adjust my response on the fly, but here goes... I don't see why wood would dull a chain any faster in one direction than another. I don't really think cutting wood dulls a chain much at all, but rather the dirt on the wood dulls the chain. It seems like if you could cut perfectly clean wood, your chain would never go dull, but in reality there is always dirt that dulls the chain. So, this makes me think it is not the orientation of the wood, but rather the cleanliness of the wood that matters.
  5. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    The wood is harder when noodling or milling cross cutting is much easier on chains and saws, But with that said if you go off center its not quite as hard on the chain and saw. (Ripping is much more difficult than cross cut.)
  6. fire_man

    fire_man Minister of Fire

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    I bought a special ripping chain for my Husky 455 Rancher because I was dulling my regular chain so much when I noodled. The teeth look much different on this chain, the angle is much less on the cutting edge. If nothing else, it must be easier on the saw and bar to use the ripping chain when noodling. Why else would there be cross cut hand saws and ripping hand saws?
  7. Battenkiller

    Battenkiller Minister of Fire

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    Steel wears no matter what you are cutting. The very best old socket slicks (harder than chain cutter steel) that I have put shaving-sharp edges on wear down in about an hour or less of hand paring, even in a very soft wood like northern white cedar. They'll still cut with some effort, but they won't shave hair at all anymore. Not a speck of dirt on this stuff since it's all been re-sawn into planks and run through the planer. On a hard wood like white oak, I'm lucky if I get a hundred cuts before I need to touch them up. If you think about how many separate cuts a chainsaw cutter makes as it's going past the wood fibers at 45 MPH, it's a miracle they cut at all after a few minutes.
  8. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    Good question ripping chain is cut to 10 degrees and is for a smoother surface only...With that said I do think the saw runs smoother with 10 degrees when ripping.
  9. ckarotka

    ckarotka Minister of Fire

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    Thanks guys,

    I know how to cut wood with table/mitre saws, 60tooth vs ? for cross cuts and stuff. I figured the same rules would apply with a chain. I know when I use a 60tooth blade to rip on the table saw (cuz I'm to lazy to change it for a couple of cuts) I smokes the blade.
  10. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    My dad gets hurt way more often than I with his cabinet shop. (and he has a stop saw)
  11. wendell

    wendell Minister of Fire

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    Remember when you are noodling you are going with the grain and shaving the wood (thus the noodles) like a plane. When you are ripping when milling you are cutting across the grain. Very different.
  12. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    noodle and milling are very close to the same thing your just hitting it dead center(when milling) and makes it harder, Thats why its best when noodleing to hit it off center. Both taken from the end of the log.
  13. wendell

    wendell Minister of Fire

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    I guess in Indiana you must do things different. Everywhere else we noodle from the side. ;-)
  14. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    uh, guess my next question is what you calling the side because everwhere else stands them on end and saw through them like a spliter does. Thats noodling.
  15. wendell

    wendell Minister of Fire

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    Nope, that's ripping. Noodling is cutting through the bark. I've never seen anyone cut through the end.
  16. wendell

    wendell Minister of Fire

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  17. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    lol Thats why they call it noodling and yes you cut right through the end here what the shaving look like noodles....And you right its alot like ripping but you do not want to go dead center it will make it a little eaiser.

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  18. wendell

    wendell Minister of Fire

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  19. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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  20. wendell

    wendell Minister of Fire

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  21. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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  22. wendell

    wendell Minister of Fire

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    Well, I'd try it both ways but I'm sure you will find it a lot faster and a lot easier on your saw cutting through the bark. Try it and let us know what you find out.
  23. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    I have done it both ways and most of the time we try to get it in the splitter, and if its to much it get it in there I cut it where it lyes and that normally butt up...I will give it another shot .
  24. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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  25. bsearcey

    bsearcey New Member

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    Definitely noodle from the side not the end. You won't get any noodles if you don't. Have to cut parrallel to the grain to get those.

    BTW - that vid of the Aussie noodling was great - and holy cow that spotted gum is beautiful. Wish I could get some of that for flooring.

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